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Thread: what kind of pie plate?

  1. #1
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    what kind of pie plate?

    I am attempting my first pie (pumpkin) and wanted to know what type of pie plate to buy. Glass? metal? How do you decide? I am not as worried about appearances as much as I worry about my pie being edible! Thanks for the help...

  2. #2
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    I've been using glass pie plates for years and have had great results from them. I recently bought a stoneware pie plate from King Arthur but haven't tried it yet. I hear they're great too.

  3. #3
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    I also prefer glass or ceramic to metal pie plates.
    Well-behaved women seldom make history!

  4. #4
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    Question america's test kitchen said...metal!

    should i listen to them?

    i read on epicurious.com that metal pans are best for crusts that need to brown a lot, like a merangue pie crust, or a cheesecake crust.

    and that glass is best for covered fruit pies

    my mom said she likes pyrex because you can look through it.
    in general i prefer to bake with aluminum, tin, or stainless steel pans.

    asile
    latest improv:
    Light pasta primavera:
    Shells, fresh corn, chopped zucchini, fresh basil, in a vinegrette of white wine, dijon mustard, and olive oil --garnished with grated fresh parmisiano reggiano cheese...YUM!

  5. #5
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    I always used a pyrex pie plate and then bought a Longeberger pie plate. I was invited to a party when I first moved here, not knowing what it was, hated the baskets, so I bought a pie dish instead. It makes nice pies, but I would prefer a PC one instead since I like their stoneware.

    But in response to your question, 615bride, the dish won't matter all that much, really. Even the frozen pie shells that come in the foil poie plate can be good if the recipe is good. I'd say buy what you can afford and what you like.

  6. #6
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    Thanks! Everyone here is so helpful. It looks like I'll start out with a Pyrex if there is no difference in baking time/results...

  7. #7
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    No!!!!!!!! Don't!!!!!!! Unless you want soggy pastry? If your pastry is going on the bottom of the dish, like a tart or a quiche, then go, ALWAYS, for a metal container. If you're making a deep-dish pie with pastry just on the top, then pottery or glass is fine - otherwise - NO!!!!!!!!

  8. #8
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    I may have to switch to metal...I use pyrex and almost always end up with a soggy crust

    I just received a beautiful Emille Henre(sp?) clay/ceramic pie pan...but so far have only used it for crustless quiche.

    I just ordered an Anniversary pan from Le Creuset made for Tarte Tatins, but because it's cast iron, I wonder how well it would work for crusts!!!! DH is nagging me to bake something again, so I'll post back.
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

  9. #9
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    okay, now I'm confused. I assumed there would be some difference between metal, ceramic and glass. I will mostly be making pies with crust on the bottom such as that gingersnap crust pumpkin pie. There must be a baking difference between in metal and glass, no? Anyone else want to weigh in?

  10. #10
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    Well, this is obviously going to be one of those questions that will not be answered unless you bake the exact same pie, in the same conditions with the same ingredients using different pie plates. I can make a pie crust from the same recipe as you, and it can turn out differently.

    We all mix our ingedients a little more or little less than the next person, a little faster or slower that the next person, or when we roll out the dough, a little thinner or thicker than the next person. Also, what is a soggy pie crust to one person, may not be so soggy to the next. Our apples may be juicier this time than last time, making the crust soggy.

    I don't think this is an exact science. Also, if there was going to be a big difference in the outcome of the recipe, don't you think the recipes themselves would suggest what type of pie plate to use? I don't think I have ever seen a recipe that did that. Has anyone?

  11. #11
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    Okay, more confusion:

    www.weddingchannel.com
    Q- How do I know which pie plate to use?

    A - You need to use a standard glass or dull metal plate if you want your pie to be nicely browned on the bottom and top. Shiny metal pans, which are great for crumb crust pies, can create soggy bottoms. Also, research the size of ceramic and pottery pie plates as they may differ from the standard size, which hold 3 3/4 cups of liquid. If your plate holds more or less, adjust the filling and baking time

    www.whatscookingamerica.net/piecrsthint.htm
    Use a glass pie plate or a dull metal pie plate for making pies. The shiny metal pans keep the crust from browning properly. If using a glass pie plate, reduce the oven temperature by 25 degrees. Do not oil or grease pie plates.

    www.epicurious.com
    Pie Pans - WHAT THEY ARE
    Just to get things straight at the start: For me, a pie dish is made of glass or ceramic; a pie pan, of metal. Unlike a tart pan, which is often made in France, associated with French pastries and possessed of militarily precise straight or sharply fluted sides, a pie dish has sides that flare outward. I don't think the slope has a particular function, but it's traditional. On the other hand, the rim around the top of the dish has an important job — it supports the pert, pretty pinches, flutes and tines-of-the-fork pressings that seal the top crust to the bottom. Every once in a while you may come across a dish with an extra-wide rim and sometimes a trough — it's a juice-catcher, and I've never found it helpful. All those stuck-on juices don't look great when you bring the dish to the table — and pies always come to the table in their dishes. For the same catch-ability, put the dish on a foil-lined baking sheet.

