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Thread: Over-risen Dough

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    1,108

    Post Over-risen Dough

    I love to make bagels, but do not have the consecutive time to mix the dough, let rise and bake them all at once. I usually put portions of dough in airtight baggies in the refrigerator overnight. After bringing to room temperature, they swell up with huge air bubbles. When I work with the dough, punching and shaping, any bubbles I push out just "slide" somewhere else in the dough and never go out. I've tried cutting the yeast to 3/4 tsp (1/3 pkg) and increasing the salt a little. It doesn't seem like a rising problem but a dough problem. Why won't the air bubbles punch out?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    pacific northwest
    Posts
    4,065

    Post

    AD your problem stumped me. I've made bagels a few times and have not had that problem, but then I don't think I've ever broken the process up (although I have done this often with other types of bread doughs).

    The only insight I could come across was that bagel dough is not suppose to rise much at all - in fact its only suppose to get a "half-proof" and do must of its rising/expanding in the boiling water. So my guess would be that the dough just can't rise that long.

    However, I think the solution is that you just shouldn't rise the dough vs. splitting into 2 days. I only let the dough "rest" about 10 minutes before shaping it (if I do the dough in the bread machine I remove it immediately after its done kneading) and then again only let it rise for 15-20 minutes before boiling and baking them. I use recipes from http://www.betterbaking.com/baker2/bagel2meth.html

    Kim

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    1,108

    Post

    Thanks for the response. I do not let the dough rise. The yeast shouldn't work in the refrigerator (especially as cold as mine is set). I did have success finally when I reduced the liquid. It seems the bread machine traps in all the moisture and steam, and the harder dough doesn't rise nearly as much. I think the liquid measurement may have been the problem. I use 334 grams (about 2 2/3 cups) flour, 3/4 cup water, 5 teaspoons honey and 1 teaspoon barley malt syrup. (I always weigh the flour in all recipes.) This seems to produce the best results.

  4. #4

    Post

    Actually, just FYI, dough can rise in the refrigerator - it just does it much more slowly than if left at room temp. I have several recipes that call for letting dough rise overnight in the fridge. I've always wanted to make my own bagels - maybe I'll add this to my "to-do" list for 2001! Thanks for the link RunnerKim - I'll have to check it out.

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