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Thread: ISO Old Fashoned HEAVY white cake with Brown sugar cooked fudgelike frosting

  1. #1
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    ISO Old Fashoned HEAVY white cake with Brown sugar cooked fudgelike frosting

    My best friend in school was from Missippi. Her mother made a cake that was heavy as lead, ugly, and tasted like heaven. She made it two layers frosted by a fudgelike brown sugar cooked frosting. I would love to be able to make it myself. Just the thought of it makes me long for those old days.
    The difference between what I am and what I want to be is what I do.

  2. #2
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    There is a recipe for Seven Minute Sea-Foam Icing in the Joy of Cooking. It has 1 1/2 cups brown sugar, egg whites and is cooked in a double boiler; says it's sufficient for the tops and sides of two 9-inch layers. Would that be something close?
    And there is a recipe for a butter cake that makes 3 8-inch layers or a 9x13.
    The Wilton cake site also has a butter cake that is very heavy with butter but oh so delicious.
    Can post any of these if you are interested.
    Well-behaved women seldom make history!

  3. #3
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    myrnas,

    Did the icing actually have cocoa or chocolate in it? Or was it more a brown sugar/toffee/butterscotch sort of thing with a fudge-like texture?
    Could it be a 'burnt-sugar' icing? I can't remember eating one, but I've heard they're divine.

    I don't make active use of such a recipe, but your post has me curious. I'll certainly check out my cookbooks for something similar.

    Do let me know a bit more about the icing.
    Anna
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    A fruit is a vegetable with looks and money.
    Plus, if you let fruit rot, it turns into wine,
    something Brussels sprouts never do.
    P. J. O'Rourke, humorist
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

  4. #4
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    There is also Brown Sugar Hard Sauce...
    Well-behaved women seldom make history!

  5. #5
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    I don't know where to find the recipe(s) you are after, but I just had to pipe up and say -- it sounds FABULOUS!

  6. #6
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    Re: ISO Old Fashoned HEAVY white cake with Brown sugar cooked fudgelike frosting

    Originally posted by myrnas
    My best friend in school was from Missippi. Her mother made a cake that was heavy as lead, ugly, and tasted like heaven. She made it two layers frosted by a fudgelike brown sugar cooked frosting. I would love to be able to make it myself. Just the thought of it makes me long for those old days.
    Hi there Myrnas

    That cake does sound like something else - despite its sex appeal

    Here is a recipe that really sounds like it might work for ya. Though I'm not quite sure if the cake you're looking for had all these things in it, I'm sure that what this recipe does include helps to make the cake quite heavy.

    ... this one is a recipe from Mississippi actually ...

    Amalgamation Cake

    1 (18.25 ounce) package white cake mix*
    8 egg yolks
    2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
    2 cups white sugar
    1 cup butter
    2 cups chopped walnuts
    2 cups chopped pecans
    2 1/2 cups raisins
    1 (14 ounce) package flaked coconut

    1 cup white sugar
    1/2 cup hot water
    2 egg whites

    * I didn't say you wouldn't be cheating making this recipe

    Directions:

    1 Bake white cake mix, following package directions, in two layers (either 8 or 9 inch).
    2 Filling: In a double boiler, combine egg yolks, flour, 2 cups sugar and butter. Cook, stirring, until thick.
    3 Add walnuts, pecans, raisins and coconut. Mix well. Spread filling between layers, on sides and top of cooled cake.
    4 Icing: Combine sugar and water in a saucepan; stir until well blended. Boil slowly without stirring until mixture will spin a long thread when a little is dropped from a spoon (hold the spoon high above saucepan), or reaches 238 - 242 degrees F (114 - 117 degrees C).
    5 In a large bowl, beat egg whites with a mixer until they are stiff, but still moist. Pour hot syrup slowly over egg whites while beating. Continue until mixture is very fluffy, and will hold its shape. Spread over cake.

    GOOD LUCK!

    Kayla
    “When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be”

  7. #7
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    Thanks everyone. Just noticed that I flunked third grade spelling of Mississippi. Sorry! However, the icing was made in an iron skillet with butter and sugar that came out tasting like penuche or a light brown fudgey texture.

    Lil Bit, there was not any chocolate.

    Kayla, that Amalgamation Cake sounds like a rock. Someday I will put that together JUST FOR FUN. Will review.

    Thanks to all of you, I just love you all and how ready you are to help everyone.
    The difference between what I am and what I want to be is what I do.

  8. #8
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    I do believe that my mom made something like that a few times when I was growing up. I'm thinking that CL has done a recipe like that in the last few years although the icing may not have been cooked. I will do some looking and post again later.

    Laura

    Editing to say that I found the recipe(Old-Fashioned Caramel Layer Cake) from the magazine and then found that it has been posted and reviewed on the boards. Thanks to Pat! I hope I can make this link work.

    Laura

    http://community.cookinglight.com/sh...mel+Layer+Cake

    (Okay, the first time I managed to make a link to my yahoo e-mail! Geez, I'm nuts!)
    BACON - A Los Angeles librarian reports she finally found it necessary to revoke a gentleman's library card. Because her repeated letters to him, telephone calls, and face-to-face pleas still failed to break him of the peculiar habit of using strips of raw bacon as bookmarks.

    -Boyd's Book of Odd Facts

  9. #9
    Myrna,

    This isn't the EXACT same recipe that you're looking for, but the icing is similar, quick, and unbelievably good. This is a Cake Mix Doctor recipe. It's not light.

    Caramel Cake

    Recipe courtesy of Ann Byrn's The Cake Mix Doctor (Workman, 2000)

    Solid vegetable shortening for greasing the pans
    Flour for dusting the pans
    1 package (18.25 ounces) plain white cake mix
    1 cup whole milk
    8 tablespoons (1 stick) butter, melted
    3 large eggs
    2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
    Quick Caramel Frosting (see below)

    Place a rack in the center of the oven and preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Generously grease two 9-inch round cake pans with solid vegetable shortening, then dust with flour. Shake out the excess flour. Set the pans aside.

