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Thread: Parchment Paper vs. Wax Paper or Foil

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
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    Question Parchment Paper vs. Wax Paper or Foil

    When making things like Oven Fried Chicken (4-02 p 92), how vital is it to use parchment paper to line the baking sheet? I tried this recipe with nothing and of course it was ridiculously hard to clean. Would it be okay with foil or wax paper?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
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    Centennial, CO
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    I don't think wax paper would be a good idea, as it can burn in the oven. Parchment paper is specially designed so that it won't burn. As for foil, I don't know why it wouldn't work, but maybe someone else does.

    Hope that helps!
    Wherever you go, no matter what the weather, always bring your own sunshine. --Anthony J. D'Angelo, The College Blue Book

    Vacuuming in high heels

  3. #3
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    I haven't made the oven fried chicken so I can't really say. I will warn you that I tried using wax and I could smell it melting on my pizza pan when I was making spiced pecans. I don't know if foil would stick to the chicken or not. I broke down and bought parchment just so I'd have one less thing to worry about.
    You can't drink rum on the beach all day if you don't start in the morning.

  4. #4
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    Here's the info from the Reynolds Cut-Rite site:

    Cut-Rite® Wax Paper may be used as a liner in baking cakes, quick breads, muffins or any baked food in which the batter completely covers the wax paper lining. Wax paper should never be directly exposed to the heat of an oven.
    Well-behaved women seldom make history!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2002
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    You might try some of the Reynolds non stick foil, or spray the foil lightly with Pam spray. I bought a roll of parchment from KA. much cheaper than buying those packages with a couple sheets. Anything is better than scraping and scrubbing. Agree with sneezles. wax paper only if completely covered by cake batter!

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Foil works just fine. I almost never have parchment, except around the holidays for baking, and I never have problems with the foil. occassionally it will stick to the fried chicken, but it peels right off, and clean-ups a breeze. I think that with parchment, there's just no chance of it sticking to the food.

  7. #7

    Cool

    mrs waz,

    Did you use foil for the recipe in the April issue? The reason I'm wondering has to do with the following thread:

    http://community.cookinglight.com/sh...nt+AND+chicken

    In my opinion, I'd assume parchment to be the only logical choice for this recipe, since foil--being nonporous-- would not allow absorption of oil or juices and also serves to reflect back some of the heat from the oven.

    But then again, maybe I don't know what I'm talking about...

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    Upstate SC
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    I've never understood why grocers seem to think people use parchment paper only during baking season. I learned 4 or 5 years ago to stock up on my parchment paper when it's readily available in the stores so I don't have to search for it in the summer. Reynolds makes a box that's probably less than $3 a roll. I sometimes wonder how I ever baked without this stuff!!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
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    CT
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    I would use a Silpat or Exopat and never have to search for "off-season" parchment paper again. Nothing ever sticks on my Silpat.

    Jane

    Silpat:
    "Our most popular item, the Silpat® is a must for any patisserie chef or home baker. The flat, non stick baking pan liner is ideal for baking cookies and patisseries. Place the silpat on any surface when working with sticky materials such as batter, taffy, caramel, or anything your imagination allows. It won't stick, and it will save you a mess! Silpat® does not need to be greased, saving both time and money.
    You may have seen similar products, but the Silpat® is the original non stick silicone baking mat, first introduced in France in 1982 by our founder Guy Demarle. They are made of fiberglass and silicone. Silpat®s have a life of 2,000 to 3,000 times.*
    Our products conform to US regulations on food grade silicone, and are FDA, NSF®, and Kosher certified.

    Can be used at temperatures varying from -40°C to 250°C
    -40°F to 482°F"


    Exopat:
    "Prevents cookies from sticking while baking; can also be used in roasters
    Eliminates need for parchment paper or nonstick cooking surfaces
    Made of slippery silicone; wipes clean with sponge
    Heat-safe to 580 degree F; can be used 2,000 times or more
    Measures 16-1/2 inches by 11-5/8 inches" From Amazon.com

  10. #10
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    I use my Silpat and Expat in baking, but if you put chicken on it, I am fearful that the odor of the chicken will stay on the silpat and then would not be good for cookies. I wish they would make a silpat for cake pans,

    Sami
    Don't give up, Moses was once a basket case.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
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    CT
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    I actually have an extra Silpat that I reserve for savory things like fried chicken, bagel bites and oven-roasted potatoes

    Jane

  12. #12
    Jane, do the potatoes crisp up. How about the chicken. I never thought about using it for anything but cookies. They don't stick at all??

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
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    CT
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    It really works well. Nothing has stuck yet!

    I usually spray a tiny bit of oil on my fries and they crisp up beautifully. The "unfried" chicken also comes out crispy on the side that isn't touching the baking sheet. I usually turn it over to crisp the 2nd side and then I drain it on paper towels before serving (if it is the store-bought frozen kind).

    Jane

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