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Thread: How many bread bakers do we have?

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  1. #1
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    Question How many bread bakers do we have?

    I took a class at King Arthur recently and suddenly my focus has been almost exclusively on recipes for breads. I've made a couple that came out very well and I considered posting them here but I wasn't sure how well they'd be received. Is there a market for bread recipes here?

    The first one that I really liked made a single large boule and it was loaded with chopped cranberries and chopped toasted pecans. Delicious for breakfast. The second one was a HUGE hit with Sweetheart. It made two loaves and has herbs and chopped Vidalia onion kneaded in.

    Anyone want to share bread recipes or am I the only one with this obsession?

  2. #2
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    Count me in as interested in some bread recipes. Years ago I made ALL of our bread from scratch, then the pounds started coming on so I backed off. I have just recently gotten interested again-The two recipes you referred to sound great! I would love to try them. Sue

  3. #3
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    I second that request!

    they sound wonderful, yes, please post!!
    "There are two means of refuge from the miseries of life: music and cats." - Albert Schweitzer

  4. #4
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    Talking

    Bread baker here! I have been trying to perfect a wild-yeast sourdough all summer, to no avail. I can make very good wild yeast bread, but not wonderful wild yeast bread...and I am close to giving up.

    I guess there is no shame in using yeast....

    I'd love some recipes!

    Jen

  5. #5
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    I love baking bread, but haven't made much over the past few years . I hope that changes this fall and winter, though. (For some reason, I rarely feel like making bread in the warmer weather, although I don't have qualms about making rich desserts or hearty meals when it's hot out.)

    Looking forward to good recipes too - and I have one or two to share but alas! I just packed the cookbook yesterday. If anyone is still interested a few weeks from now, I'll post a couple then.

    Natasha
    "If you're not chasing after miracles, what's the point?" The movie Saint Ralph

    "What it all comes down to
    Is that everything's gonna be fine fine fine
    I've got one hand in my pocket
    And the other one is giving a high five" - Alanis Morisette, Hand in My Pocket

  6. #6
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    I love to make bread although, like Natasha, don't tend to make it in the summer. I made my first bread less than a year ago and now I'm hooked! So definitely bring on the bread recipes.

  7. #7
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    I love making bread also. There is something very satisfying about kneading the dough and creating a wonderful loaf of bread from scratch.

    I haven't made much bread recently (mainly due to the weather) but its certainly something I enjoy to do on a weekend morning in the fall/winter.

    Please share you recipes.

    YP

  8. #8
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    I too love baking bread. For years I kept my sourdough starter alive, then one day we departed Baking bread gives me a warm fuzzy feeling. It's pure, simple and wholesome.


    My starter was 1 cup skim
    3 tab. low-fat yogurt
    1 cup all- purpose flour

    I will gladly post if anyone wants it. Right now I need to get the morning started.
    The most important human endeavor is the striving for morality in our actions. Our inner balance, and even our very existence depends on it. Only morality in our actions can give beauty and dignity to our lives

    -Albert Einstein-

  9. #9
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    Feel free to post!!! I do bake bread from time to time, but I don't really consider myself a bread baker. I love having new recipes on hand for when the mood strikes (which is fall and winter as most have mentioned already)

  10. #10
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    Mine turn out OK if I use the flour that is out on the shelf at the grocery stores (processed)...but when I grind my own, I have a harder time getting it to rise...it's a work in progress
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

  11. #11
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    Bread baker here! I love the stuff! It's been too hot to bake lately, but I'll file away any recipes that look good for fall!
    -Rebecca


    Endurance comes from exhaustion. Keep running!
    --DH, aka "Coach"

  12. #12
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    bread baking

    subject dear to my heart along with jazz. we made all our bread during the years we raised 6 kids we made it in an old fashioned bread mixer--like a pail with a crank you clamped on..it made 6 loaves. now i live alone & still make my own bread because it's very difficult to find GOOD bread in some areas.this might be of interest to some beginner bread makers--it's from cooking light--nov dec 94 p 138. this is what i do now==FRENCH WHEAT BAGUETTES. only i make it in 2 loaf pans & cut it thick--makes most delicious toast thick & crunchy with strawberry jam on top. any one can make this bread with one hand tied behind them---. in a cuisinart. takes only a few minutes.

