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Thread: Recipe scaling help - or - how many cups in a pound of flour?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Danvers, MA
    Posts
    6,924

    Recipe scaling help - or - how many cups in a pound of flour?

    I'm trying to scale down Cinnamon Crazy's recipe for Portugese Sweet Bread to make 2 instead of 10 loaves.

    Does Mastercook scale? Can anyone input this into Mastercook for me and divide by 5 or 4?

    Otherwise, I can manually divide each ingredient, but I don't know how many cups are in a pound of flour.

    Can anyone suggest the best common denominator (5 or 4) for dividing these ingredients to get me close to 2 loaves?

    Thank you!!!!!

    Loren

    Here is Cinnamon Crazy's recipe:

    Aunt Connie's Portuguese Sweet Bread

    Serving Size : 10 loaves
    Categories : Breads

    Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    5 pounds bread flour (Sifted Better for Bread flour)
    4 cups sugar

    16 eggs
    1 tablespoon salt

    1 1/2 cups butter
    1/2 cup shortening

    4 packages yeast
    1 tablespoon flour
    plus
    2 teaspoons flour
    1 teaspoon sugar
    warm water

    1 cup warm milk
    2 cups warm water


    In a very large mixing bowl, mix the flour and sugar.
    In a separate bowl, beat the eggs until fluffy, then add the salt. Continue to beat for another minute.
    Over a burner, melt the butter with the shortening.
    In a small bowl, mix the yeast, flour, 1 tsp sugar and enough warm water to make a wet paste. (Not too thick and not too watery.) Cover with plastic wrap and allow it to rise in a warm place for 10-20 minutes. If it doesn't rise, then throw it away and start this step over with a new batch of yeast.
    Warm the 1 cup milk over the burner.
    After the yeast has risen, add the warmed milk to the flour and sugar mixture. Don't expose the yeast to air. Make sure flour is covering the yeast.
    Add the eggs and start mixing with your hands.
    Slowly add the warmed milk while mixing with your hands.
    After the milk is used up, slowly start adding the warm water. Keep mixing with your hands. This process takes approximately 15 minutes.
    Start to slowly add the warm butter/shortening little by little (make sure it is not too hot). Add butter, then mix with hands; add butter and miz some more. This process takes approximately 20 minutes.
    The dough should not be too sticky to your hands.
    Sprinkle flour over the top to check how it feels. It should feel soft and spring back like a feather pillow; not thick and tough.
    The dough will look elastic as you are mixing it. If it needs more liquid, add more milk or water. Milk will make the bread more rich, and water will make it fluffy.
    When the dough is all done, sprinkle flour around the edges and bottom and top so nothing sticks to the pan.
    Cover the dough with a light towel and wrap the bowl in warm blankets. Set the bowl in the warmenst place in the house. Don't put too much weight over the dough.
    After 2-3 hours, the dough should be double in size. Punch down with your hands to push out the air bubbles. Cover.
    Let rise for another 4-5 hours and it should double in size again. Punch down with hands.
    Grab a ball of dough from the pan (the size of 2-3 baseballs). Use a little flour so it doesn't stick to your hands. Take the ball and massage it a little to formulate the ball, then place it on a greased pie plate. Repeat with remaining dough. Let it rise for 5-9 hours.
    Heat oven to 300-350. When you place the bread in the oven, move the temperature down to 250-275. Bake for 40-60 minutes. The temperatures will vary depending on the oven.

    Tips
    Make sure all the ingredients used are at room temperature. Make sure none of the ingredients are too hot so that you don't kill the yeast. If the milk, butter, or water burns your hand, the it's too hot.
    You can use an electric blanket at a low setting for the bread to rise in a warm environment.
    Glass pie plates produce the best breads.
    Rising time vary so be patient.

    Makes 10 loaves
    The term "working mother" is redundant.

  2. #2
    Loren,

    I'm at work and so w/o my Mastercook, but this website has a nifty chart that gives food yields: www.cahe.nmsu.edu/pubs/_e/E-132.pdf

    According to the chart, 1 pound of sifted flour (bread or all-purpose) equals 4 cups. Unsifted and spooned into measuring cups, they give a yield of 3.5 cups per pound.

    I know that different bakers measure their flour differently- for some a cup of flour is 4 ounces, but for those who "dip and sweep" it can be as much as 5 ounces.

