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Thread: What is your opinion about "color added" to salmon???

  1. #1
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    What is your opinion about "color added" to salmon???

    Here are links to a few articles about the subject.
    http://www.eurocbc.org/page925.html
    http://www.seafood.com/news/current/94835.html
    http://exchange.healthwell.com/nfm-o...n_03/news2.cfm

    and a quote as to why

    One industry official said the two chemicals that turn salmon's flesh pink -- canthaxanthin and astaxanthin -- are found in nature, as well, and aren't harmful in farm-raised fish.

    "These are the same molecules that make wild salmon pink," said Kevin Bright, general manager of farms for Cypress Island Inc., one of the biggest farmed-salmon producers on the West Coast.

    Fish farmers, the suit notes, artificially color their products by including the two chemicals in the food that the fish eat. The practice is done, the suit says, to produce more readily marketable fish flesh, because many consumers won't buy the fish if they don't have that traditional color.

    Farmed fish, the suit says, would have gray flesh were it not for the artificial additives, because they don't get to eat other creatures like shrimp and krill containing the chemicals that give salmon their pinkish hue......


    .....The two substances are added not only to salmon to create the pinkish color but also to hen eggs to turn the yolks bright yellow. Canthaxanthin also is used in tanning pills.

    Both chemicals are from the same group of natural substances as beta-carotene. Both are antioxidants that give a reddish color to several animals, including lobsters and flamingos. In addition to enhancing salmon color, the chemicals help farm-raised salmon reproduce.

    "There are all sorts of color enhancers in the foods we eat. It just makes it more appealing to the consumer," Bright said.





    I just wanted to know your opinion on the ADDING of the color to the salmon (ps the word salmon has artifical color added to it to make it more appealing to you)
    ~Kim~

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  2. #2
    Great. More junk added to our foods.

    'This is not going to make anyone sick,' says McKay. 'This is part of the information a consumer needs to have to make an informed decision.'

    Right.

    Okay, off the soapbox. In reality, if they have been adding color it's nice they've decided to tell us about it.

    Debie
    Never take life seriously. Nobody gets out alive anyway.

  3. #3
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    I know the first time I saw it in a store (very recently) I put the salmon back down. I didnt want to buy it until I could read up on it and get some opinions here.
    ~Kim~

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  4. #4
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    I keep hearing that you shouldn't buy farm-raised salmon because of the damage salmon farms are doing to the environments where they are located. Apparently salmon are farmed in big pens in a natural body of water and the salmon farmers throw so much junk into the pens tha it alters the ecosystem around the farm. It's actually better to buy wild. Has anyone else heard that?

  5. #5
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    (Please don't pummel me with rotten fruit...) But I personally don't see what the concern is. So the fish farmers are adding a naturally occuring supplement to enhance the color of farm raised fish. It is the same component that wild fish consume in shrimp and krill. I like shrimp. I like wild salmon.

    Hmm...it would be interesting to note if the folks who are crying wolf over this supplement to farm raised fish are also the same folks who are crying wolf over commercial fishing for wild salmon.

    Anyway, I guess when I boil it all down, I feel the benefits I reep from eating salmon (the omega 3 fatty acids, etc) far outweigh my concerns about coloring supplements.

    Just my opinion.

  6. #6
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    This is my understanding, but to be honest I didn't research the supplements they feed the fish....

    The reason wild salmon are the color they are is due to the plankton and algae and such that they eat and THIS contributes to their high omega-3 content.
    Feeding farm raised salmon supplements to get their color to "the right shade" will not increase or afford them the same amount of omega-3's. If they are fed grains and color enhancers, they will be fatty, but their fat profile will be higher in the omega-6 not 3.
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

  7. #7
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    We only buy wild salmon (Alaskan is definitely the best IMO). Like wallycat said, I've also heard that farm raised salmon is not as high in omega-3s....and the "color enhancement" bothers me as well.