  13. #13
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    I bake bread although not as frequently since the family has scattered. I have some wonderful recipes from the DAK book that I will post later. They use a bread machine, but you can use make them manually, also.

    Sami
    Don't give up, Moses was once a basket case.

  14. #14
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    Mocha...your starter sounds intriging! Can you post, with feeding and use instructions?

    Thanks so much...Jen

  15. #15
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    I would love bread recipes. I bake occasionally manually. Usually with bread machine. DH loves bread, I am not a huge bread eater, but love GOOD bread. Please post!!!

    Lisa

    PS. I have never made bread into a boule, could you explain the steps for that, I have always wanted to try.

  16. #16
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    Please post your recipes Jasmine-Rose! Like Karole I use to bake all our bread-I have slacked off over the past years but one of my fall goals to make bread again! I would love to go to a KA baking class but that is impossible. Your recipes would be the next best thing!
    You think you're not ever going to be able to eat another thing, but alas, you will find yourself feeling strangely peckish around teatime. The more you eat, the more you want. That's the way it goes."

    Nigella Lawson

  17. #17
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    Go for it. I am extremely dough challenged and need the practice. Like many here, that won't be until cooler weather.
    Life is all about a$$; you're either covering it, laughing it off, kicking it, kissing it, busting it, trying to get a piece of it, behaving like one, or you live with one.

    Maxine

  18. #18
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    Bread!

    Just this summer I've discovered bread baking. In preparation for a supper club that ultimately fell-through, I picked up Peter Reinhart's The Bread Baker's Apprentice - and it is WONDERFUL! The first 100+ pages of the book are about general technique and characteristics, with the rest being recipes.

    So far I've made his French Baguette, Pan la'Ancienne, and Marvelous Multigrain (true to his description of the best toasting bread ever). It's a great book, and his technique of extra-long fermentation times has produced some really great breads.

  19. #19
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    BREAD BAKER HERE!!! I make sourdough almost every week.
    I use a starter that a very nice woman sent me when I was on the "PRODIGY" bulletin board years ago. (It was dried and sent thru snail mail! It was originally "Goldrush" which you can buy in the stores. She lived in Texas and of course it had mutated, but it then mutated itself to Southern California. I dried some of my starter too, and keep it in the freezer "just in case"! I have had it going for about 6 years! I DIGRESS!
    Yes, of course I would like more recipes. I use the breadmachine dough method, then hand shape, and bake in clay cookers! I LOVE only
    CRUSTY BREAD! Won't eat any mushy, squashy bread

    Curleytop

  20. #20
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    Sourdough Starter-( 1 1/2 cups)

    1 cup skim milk
    3 tab. low-fat yogurt
    1 cup all-purpose flour

    Heat the milk to 90 to 100 degress F. Remove from heat & stir in the yogurt. Pour into a warmed container & cover tightly. Place in a warm spot (80-100F, but not above 110). Good spots are on top of water heaters, in a gas oven with just the pilot light on, or in an electric oven with the interior light on-any partially sheltered area where heat collects. After 6-8 hours, the mixture will clabber, forming a soft curd that does not flow readily when the container is tilted slightly. Check the mixture peridically, and if a clear liquid rises to the surface, stir it back in. If it has turner light pink in color, it has begun to spoil; discard and begin again.

    After the curd has formed, add the flour and stir until smooth. Cover tightly, and set in a warm place again. Let stand for two to five days, until the mixture is full of bubbles and has a good sour smell . The starter is ready to use as directed in the recipes. Always let the starter come to room temperature before using, which takes several hours. Get it out the night before if you plan to bake in the morning.

    To replenish the starter
    So you will always have an ample supply, replenish the starter each time you use it by adding equal amounts of milk & flour. For example, if you use 1 cup starter, warm 1 cup skim milk and add it to the starter with 1 cup flour. Stir until smooth. Cover tightly, and let stand in a warm place for a few hours or overnight-until bubbly-then cover and store in the refrigerator. If you bake infrequently, discard about half the starter every few weeks and replenish it with warm milk & flour. It can also be frozen for about a month, or two, but this slows down the fermenting action considerably. If the starter was frozen, let it stand in a warm place for about 24 hours, or until bubbly, before using.

