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Thread: How do you pronounce endive??

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
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    Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
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    Talking How do you pronounce endive??

    Yesterday I saw Deborah Madison on Canada AM, promoting her new cookbook. She made a couple recipes (a pea soup and a beet salad).

    Something that struck me as funny was that she kept pronouncing the word endive like this: "on-deev". I realize that's perhaps the way it's pronounced in French, but I even live in a French city and I don't pronounce it that way!! It just sounds too affected or something.

    How do you all pronounce endive?

    Julie

  2. #2
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    Since I have a Flemish husband and Belgian endive is a traditional and typical Flemish vegetable, I just use the Flemish name for it: witloof! (pronounced like wit-loaf) Solves the problem of how to pronounce endive!!

  3. #3
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    The Germans pronounce it ENDIVSCHEN!
    Curleytop

  4. #4
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    I pronounce it EN-DIVE. Tricky, huh?

    But I'm probably wrong...I'm always getting corrected on how to pronounce Dulce de Leche (and I took four years of French!)
    People are as happy as they make up their minds to be.

    -- Abraham Lincoln

  5. #5
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    Originally posted by Jill123
    I pronounce it EN-DIVE. Tricky, huh?

    But I'm probably wrong...I'm always getting corrected on how to pronounce Dulce de Leche (and I took four years of French!)
    Ummm ... dulce de leche is traditionally Spanish, not French, isn't it? Maybe that's part of the problem.

    I say "N-dive," but it only makes sense that it should be "on-deev." Don't think I could get away with that in a grocery store in Central Ohio ...
    --Mary Kate--

    "In all our woods there is not a tree so hard to kill as the buckeye. The deepest girdling does not deaden it, and even after it is cut down and worked up into the side of a cabin it will send out young branches, denoting to all the world that Buckeyes are not easily conquered, and could with difficulty be destroyed." - Daniel Drake, 1833

  6. #6
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    From Epicurious food dictionary

    endive
    [EN-dyv; AHN-deev; ahn-DEEV]
    Endive is closely related to and often confused with its cousin, CHICORY. They're both part of the same botanical family, Cichorium. There are three main varieties of endive: Belgian endive, curly endive and escarole. Belgian endive, also known as French endive and witloof (white leaf), is a small (about 6-inch-long), cigar-shaped head of cream-colored, tightly packed, slightly bitter leaves. It's grown in complete darkness to prevent it from turning green, using a labor-intensive growing technique known as BLANCHING. Belgian endive is available from September through May, with a peak season from November through April. Buy crisp, firmly packed heads with pale, yellow-green tips. Belgian endives become bitter when exposed to light. They should be refrigerated, wrapped in a paper towel inside a plastic bag, for no more than a day. They can be served cold as part of a salad, or cooked by braising or baking. Curly endive, often mistakenly called chicory in the United States, grows in loose heads of lacy, green-rimmed outer leaves that curl at the tips. The off-white center leaves form a compact heart. The leaves of the curly endive have a prickly texture and slightly bitter taste. Escarole has broad, slightly curved, pale green leaves with a milder flavor than either Belgian or curly endive. Both curly endive and escarole are available year-round, with the peak season from June through October. They should be selected for their fresh, crisp texture; avoid heads with discoloration or insect damage. Store curly endive and escarole, tightly wrapped, in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. They're both used mainly in salads, but can also be briefly cooked and eaten as a vegetable or in soups.

    Copyright Barron's Educational Services, Inc. 1995 based on THE FOOD LOVER'S COMPANION, 2nd edition, by Sharon Tyler Herbst.

    Now....could you pick it out of a lettuce lineup?

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Sure, it's right here, and even includes witloof as a synonym:

    http://www.foodsubs.com/Greensld.html#Belgian%20endive
    Susan

    So many books--So little time.

  8. #8
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    Here's another vote for n-dive! Although witloaf sounds cool. Sounds like something I could use to call my dog when he does something silly

    CK
    let the journey begin:
    http://www.mp3.com/critical7

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    Austin, TX
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    Originally posted by CKL
    Although witloaf sounds cool. Sounds like something I could use to call my dog when he does something silly

    CK
    I love it!!
    Bloom where you're planted.

  10. #10
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    military family, Germany
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    In my part of Germany they call it Chicoree i.e. Chicory, which is what I usually refer to it as in the US too.

  11. #11
    Another N-Dive pronouncer here. And not to change the subject, but how do you pronounce "produce?" My WW leader says PROD (like a cattle prod)-uce. Drives me nuts.

  12. #12
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    N-Dive and Pro-duce (not to be confused with the amateur-duce. Oh, nevermind, that was silly! )
    Life is either a daring adventure, or nothing. To keep our faces toward change and behave like free spirits in the presence of fate is strength undefeatable.

    --Helen Keller

  13. #13
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    thanks for the laugh for the day
    Anne

  14. #14
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    Kitsap County, WA, USA
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    Shirley, that was great. I think it was the first time I laughed out loud while reading this bulletin board! AND, I love knowing other people have the same pronunciation problems I have.

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