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Thread: New Blood Pressure levels

  1. #1
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    New Blood Pressure levels

    Has everyone heard that the new BP levels should be LESS than 120/80?
    just sharing
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

  2. #2
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    Really???? Where did you hear about that?

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    cnn, national news, websites, medical journals.....
    they won't put you on meds, but feel it's a wake-up call to healthier choices.
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

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    Oh good - so my 88/48 they measured last week in the hospital means I'm really healthy, eh?!

    (I had surgery two weeks ago and the next day, after getting up for the first time I completely passed out. After they revived me and got me back in bed, they measured my BP as 88/48!!) I guess I should be happy about it..... HA

  5. #5
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    Hmm, interesting. Nothing about it in the NZ media so far.

    Do you know what the new numbers are?

  6. #6
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    Originally posted by Grace
    Oh good - so my 88/48 they measured last week in the hospital means I'm really healthy, eh?!

    (I had surgery two weeks ago and the next day, after getting up for the first time I completely passed out. After they revived me and got me back in bed, they measured my BP as 88/48!!) I guess I should be happy about it..... HA
    You healthy thang, Grace you!

    Post-surgery, after lying in bed, blood pressure does tend to drop quite a bit, and when you stand up for the first time, everything goes haywire.

    I remember after I had major surgery, the first time they made me get out of bed I was so "seasick" - couldn't focus on anything, felt really nauseated - which much much later I found out was a normal blood pressure response.

    Would've been nice if someone had told me at the time - I thought they'd nicked some vital nerve to my eyes when it happened!!! (yes, I don't know how they would've managed that during abdominal surgery, but in my defence, I was doped to the eyeballs on morphine while I was having this panic!)

  7. #7
    Wanta hear a low bp? After I gave birth 9 weeks ago, I stood up to go to the bathroom a couple of hours later and almost passed out - my bp was 68/38! I've never felt so out of it in my life!
    Life is what we make it, always has been, always will be.

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  8. #8
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    Originally posted by Paula H
    Hmm, interesting. Nothing about it in the NZ media so far.

    Do you know what the new numbers are?
    THe report on the news said that arterial damage begins with pressures as low (or high ) as 115 over..i think it was 75

    I always have white coat hypertension, which now they say isn't a good thing either
    I'm fine when I test it at home (last night 107/70) but once I was in for a physical, they wouldn't let me leave right away it was so high
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

  9. #9
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    Here's the story from CNN.com


    Red flag raised over 'normal' blood pressure
    New guidelines: Risk starts at lower levels than once thought

    WASHINGTON (AP) --Millions of people who thought they had healthy blood pressure are about to get a surprise: The government says levels once considered normal or borderline actually signal "prehypertension," and those people must take care to stave off full-blown high blood pressure.

    It's a major change, in new federal guidelines being released Wednesday, that affects people with blood pressure as low as 120 over 80 -- once thought to be a good level but now considered not good enough.

    "We don't want to frighten the public, we want to get action. Even small changes in blood pressure are important," said Dr. Aram Chobanian, dean of the Boston University school of medicine and chairman of committee that wrote the guidelines.

    About 45 million Americans are in this prehypertensive range, says the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, which issued the new recommendations. The change comes from recent scientific studies showing the risk of heart disease begins at blood pressures lower than previously thought.

    Also in the guidelines:

    Most people who already have high blood pressure will need at least two medications to control the dangerous disorder.

    For the majority of patients, one of those drugs should be a cheap, old-fashioned diuretic.

    Blood pressure is measured as two values and the first, or top, number in the reading is the most important for anyone over age 50 -- something too few doctors and patients understand. If nothing else, that number should be below 140.

    The guidelines overall urge doctors to be far more aggressive in treating hypertension, noting that almost a third of people with high blood pressure don't even know it. Plus, two-thirds of diagnosed patients don't have the disease under control -- too often because doctors hesitate to prescribe a second or third medication, said Dr. Daniel W. Jones of the American Heart Association, a co-author of the guidelines.

    An estimated 50 million Americans have high blood pressure, often called the silent killer because it may not cause symptoms until the patient has suffered damage. It raises the risk of heart attacks, strokes, heart failure, kidney damage, blindness and dementia.

    A new normal
    High blood pressure measures 140 over 90 or more. That level hasn't changed.

    Until now, optimal blood pressure was considered 120 over 80 or lower; normal was up to 130 over 85; and levels above that were called borderline until patients reached the hypertension range.

    But the new guidelines classify normal blood pressure as below 120 over 80 -- and readings anywhere from 120 over 80 up to 140 over 90 as prehypertensive.

    "We hope it's going to catch people's attention," Jones said of the new prehypertension category. "This is not to alarm people but simply deliver the message that ... they are at higher risk for going on to develop hypertension and they need to take action."

    That doesn't mean medication. Instead, people with prehypertension should lose weight if they're overweight, get regular physical activity, avoid a salty diet and consume no more than two alcoholic drinks a day. All those factors increase blood pressure, the guidelines say.

    Recent scientific studies show that risk of heart disease actually begins rising once blood pressure creeps above 115 over 75, said guideline co-author Ed Roccella, a hypertension specialist at the heart institute.

    There's a doubling of risk for each 20-point rise in the top number, called the systolic pressure, or 10-point rise in the bottom number, the diastolic pressure.

    "Most of us will have hypertension if we live long enough," said Roccella. The hope is that if people know they're prehypertensive -- even if they're a skinny 20-something with 120 over 80 readings today -- they'll make wiser lifestyle choices and thus stave off the blood-pressure creep that comes with age.