  8. #8
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    Thanks guys. I LOVE getting opinions from everyone. The activist in me wants to automatically be offended for someone tampering with my food, while the "cup-is-ALWAYS-half full" in me wants to automatically think the best of everyone, including salmon farmers Those 2 parts of me frequently have big debates in my head

    Id like to find fresh not-farmed salmon, but it is hard around here. Why the sudden discussion??? We are heading out to buy salmon tonight for a romantic dinner....
    ~Kim~

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  9. #9
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    I don't see what the big deal is - it's not like this is a dye being injected into the fillets, it's a supplement fed to the fish. And it's an antioxidant as well - aren't they supposed to be good for you? And since these chemicals are the same ones found in wild salmon, are they nutritively any different (omega 3's notwithstanding)?

    Personally, I'm appalled that there's a class-action lawsuit over this. No one has been harmed by this supplement, and the claim that people thought they were getting wild salmon seems very weak to me - these consumers should have asked where the salmon came from, rather than assuming it was wild because of its color. Just another example of our legal system gone awry, IMHO .

  10. #10
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    And this is why I wanted to do some research on it. The label on the fish simply says "color added". It doesnt say why, how, when or what it is. People are immediately up in arms about color added to ketchup, but arent bothered immediately when it is added to salmon. I was bothered for the same reasons as the ketchup, and continued to be until I found some research on why, how, etc.

    I guess this quote "Fish farmers, the suit notes, artificially color their products by including the two chemicals in the food that the fish eat. The practice is done, the suit says, to produce more readily marketable fish flesh, because many consumers won't buy the fish if they don't have that traditional color." is what would still irritate me. The stuff isnt being added to the fish to make it more healthy (ie omega 3's etc) but to make it more marketable. However, since it isnt a "food dye" (which I now know), I would porbably still buy it if I cant find un-farmed....so I can have my salmon fix
    ~Kim~

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  11. #11
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    Kim, I'm sorry if the first part of my post came across as a bit, well, snotty . My "no big deal" attitude came only after reading the material on the links you provided. I've not seen any signs in my local grocery store saying "color added" (and I've bought salmon twice in the last week), but if I had, I'd have been a bit concerned, too. What truly gets my goat (and where the tone of my post came from) is that people would actually sue over this. They're upset that there was no labelling, but they're still suing even after the grocery stores put signs up? I just don't think that's the purpose of civil litigation (although I'm sure that others will differ ).

  12. #12
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    Kim - where do you purchase your salmon around here? I've been to Louie's Seafood market (good, but $$$); Kroger has it on sale this week. Your opinion?

  13. #13
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    I wouldn't start a lawsuit over the salmon having "color added". That being said, I don't buy farmed salmon. Ever.

  14. #14
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    Originally posted by ClaraB
    Kim, I'm sorry if the first part of my post came across as a bit, well, snotty . My "no big deal" attitude came only after reading the material on the links you provided. I've not seen any signs in my local grocery store saying "color added" (and I've bought salmon twice in the last week), but if I had, I'd have been a bit concerned, too. What truly gets my goat (and where the tone of my post came from) is that people would actually sue over this. They're upset that there was no labelling, but they're still suing even after the grocery stores put signs up? I just don't think that's the purpose of civil litigation (although I'm sure that others will differ ).
    And Im sorry if I made you feel I thought you were snotty....I had a meltdown this afternoon and apparently I was building up to it this morning...I picked 2 fights with DH on the first time Ive seen him in 5 days.... BTW, I also am appalled at these lawsuits (actually at many of them in this country!!!!)

    I have bought Salmon at Randalls and today I bought it at Sams. Is the other place the fish market on Rayford Sawdust? DO they have fresh salmon? Id be willing to pay more for it.....
    ~Kim~

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  15. #15
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    Originally posted by Kayaksoup
    I wouldn't start a lawsuit over the salmon having "color added". That being said, I don't buy farmed salmon. Ever.
    Id wish I had this option....Im looking for it...
    ~Kim~

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  16. #16
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    Question Throwing another wrench into things...

    We love salmon and have it fairly often. I wasn't thrilled when I read the label in the grocery store about "color added". I will still buy it, but I am skeptical about things that make claims to be "safe" and are often found out later to be quite otherwise.