    Will start new post for bread recipe
    The most important human endeavor is the striving for morality in our actions. Our inner balance, and even our very existence depends on it. Only morality in our actions can give beauty and dignity to our lives

    -Albert Einstein-

  21. #21
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    Wow! Looks like there's plenty of interest

    Thanks to all of you for your enthusiastic replies . I've been reading this thread while eating my lunch - a turkey sandwich on the herb bread I described above. YUM!

    Tonight when I get home I'll post a new thread, perhaps titled something like Bread Recipes for the week of Aug 12th. That way we'll have a central place to post recipes for breads using yeast (wild or commercial), and pastries and sweet breads, too. I'll start with the two recipes I described and we can all add to the thread. I tend to bake bread mostly on the weekend just now so perhaps this will become a weekly thread. I'd love to see what all of you are baking as well.

    I have a few sources I'll be drawing from: The Tassajara Bread Book; Beard on Bread; Beth Hensperger's Bread Bible; Peter Reinhart's Brother Juniper's Bread Book: Slow Rise as Method and Metaphor; and what I brought home from King Arthur. This will be fun!

    - E.

  22. #22
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    Sourdough White Bread
    (two med. size round loaves)

    A bread with a good, crisp crust, and a moist, springy, sour interior. From The Fannie Farmer Baking Book. By Marion Cunningham.

    1 1/4 cups warm water
    1 cup sourdough starter, at room temp.
    About 5 cups all-purpose flour
    1 tab. salt
    2 tab. cornmeal

    In a large mixing bowl, combine the warm water, starter, & 2 1/2 cups of the flour. Beat until smooth, cover w/plastic wrap, & let stand in a warm place (about 85) for 6-8 hours or overnight, until thick, full of bubbles, and spongy-looking.
    Add the salt & enough remaining flour to make a fairly stiff, manageable dough. Turn out onto a lightly floured surface & knead for a minute or two. Let rest for 10 min.
    Resume kneading for about 10 min, until smooth & elastic, adding just enough more flour to keep the dough from being too sticky. Place in a greased bowl, cover & let rise in a warm place until double in bulk. Punch the dough down and divide it in half. Plump eash piece into a round, then draw your hands down the sids, stretching the dough toward the bottom & turning it as you work. Continue stretching & turning until the round is perfectly smooth. Pinch the bottom of the loaves firmly where the seams come together. Sprinkle a large baking sheet with the cornmeal and place the formed loaves on it. pinched side down. Cover loosely, & let it rise until double in bulk.
    With a razor blade or sharp knife, slash a 1/2 inch-deep X across the top of each risen loaf, then spray or brush them with cold water. Place in a preheated 375 oven and bake for 10 min.then brush or spray again. Bake for 10 min. more & brush or spray again. Bake 40 min. more then transer to rack to cool (total baking ime is 1 hour).

    This is truly a wonderful sourdough bread, I kept the starter for over a year. I never froze it so I can't comment on that. Hope someone tries this, and be sure to let me know if you liked.
    The most important human endeavor is the striving for morality in our actions. Our inner balance, and even our very existence depends on it. Only morality in our actions can give beauty and dignity to our lives

    -Albert Einstein-

  23. #23
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    I'm a bread baker too! I'll be getting back into the habit when it cools down a bit. There is nothin' like coming in from a crisp fall day to the smell of bread baking. *warm fuzzies*
    "Feelin' Guilty
    For finding a Cheerio in my bra and then going ahead and eating it." Dooce

  24. #24
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    Originally posted by wallycat
    Mine turn out OK if I use the flour that is out on the shelf at the grocery stores (processed)...but when I grind my own, I have a harder time getting it to rise...it's a work in progress

    Do you "age" your flour after you grind it? How do you grind it? Does the temperature of the flour go up when it's ground? These are all things that could affect the final product.
    "Feelin' Guilty
    For finding a Cheerio in my bra and then going ahead and eating it." Dooce

  25. #25
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    I agree with Wallycat - baking with your own ground flour can be a bit more challenging to get a consistant product. I have gone back to using regular yeast (as opposed to bread machine or instant). I proof the yeast, form a sponge with 3 of the 5 cups of flour and all the other ingredients and let that sit for about half an hour. Then I add the last of the flour and kneed. This seems to work pretty well. I am out of wheat at the moment so have been making mostly spelt bread.
    Anne

  26. #26
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    OK here's the recipes I like. They come from the original DAK book. They are for a bread machine but can be baked normally. Some machines put ingredients in in a different order. This is how DAK does it. I only use the dough cycle and then knead, let rise, and in the case of the challah, braid, and then bake.