    Place the cake mix, milk, melted butter, eggs, and vanilla extract in a large mixing bowl. Blend with an electric mixer on low speed for 1 minutes. Stop the machine and scrape down the sides of the bowl with a rubber spatula. Increase the mixer speed to medium and beat 2 minutes more, scraping the sides down again if needed. The batter should look well blended. Divide the batter between the prepared pans, smoothing it out with the rubber spatula. Place the pans in the oven side by side.

    Bake the cakes until they are golden brown and spring back when lightly pressed with your finger, 27 to 29 minutes. Remove the pans from the oven and place them on wire racks to cool for 10 minutes. Run a dinner knife around the edge of each layer and invert each onto a rack, then invert them again onto another rack to that the cakes are right side up. Allow them to cool completely, 30 minutes more.

    Meanwhile, prepare the Quick Caramel Frosting.

    Place one cake layer, right side up, on a serving platter. Spread the top with the warm frosting. Place the second layer, right side up, on top of the first layer and frost the top and sides of the cake with clean, smooth strokes. Work quickly, as the frosting will set. (If the frosting gets too hard to work with, place the pan back over low heat for 1 minute, stirring constantly, to soften it up.) Once the frosting has set, slice and serve.

    Store this cake, covered in plastic wrap or aluminum foil, at room temperature for up to 1 week or freeze, wrapped in foil, for up to 6 months. Thaw the cake overnight on the counter before serving.


    Quick Caramel Frosting
    8 tablespoons (1 stick) butter
    1/2 cup packed light brown sugar
    1/2 cup packed dark brown sugar
    1/4 cup whole milk
    2 cups confectioners' sugar, sifted
    1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract


    Place the butter and brown sugars in a medium-size heavy saucepan over medium heat. Stir and cook until the mixture comes to a boil, about 2 minutes. Add the milk, stir, and bring the mixture back to a boil, then remove the pan from the heat. Add the confectioners' sugar and vanilla. Beat with a wooden spoon until the frosting is smooth.

    Use immediately (while still warm) to frost the cake of your choice or the frosting will harden. If it does harden while you are frosting the cake, simply place the pan back over low heat and stir until the frosting softens up.

    Makes 3 cups, enough to frost a 2- or 3-layer cake

  10. #10
    Myrnas,

    Here's another one that sounds like what you're looking for. This is actually a Southern Living recipe, but someone entered it into "Recipezaar.com". Click here for the recipe.

    http://www.recipezaar.com/search/get...id=50069&path=

  11. #11
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    I am not familiar with the cake, but here is an icing recipe made in an iron skillet.

    Caramel Icing

    2 1/2 cups sugar
    1 stick margarine
    3/4 cup milk


    Cook 1/2 cup of sugar in an iron skillet until brown. Stir constantly. Melt 2 cups sugar in milk. Add caramelized sugar to milk mixture. Cook until it forms a soft ball. Remove from heat & add margarine. Beat until it cools & loses gloss. Spread on cake.

  12. #12
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    This weekend will be "Heavy as lead" cake marathon. Thank you so much for your input. I will review next week.
    The difference between what I am and what I want to be is what I do.

  13. #13
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    Originally posted by myrnas
    This weekend will be "Heavy as lead" cake marathon. Thank you so much for your input. I will review next week.
    Lol... Have fun!

  14. #14
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    Originally posted by myrnas
    This weekend will be "Heavy as lead" cake marathon. Thank you so much for your input. I will review next week.
    I'd love to be there to help with the baking and tasting!

  15. #15
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    The baking is done, the icing is cooked, it looks ugly as I remembered and tonite we will give it a try. I am so tempted to cut into it, but friends are coming tonite and I would be embarrased to have a chunk out....More later when the eating is done. Thanks for the input of all of you. I used the link given by Laura. Will let you all know tonight.
    The difference between what I am and what I want to be is what I do.

  16. #16
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    Oh, myrnas, I forgot to mention!

    I'm sorry not to get back to you. I never did get a chance to review my cookbooks, but the cakes I remember seem really very similar to the on in the link that claire797 put up.

    I hope the cake is divine, it certainly sounds great!

    Anna
    Anna
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    A fruit is a vegetable with looks and money.
    Plus, if you let fruit rot, it turns into wine,
    something Brussels sprouts never do.
    P. J. O'Rourke, humorist
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

  17. #17
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    Heavey as lead cake review:

    The cake was very good. It was very much like I had remembered from my childhood. I used the link from LauraBL. It seemed to get better and more moist each day that it survived. It is all gone now. Thanks for all the help. I might note that it was easy to do from scratch and used normal ingredients I always have on hand. This is a keeper for times when I need to touch the past....however, it certainly is not LIGHT! Now that I am over that longing, I am now back on WW this week. Thanks to all for the input and help. You are all great!
    The difference between what I am and what I want to be is what I do.

  18. #18
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    thanks for posting the review!

  19. #19
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    mymas,
    The April/May issue of Saveur has a recipe for Lane Cake, which might be what you were looking for, in an article on Southern cooking. I see you found something close but I remembered your post when I saw the cake, so thought I'd pass the info along.

  20. #20
    Originally posted by wonderwoman
    mymas,
    The April/May issue of Saveur has a recipe for Lane Cake, which might be what you were looking for, in an article on Southern cooking. I see you found something close but I remembered your post when I saw the cake, so thought I'd pass the info along.
    Isn't Lane Cake the one that uses a billion egg yolks or am I thinking of Lord Baltimore Cake?

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