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Thread: Acrylic nails - changing polish

  1. #1

    Acrylic nails - changing polish

    This may be a dumb question, but what is the safest way to change the color yourself when you have acrylic nails? I have tried both non-acetone and regular polish remover and suspect that doing so is loosening the back end of the nail. I am trying to go at least 3 weeks between fills (sooooooo sick of going for fills) but hate that little bare half moon at the back.
    Thanks, guys.
    "When you are in love with someone you want to be near him all the time, except when you are out buying things and charging them to him." Miss Piggy

  2. #2
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    Non-acetone Polish remover

    That's what I used. Depending on how they affix the acrylics (like, if you have tips) you can use the acetone.

    When I had my nails done, I never had tips put on, and I just used regular nail polish remover. Never harmed the nails or made them lift.

    You can get kits, by the way, to do the fills yourself, but it takes practice...
    Nothing in the history of mankind can foul things up quicker than a computer
    ......with the possible exception of tequila and handguns.
    --Anonymous

  3. #3
    Have you ever done the fills yourself? Also, do you have any favorite colors? I know this is a personal thing but I am getting so BORED! Reds seem pretty when they are first put on but after awhile make me feel like an old lady. Pale colors seem boring. Would love to find a pretty "caramel" but just can't seem to find that perfect shade.
    "When you are in love with someone you want to be near him all the time, except when you are out buying things and charging them to him." Miss Piggy

  4. #4
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    Originally posted by NancyR
    Have you ever done the fills yourself? Also, do you have any favorite colors
    I used to do my own fills. It does take practice, but isn't terribly hard. People who do the nails do say you should do them over completely from time to time.

    I don't have the acrylic nails any more (may go back to them; it was a problem of living somewhere where nice nail places were hard to find.)

    If you're looking for nice colors, why don't you go into a salon and check out the OPI colors. I like Sonora Sunset, which is a sort of mauve, very pretty. I also like Grand Central Carnation, which is a frosted, pinkish red. [I'm Not Really A Waitress[/b] is a good, dark red shade, too. But you want tans or caramels... See what they have.

    I like OPI because it stays on very well, whether or not you have acrylic nails, and their color selection is good.

    If you want a non-OPI color, try Revlon's Copperglaze Bronze (I think that's the name). Revlon lasts pretty well for me, too.
    Nothing in the history of mankind can foul things up quicker than a computer
    ......with the possible exception of tequila and handguns.
    --Anonymous

  5. #5
    Thanks, I'll check out those colors. I pretty much stick to OPI and will look for the Sonora Sunset. Grand Central Carnation is one of my favorites and will probably be my next change. Will also look for the Revlon color, sounds pretty.
    "When you are in love with someone you want to be near him all the time, except when you are out buying things and charging them to him." Miss Piggy

  6. #6
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    Check out the OPI Color Chart Their site also has links for OPI fall & winter 2002, european and south american collections. Prices are too high but great for color choices

  7. #7
    i swear by OPI. they are more expensive, but the colors are gorgeous, they go on so smoothly and last. i have OPI bottles from 5 years ago that still go on like new. if it was a drugstore nail polish, it would probably be goopy by now.

    i love to buy the "minis" by OPI. every new season they come out with 4 mini bottles for about $12 at ULTA. that way you can sample different colors. plus who ever uses a whole bottle of nail polish anyways! it would take me a decade to use a whole big bottle! i like the mini bottles better. the new collection right now is called "european", very earthy & pretty for fall.

    also, i mix my nail polish by layering. i have a deep purple that looks too dark by itself, and i have a coppery orange that is too orange by itself, but i layer them, one coat of purple with the copper on top. the colors sort of "set into each other" and produce a unique pretty color. try this method with different combinations until you find one you like.

    people always ask me what color nail polish i wear, and the nice thing is they cant run out and buy it because it is my creation!

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    I used to have my own nail shop. Be sure to use the non-acetone remover just to be safe. The remover doesn't cause lifting from the nail bed, but oil can! If you rub lotion on your hands try to work it down your fingers but don't let it get on top of the nail and into the nail groove or the cuticle area. Most lotions have oil in them that can seep under the acrylic and make them lift. Same thing with bath oils, make sure your hands aren't in the water for long.

    The only real problem with doing fills yourself is the sterilization factor. At the very least you should swab a Qtip with rubbing alcohol across the area to be covered in acrylic. Acrylic won't stick to a shiny surface, so gently remove the shine with an emery board, and swab the alcohol to sterilize and completely dry the nail bed. If your kit comes with a somewhat nasty smelling liquid labeled 'Primer' be sure to use it after the alcohol! Use a pair of nippers or clippers to chip away the acrylic that's lifting a bit (you can tell it's lifting because it's 'white' in patches) and clip ALL that has lifted. If you leave any pockets of air you run the risk of the nail not adhering as well as setting yourself up for a fungus! After clipping use the emery board to file down the chipped area a bit, and rough up the natural nail, use the alcohol and primer, then dab your acrylic. Keep your brush wet with the acrylic liquid and don't get too much on the cuticle itself 'cause it's painful to file or chip off of that area!

    When I had my Nail Studio in 1985 I charged $25 for a full set and $15 for a fill. I don't think the prices have gone up in nearly 20 years! Seems I see $12 fills around here all the time! I used almost exclusively OPI and Orly polishes back then and I still love their stuff.