    Henzi"Seed Bread
    1 pkg yeast
    1 T sugar
    1 1/2 cups bread flour
    1 1/2 cups wheat flour
    2/3 cup rye flour
    1/2 cup cornmeal
    1/2 cup unprocessed bran
    1 tsp salt
    1/3 cup golden raisens
    1/3 cup chopped pecans or walnuts
    1/3 cup sunflower seeds
    1/3 cup poppy seeds
    2 T caraway seeds
    1 cup warm water
    1/3 cup warm milk
    1 T oil
    4 T honey
    1 egg

    Russian Black Bread

    1 pkg yeast
    1 T sugar
    1 1/2 cup bread flour
    1 1/2 cup medium rye
    1/4 cup whole wheat flour
    1/2 cup unprocessed bran
    1 T caraway seeds
    1 tsp salt
    1 tsp instant coffee
    1/4 tsp fennel seeds

    Heat the following until the chocolate and butter melt, cool, and then add to the batter.

    1 cup plus 2 T water
    2 T molasses
    2 T cider vinegar
    2 T butter
    1/2 oz. unsweetened chocolate

    Challah

    1 pkg yeast
    3 cups bread flour
    4 T sugar
    2 eggs
    6 T vegetable oil
    1 1/2 tsp salt
    1/4 cup warm water

    Whole wheat bread

    1 pkg yeast
    1/8 tsp ginger
    2 1/2 cup bread flour
    1 1/4 whole wheat flour
    1/2 cup wheat germ
    1 tsp salt
    3 T honey
    12 oz can evaporated milk
    2 T oil
    1/2 cup cracked wheat
    1/2 cup boiling water

    Note. Cover the cracked wheat with the boiling water and let cool before adding.

    These are the ones I make the most.

    Sami
    Don't give up, Moses was once a basket case.

  27. #27
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    yeast

    I have problems with yeast bread. I have tried the bread machine and it comes out like a rock as DH can atest to. I finally gave up the bread machine. I have better luck with the Fresh Apple Bread from CL.

    What am I doing wrong I even make sure to use fresh yeast!
    Leisa

  28. #28
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    Re: How many bread bakers do we have?

    Originally posted by Jasmine-Rose
    Is there a market for bread recipes here?

    Anyone want to share bread recipes or am I the only one with this obsession?

    I love bread so much I should really change my username to something like 'Bread Slut'. I'd love to talk dough. I'm now on my second bread machine (first one was a basic Zojirushi the next a Bread Man). I took a class with Lora Brody years ago. She has a few books out on bread machine baking. I've never tried making it by hand. Did you get a lot out of the King Arthur class? What did they teach? I'd be interested in some of the 'science' behind bread baking because I've been having a lot of problems with my bread over in Saudi. I get a lot of very dense, dry loaves. Unfortunately I don't have a lot of variety in the flours that are available to me nor do I have any clue what kind of wheat I'm using (don't read a speck of Arabic!). Oh well, I guess I won't be much help in sharing recipes if this thread takes off given my current limitations! I will enjoy lurking and collecting recipes though!
    Linda

    When I stand before God at the end of my life, I would hope that I would not have a single bit of talent left and I could say “I used everything you gave me.”

    Erma Bombeck

  29. #29
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    Re: yeast

    Originally posted by Leisa M
    I have problems with yeast bread. I have tried the bread machine and it comes out like a rock as DH can atest to. I finally gave up the bread machine. I have better luck with the Fresh Apple Bread from CL.

    What am I doing wrong I even make sure to use fresh yeast!
    If your bread is hard as a rock and doesn't rise I would think that the yeast has died. Do you use an instant read thermometer to teat the temperature of the liquid you use? You can always test with your wrist as well. If you post the recipe you used as well as how you make it I may be able to determine exactly what is going on.
    "Feelin' Guilty
    For finding a Cheerio in my bra and then going ahead and eating it." Dooce

  30. #30
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    love making bread. AAMOF, I forgot to put in some roasted red pepper and basil bread. darn.

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