    I think your best bet would be to divide by 5- hopefully someone w/ access to Mastercook can plug in the recipe and give you a scaled version. Good luck!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Danvers, MA
    Posts
    6,924
    Stephanie - that's a wonderful resource! Between that and Sneezles' site that explains Baking dish size equivalents I've learned so much.

    I'm going to start dividing the ingredients, but if anyone is up to inputting this into Mastercook, I'd greatly appreciate the accuracy from that.

    Loren
    The term "working mother" is redundant.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Posts
    5,143
    Here you go, Loren. Good luck with that 3 1/4 eggs.


    * Exported from MasterCook *

    Aunt Connie's Portuguese Sweet Bread

    Recipe By :
    Serving Size : 2 Preparation Time :0:00
    Categories :

    Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    1 pound bread flour -- (Sifted Better for Bread flour)
    3/4 cup sugar
    3 1/4 eggs
    1/4 tablespoon salt
    1/3 cup butter
    1/8 cup shortening
    3/4 package yeast
    1/4 tablespoon flour
    3/8 teaspoon flour
    1/4 teaspoon sugar
    warm water
    1/4 cup warm milk
    3/8 cup warm water

    In a very large mixing bowl, mix the flour and sugar.
    In a separate bowl, beat the eggs until fluffy, then add the salt. Continue to beat for another minute.
    Over a burner, melt the butter with the shortening.
    In a small bowl, mix the yeast, flour, 1 tsp sugar and enough warm water to make a wet paste. (Not too thick and not too watery.) Cover with plastic wrap and allow it to rise in a warm place for 10-20 minutes. If it doesn't rise, then throw it away and start this step over with a new batch of yeast.
    Warm the 1 cup milk over the burner.
    After the yeast has risen, add the warmed milk to the flour and sugar mixture. Don't expose the yeast to air. Make sure flour is covering the yeast.
    Add the eggs and start mixing with your hands.
    Slowly add the warmed milk while mixing with your hands.
    After the milk is used up, slowly start adding the warm water. Keep mixing with your hands. This process takes approximately 15 minutes.
    Start to slowly add the warm butter/shortening little by little (make sure it is not too hot). Add butter, then mix with hands; add butter and miz some more. This process takes approximately 20 minutes.
    The dough should not be too sticky to your hands.
    Sprinkle flour over the top to check how it feels. It should feel soft and spring back like a feather pillow; not thick and tough.
    The dough will look elastic as you are mixing it. If it needs more liquid, add more milk or water. Milk will make the bread more rich, and water will make it fluffy.
    When the dough is all done, sprinkle flour around the edges and bottom and top so nothing sticks to the pan.
    Cover the dough with a light towel and wrap the bowl in warm blankets. Set the bowl in the warmenst place in the house. Don't put too much weight over the dough.
    After 2-3 hours, the dough should be double in size. Punch down with your hands to push out the air bubbles. Cover.
    Let rise for another 4-5 hours and it should double in size again. Punch down with hands.
    Grab a ball of dough from the pan (the size of 2-3 baseballs). Use a little flour so it doesn't stick to your hands. Take the ball and massage it a little to formulate the ball, then place it on a greased pie plate. Repeat with remaining dough. Let it rise for 5-9 hours.
    Heat oven to 300-350. When you place the bread in the oven, move the temperature down to 250-275. Bake for 40-60 minutes. The temperatures will vary depending on the oven.

    Tips
    Make sure all the ingredients used are at room temperature. Make sure none of the ingredients are too hot so that you don't kill the yeast. If the milk, butter, or water burns your hand, the it's too hot.
    You can use an electric blanket at a low setting for the bread to rise in a warm environment.
    Glass pie plates produce the best breads.
    Rising time vary so be patient.


    Yield:
    "2 loaves"

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 779 Calories; 46g Fat (51.9% calories from fat); 11g Protein; 84g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber; 377mg Cholesterol; 1025mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 1 1/2 Lean Meat; 0 Non-Fat Milk; 8 1/2 Fat; 5 1/2 Other Carbohydrates.


    Nutr. Assoc. : 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
    --Mary Kate--

    "In all our woods there is not a tree so hard to kill as the buckeye. The deepest girdling does not deaden it, and even after it is cut down and worked up into the side of a cabin it will send out young branches, denoting to all the world that Buckeyes are not easily conquered, and could with difficulty be destroyed." - Daniel Drake, 1833

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Danvers, MA
    Posts
    6,924
    Thank you Mary Kate!!!!!

    Loren
    The term "working mother" is redundant.

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