    My advice is to let a manicurist do it and simply take a book to read if you get bored, but if you want to attempt it yourself just make sure you take the precautions! Good luck!
    ~ "The right shoe can change your life...."- Cinderella ~

  9. #9
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    Originally posted by Jewel
    I used to have my own nail shop.
    Wow! I knew someone around here would have all the info!

    Question:
    My nails grow quickly but tend to be thin. I want to get a new full set of acrylic nails (no tips, because they do tend to lift off) but I'm hesitating because I was told by someone that the entir acrylic nail has to be removed once or so a year. There goes my entire nail (they're thin).

    Is this in fact necessary?
    Nothing in the history of mankind can foul things up quicker than a computer
    ......with the possible exception of tequila and handguns.
    --Anonymous

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    Originally posted by beejayw1
    My nails grow quickly but tend to be thin. I want to get a new full set of acrylic nails (no tips, because they do tend to lift off) but I'm hesitating because I was told by someone that the entir acrylic nail has to be removed once or so a year. There goes my entire nail (they're thin).

    Is this in fact necessary?
    Picture your toenails freshly polished. You've polished them because it's summer and you know you're going to be wearing your sandals and showing your toes. You don't remove the polish at the end of summer, you just forget about it. Somewhere around February you actually notice your toes while you're in the shower...and you see that there is only about half of that polish is left! The nail is growing out and the polish is going with it.

    Assuming you're keeping your acrylic nails at the same length most of the time, that is exactly what will happen to your 'full acrylic nail'. You'll be filing that tip down every time you go for a fill, and eventually the only acrylic that you will have on your nail is the 'fill in' acrylic. If the fills are done correctly with no pockets or bubbles and the correct procedures are taken with the alcohol and primer disinfectant, the 'fill' acrylic should hold as well as the 'full set' acrylic. It's the same stuff, it's just applied a bit at a time instead of all at once!

    Some manicurists like to replace the entire nail to get rid of that natural nail underneath the acrylic in the area that you can see when you turn your hands over, called the 'free edge'. It's unsightly, and the nails don't stay on as well when there is a lot of natural nail free edge underneath it. It's stronger to have an acrylic nail only on that edge. Why? Because the natural nail will separate from the acrylic on the sides because the natural nail follows its own curvature when it grows out. When that manicurist put your original nails on she put a paper form under your nail that estimated how your nail would grow out, but each individual is different. Some nails grow out towards the left, some curve inward, some have a very deep curve and some have a shallow curve. When your natural nail grows out it's fighting the acrylic that is sitting on it. The acrylic is rigid, the natural nail is not, so it's going to try to go it's own way. When it does that, then separation will occur, water and dirt will get in the little cracks, and you run the risk of a fungal infection. It's so much cleaner and easier to simply cut away the natural nail underneath and start over. It's also more attractive.

    Don't ever be fooled into thinking that you are 'protecting' your natural nails with acrylic. I worked on too many women that said "I'm just going to wear these until my natural nails grow out". Ain't gonna happen. If your nails were thin before the acrylic they'll be thinner when the acrylic is removed. They'll peel, they'll split, and they will generally not look too good! This doesn't affect new growth, only the part of the nail that the acrylic was on. Between the roughing up of the natural nail, the primer and the acrylic, you're depleting your nails of some of the oxygen that they would normally get without it. Acrylic nails are NOT bad for you, but don't expect to take those nails off and have the nails of a hand model! You'll need to buff them and baby them for a few weeks until new growth comes in. I've never seen acrylic nails 'help' someone grow out they're own nails. They usually find that the acrylic is much easier to take care of. Polish flakes and chips off of natural nails because the nails 'gives' and bends and creates cracks. Because the acrylic doesn't bend, the polish will only wear off at the tips, and your manicure lasts so much longer! Good luck!
    ~ "The right shoe can change your life...."- Cinderella ~

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Houston, Texas
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    I've been wearing acrylic for about 5 years now. I love the fact that my nailpolish doesn't come off. I, too, hate going for the stupid refills, but just looking at my fresh pretty nails keeps me coming back. I just read a magazine or talk to the person next to me.

    I wear my nails really too short for acrylic so I do have some lifting from time to time, but I just use nail glue. I have a great nail technician who manages to make them stay for the most part. She checks each nail each time and if she thinks it needs to come off, she takes it off. She's really fast, too. Does it in 40 min. unless she has to go chipping away at them...

    Warning: if you notice that your nail beds have pretty deep ridges in them, switch technicians. Also, if your acrylic is thick, switch techs. The cover should be smooth and even...

    As far as changing polish -never have to. I use that Revlon top coat and my nail polish never comes off unless I cut it w/a knife

  12. #12
    I knew if I posted this I would get some really informative responses and I have. Thanks to all of you for your great info and ideas. I learned a lot about acrylic nails. Yes, I too wear them only because I can't keep polish on any other way. I don't think I will attempt doing my own fills.
    While I am at it I would like to share a hot new tip for anyone who is interested. My Mom commented to her dermatologist that her nails just would not grow well in spite of tryng every strengthener on the market. He suggested something that the pharmacist had to special order called DermaNail and it had really worked!!!!! You apply it to the cuticle twice a day so it takes a LONG time for results (the whole nail had to grow out) but like I said it worked for her. There is a number on the bottle (1-800-533-SKIN) and aslo a website that I have not personally checked www.sumlab.com. Please let me know if anyone trys it..........would like to hear if it works for you (and I have NO vested interest in it, believe me).
    "When you are in love with someone you want to be near him all the time, except when you are out buying things and charging them to him." Miss Piggy

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