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Thread: Can I substitute all-purpose flour for bread flour?

  1. #1

    Question Can I substitute all-purpose flour for bread flour?

    I want to make some maple-oatmeal bread tomorrow (I think I got the recipe from this board, but I'm not sure who posted it, sorry!), and I do not have bread flour, nor do I want to run out to the store. Is there a big difference between bread flour and all-purpose? Do I substitute in equal amounts? I can find info on substituting for cake flour, but not bread flour. Can anyone help? TIA!
    "live well, laugh often, love much"

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Marietta, Ga
    Posts
    7,693
    the site http://www.foodsubs.com indicates that you can do a straight sub.

    bread flour = hard-wheat flour = strong flour = high-gluten flour

    Notes: This flour has a high level of gluten, which gives bread more structure. Don't confuse it with gluten flour (also called vital wheat gluten), which is pure gluten and used as a bread additive or to make seitan.

    Substitutes: all-purpose flour (easier to knead; will result in smaller loaf; consider supplementing with gluten according to package directions or add 2 teaspoons per cup of flour)
    Notes: To see how to substitute other flours when making yeast breads, see the listing under all-purpose flour.

    Leigh
    "Mommy, Can we Please, Please, Please have spinach for dinner?" DD2(age 6)

  3. #3

    Thanks!

    Thank you for your prompt reply. Cool site, I bookmarked it for future use!
    "live well, laugh often, love much"

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Lone Star State
    Posts
    20,737
    To some degree, the sucess of a substitution will depend on where you live and what kind of all-purpose flour you get. In our area, Gold Medal unbleached all-purpose flour actually tested better for bread making than some bread flours. It has to do with the hardness and protien content of the wheat -- the harder, the more protien and the more gluten, the better for yeast bread.

  5. #5
    Beth - just curious. Does that hold true for all of Texas? Where did you see that?

    (trying to streamline my flour shelf)

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