    WHY YOU NEED THEM
    You can use the standard pie dish or pan for a pie with bottom and top crusts, bottom crust and lattice top, or bottom crust only. Of course, you can make a pie, sweet or savory, that has just a top crust, but that is often a deep-dish pie, with more filling than a regular one, and it's best made in a deep-dish pie dish. Whereas the standard model has sides that are less than 1 1/2 inches high, a deep-disher has higher, straighter sides and, consequently, greater capacity.

    PYREX AND POTTERY DISHES
    If you're going to buy only one pie dish or pan, I suggest an available-everywhere Pyrex dish for its efficiency, durability and low cost — an ideal trio. Because ovenproof glass conducts heat evenly, the Pyrex dish is particularly well suited for double-crusted pies that bake a long time. There are no hot spots, so a burned bottom is almost an impossibility.

    You can get similar usability in an often more attractive ceramic pie dish. Like Pyrex, ceramic or pottery is also best when you don't need to brown a bottom crust deeply. I like to use this type of pie dish when I'm making a crisp, crumble or dessert that doesn't depend on a well-done bottom crust.

    WHEN METAL IS BETTER
    With a Pyrex pie dish or two in your cupboard, you're good-to-go. But to be really pie-prepared, I'd purchase a deep-disher — again, Pyrex makes an admirable model — and a couple of metal pans. I reach for my metal pans when I'm making open-face pies. Metal withstands high heat, and sets and browns crusts pronto. It's this quick set that makes metal great for custard and cream pies, and pies that don't have to spend a lot of time in the oven. I'll save my Pyrex for the apple.

    CLEANING TIPS
    Ceramic, pottery and Pyrex pie dishes are super-easy to clean. You can wash them with hot, soapy water, use a gentle scrubbing pad or even pop them into the dishwasher. Although I hate the cleanup metal requires — you've got to wash it by hand, take care not to scratch it, then dry it immediately so it won't rust — it's the pan for lemon meringue and pumpkin-chiffon at Thanksgiving.

    — Adapted from an article by Dorie Greenspan, Bon Appιtit, October 1999

  12. #12
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    My favorite pie pan is a hand made pottery one. I also have a couple of pyrex. I never have a problem with soggy crusts. I also bake professionally for a bakery and we use disposable aluminum tins. In my opinion, just buy what appeals to you. Making pies should be fun (remind me of that by the time I make it to Thanksgiving ) Just whip it up, don't fret about it too much or you'll make it tough, patch if you need too, and have lots of whipped cream or ice cream on hand!

  13. #13
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    I'm getting myself a ceramic pie plate this year, as soon as I find one at a bargain price at TJ Maxx or someplace like that.
    The one I want is the Emile Henry 9 inch in either red or blue, and they seem to cost about $30 US. I've heard they give a superb result, and I think it would make a good Christmas present for me.

    I've been using either a Pyrex pan or a standard cake pan (with straight sides) in recent years. I tend to prefer the cake pan, since it holds more filling. I've read that if you bake the crust 'blind' i.e., empty, to fill with a pudding or other type filling, that the crust will shrink more in a glass pan than in other types. This seems true to me, but I haven't baked many pies in recent years, and when I have, I've used a metal cake pan, so don't really have a comparison to share.
    Anna
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    A fruit is a vegetable with looks and money.
    Plus, if you let fruit rot, it turns into wine,
    something Brussels sprouts never do.
    P. J. O'Rourke, humorist
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  14. #14
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    How funny, I literally just finished watching America's Test Kitchens, which is produced by the editor of Cook's Illustrated magazine, and the topic was "pies!" One part of the show revolves around equipment, so naturally they chose pie plates this episode. The one they had the best and most consistent results with was the Pyrex glass dish. The more expensive ones (like the ceramic Emile Henry (sp?)) didn't fare as well, and they thought were too deep for a regular pie.

    So that's my 2 cents! I think they have a website that covers each episode (it's something like americastestkitchens.com) and they should post the recipes they used, which in my experience are always divine! On the pie episode, they made a pumpkin and pecan pie.

  15. #15
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    I just made my first pumpkin pie and used the old metal pie pan.

    BUT, what I made sure to do, and am suggesting to you, is:
    I placed the pie on a cookie sheet to bake it.

    The cookie sheet keeps the bottom from heating too fast.

    Whatever pan you might use, you might consider doing this.


    Nefertete
    The mind knows what the heart enjoys.

    "I regret that I have but one life to give for my cuisine."

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