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Thread: Seedless raspberry jam?

  1. #1
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    Seedless raspberry jam?

    A question for you all -- most baking recipes that call for raspberry jam sepecify for it to be seedless. Is that for any particular reason? Or is it more a matter of taste? For some reason I'm finding it hard to find seedless raspberry jam. I don't mind the seeds, but if something happens to them during the baking process that makes them taste bad, I don't want to take a chance.

    Thanks for the help!

  2. #2
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    While I love, love love raspberries and don't mind them in fresh ones the pips really bother me in jam or jellies. I don't know if it has anything to do with altering the finished product but my guess would be those pips would be very annoying! JMHO!
    Well-behaved women seldom make history!

  3. #3
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    It's purely a preferance of whether or not you like getting those darn things stuck in your teeth.

    In baking, I usually take plain old raspberry jam and press it through a sieve, weeding out the seeds. I can't say that I've actually looked for a seedless jam. But it takes no time to press it through, and saves me hours of flossing and picking later.

  4. #4
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    pips?

    I have never heard that term.

    I don't mind the seeds. I think the recipes that call for seedless are just doing that because the seeds could bother some people (appearance/taste). I personally would use whatever I could find.

  5. #5
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    I've always used raspberry jelly (seedless) cause I've never seen seedless jam. Is there a significant difference between jam and jelly?. I like the seeds but some things they are not good in, like a glaze.

  6. #6
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    Originally posted by valchemist
    pips?

    I have never heard that term.
    Well, it has to do with a Sherlock Holmes story "The Man with the Twisted Lips" and the pips from an orange and a guy from Texas...so we have always called them pips!
    Well-behaved women seldom make history!

  7. #7
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    Just thought I would let you know that Smuckers makes a seedless red raspberry jam:-) Usually their products are easily accessible
    Tara

  8. #8
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    I've used both seedless and seeded jam in recipes that call for seedless, and did not notice much difference at all. If you don't personally mind the seeds (which I don't), I wouldn't bother with the seedless.

    Kristal

  9. #9
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    When I make my own, I make mostly seedless so my mom can eat it and so it makes pretty cookies. I think the seedless is just to not have the texture of the seeds in the middle of what is usually a tender cake or cookie. The seeds do not become bitter or anything (they are already cooked in the jam). I have noticed that finding the seedless can be a little more challenging, especially during baking season. Our closest store usually has only one brand of seedless -- the store brand or sometimes Smuckers, and at least half a dozen with seeds.

  10. #10
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    This is a big help -- thanks all!

  11. #11
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    I prefer the seedless only because it looks better in the dessert as well. I buy Smucker's or the local Kettle Kitchen Village brand made in good old Intercourse, PA. When I lived in Canada, I loved the ED Smith Brand. It does exist, you just have to be on the lookout for it.

  12. #12
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    Originally posted by sneezles


    Well, it has to do with a Sherlock Holmes story "The Man with the Twisted Lips" and the pips from an orange and a guy from Texas...so we have always called them pips!
    ok! now it is crystal clear. (scratching head)

  13. #13
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    It's a British term for "seeds" in fruit.

  14. #14
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    Originally posted by valchemist
    I don't mind the seeds. I think the recipes that call for seedless are just doing that because the seeds could bother some people (appearance/taste). I personally would use whatever I could find.
    My mom has had diverticulitis (sp?) -- it's an icky condition where the lining of your intestine gets kind of ragged and things like seed can stick in it and really cause a lot of distress. I've heard conflicting information about the "seeds" issue, but anecdotally, if my mom stays away from nuts, seeds and "itty bitty foods," she feels a lot more comfortable.
    "I cook with wine; sometimes I even add it to the food."
    ---W.C.Fields

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