    The guidelines will be published in next week's Journal of the American Medical Association, but because of their importance are being released early online Wednesday.
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

  10. #10
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    Normal for me is 80/60. I'm not real worried.
    "Is ice hockey hard? I don't know, you tell me. We need to have the strength and power of a football player, the stamina of a marathon runner and the concentration of a brain surgeon. But, we need to put all this together while moving at high speeds on a cold and slippery surface while 5 other guys use clubs to try and kill us. Oh, yeah, did I mention that this whole time we're standing on blades 1/8 of an inch thick. Is ice hockey hard? I don't know, you tell me. Next question."

  11. #11
    Maybe someday they'll discover that a decent diet and exercise are healthy.
    Chiropractic care is health care for the 21st century.

  12. #12
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    I have white coat hypertension, too. I don't see how that's such a bad thing since I only go to the dr like, twice a year, and it's normally pretty decent (106/68 or so). The highest it's ever measured was 180/120. It was at a dr that I hated (assigned by HMO), and he was physically restraining me to draw my blood (I was freaking out because he wouldn't explain to me why he wanted my blood---all he would say was "because you need a blood test"). I changed drs the second I got out of there. Anyway, even with the white coat hypertension, when I get it measured at the new doc, it's 116/66. Which I thought was good until I read the article .
    "It covers your bread like a stinkyfishy tarp
    I know it isn't butter
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  13. #13
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    My last physical in March measured 100/70 - that was the lowest I think I ever had. Ususally it was 115/80.

  14. #14
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    Originally posted by JHolcomb
    I have white coat hypertension, too. I don't see how that's such a bad thing since I only go to the dr like, twice a year
    The theory is that if a doc visit can shoot your BP up, other events throughout the day are also doing it. That people who are highly reactive like that are creating high blood pressure numerous times.

    I told DH he was gonna outlive me
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

  15. #15
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    Jen and Ana,

    My dad has the same problem. He finally got the DR to take him off his BP medication because he was just so tired all the time. He eats fairly well, doesn't drink (due to a head injury) and tries to get some exercise everyday. He's doing pretty well keeping it in the 130's (he is 65), but it's always high at the Dr's office. He has a BP thing and he can take it and get a reading in the 150's and two minutes later it's in the 130's. He can't figure that out?

    Leigh
    "Mommy, Can we Please, Please, Please have spinach for dinner?" DD2(age 6)

  16. #16
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    Several things to consider when doing BP checks at home.

    First, you should not run around and look for your equipment and then take it. Give yourself a few minutes to sit still before taking it.
    Second, make sure that the arm you are measuring is not higher or lower than the heart level.
    third, a new study suggests that 3 reading should be done on home monitors and the third is usually the most accurate
    fourth, people who have high BP should test first thing in the morning as that give their highest (and usually most accurate) reading. Have the equipment ready by the bedside.
    fifth, make sure the cuff size is proper for his arm size or he will get inaccurate readings.
    finally, if you're on aspirin therapy, it may be more beneficial to take the aspirin in the evening...something about the anti-inflammatory effects working after hours of being the system..so this would benefit the most in the mornings.

    if he is getting readings of 130's ...that is not good....maybe he should talk to his doc about switching to a different BP pill....they say good old diuretics work best and maybe that is all he would need to lower it further without getting tired.
    Last edited by wallycat; 05-16-2003 at 11:24 AM.
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

  17. #17
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    Originally posted by wallycat


    The theory is that if a doc visit can shoot your BP up, other events throughout the day are also doing it. That people who are highly reactive like that are creating high blood pressure numerous times.

    I told DH he was gonna outlive me
    What if it's the only thing that ever makes you feel nervous/out of control, though? I never feel that nervous at any other time, whether it's at work or when I'm stuck in traffic or whatever. Oh, actually, I get that nervous on an airplane, but I fly less than I see my dr. Not that I'm too concerned about a 116/66 reading, though...
    "It covers your bread like a stinkyfishy tarp
    I know it isn't butter
    But I can't believe it's carp!"

    Kenny Blankenship and Vic Romano, Most Extreme Elimination Challenge

  18. #18
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    I'm not sure that "feeling" nervous and having higher readings necessarily correlates. Yes, it contributes, but it's the autonomic nervous system that regulates this stuff. Meditation and deep breathing can help learn to control this part of the system, but it's one of those things that's on auto-pilot and we usually are unaware of what our readings are...that's why it's called the "silent killer."

    I guess the only way to know for sure what your readings are throughout the day is to wear one of those monitors for 24 hours and see what you get for a reading...
    The other is to do lots of deep breathing
    I think a 116/66 at DOCTOR's office is wonderful...I should be so lucky!!
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

  19. #19
    Oh goodie! More abnormalities to add to my list I swear, by the time I'm 40, EVERYONE is going to be on medication for high blood pressure.

    I know I am. If they make me any more nervous about going to the doctor, I'm probably gonna pop a blood vessel!

    Now, are eggs GOOD for me or BAD for me this week?
    It's so beautifully arranged on the plate - you know someone's fingers have been all over it. --Julia Child
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  20. #20
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    Originally posted by lorilei
    Oh goodie! More abnormalities to add to my list I swear, by the time I'm 40, EVERYONE is going to be on medication for high blood pressure.

    I know I am. If they make me any more nervous about going to the doctor, I'm probably gonna pop a blood vessel!

    Now, are eggs GOOD for me or BAD for me this week?
    Lorilei,
    I sometimes feel the same when I hear all the newest health blurbs. Still, most early hypertension is genetic --DH's brother was on BP pills when he hit 30, yet DH doesn't have it . Also, the older we get, the less elastic our arteries are and so the pressure goes up due to that...not to mention the stress of life piling up

    this week, eggs are great for us...unless......
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

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