    BUT... something else regarding farm-raised vs. wild salmon... I, too, have read that farm-raised are not as high in omega 3's, but wild salmon has significantly higher mercury content than farm-raised. And mercury in seafood is a big issue for me.

    What are others' thoughts on this?

    Lynn
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  17. #17
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    Re: Throwing another wrench into things...

    Originally posted by Lynn B
    We love salmon and have it fairly often. I wasn't thrilled when I read the label in the grocery store about "color added". I will still buy it, but I am skeptical about things that make claims to be "safe" and are often found out later to be quite otherwise.

    BUT... something else regarding farm-raised vs. wild salmon... I, too, have read that farm-raised are not as high in omega 3's, but wild salmon has significantly higher mercury content than farm-raised. And mercury in seafood is a big issue for me.

    What are others' thoughts on this?

    Lynn
    Maybe we should all go on an all water diet....of course the water has nasty stuff in it.....
    ~Kim~

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  18. #18
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    Eating Well had an interesting article on mercury in seafood in the Spring 2003 issue (title of the article was: The Case of the Woman Who Ate Too Well, pg 11)

    One line of the article stated: "Reasearchers conclude that the cardioprotective effect of omega-3's in fish may be diminished by the fish's mercury content." And "The toxin (mercury) accumulates in fish at the top of the food chain."

    Here is the chart they had in the article:

    .73-1.45 parts per million (ppm) mercury
    Tilefish, Swordfish, Shark, King Mackerel

    .20-.72 ppm
    Red Snapper, Orange ruoughy, Marlin, Grouper, Tuna steaks, American lobster, Bluefish, Halibut, Sablefish, Pollock

    .20-.19 ppm
    Cod, Mahi Mahi, Tuna (canned), Crab (Blue, Dungeness) Haddock, Whitefish, Herring, Spiny lobster, Perch

    0-.09 ppm
    Crab (king), Catfish, Scallops, Flounder/Sole, Salmon, Oysters, Shrimp, Clams, Tilapia

  19. #19
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    Thanks for the info. Did the EW article delineate between farm-raised and wild salmon, though? Because I know I have read that there is a significant difference between the two as regards mercury content. Just as there is with tuna... the "solid-white albacore" type of canned tuna has been found to consistently be significantly higher in mercury than the regular ol' "chunk light" tuna.

    It's all enough to make me want to go back to bed, pull the covers up over my head and stay there!!!

    Lynn
    I take life with a grain of salt... a wedge of lime, and a shot of tequila.

    Visit my blog at: http://www.lifewithlynnb.blogspot.com

  20. #20
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    It's late (for me) and I'm just skimming this, but there was a recent thread...and article about mercury and fish...and that the mercury they test for toxicity is not the same as that found in fish....
    guess we wait for further details.
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

  21. #21
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    Originally posted by Lynn B
    Thanks for the info. Did the EW article delineate between farm-raised and wild salmon, though? Because I know I have read that there is a significant difference between the two as regards mercury content. Just as there is with tuna... the "solid-white albacore" type of canned tuna has been found to consistently be significantly higher in mercury than the regular ol' "chunk light" tuna.

    It's all enough to make me want to go back to bed, pull the covers up over my head and stay there!!!

    Lynn
    Ditto!!! I told DH we need to move to a commune in SIberia, grow our own food.....
    ~Kim~

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    Dave Barry

  22. #22
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    And I read somewhere that farmed salmon had higher levels of PCBs than wild. I vote for the water diet as well Distilled.

  23. #23
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    No, the EW article didn't differenciate between farm-raised and wild salmon.

    In regards to Wallycat's comment, the article did say "Mercury, a by-product of coal-burning power plants and other pollution sources, transforms into methylmercury in waterways. The toxin accumulates in fish at the top of the food chain. In humans it harms the brain and central nervous system and has been linked to behaviour and intelligence problems in children."

    In know here in the "lake states" that there are all sorts of warnings on what kind of fish you can safely consume and how much you can safely consume from some of the major rivers (St. Louis, Mississippi, St. Croix, Wisconsin River, Wolf River, just to name a few)...and this is fresh water! I can only imagine what's floating around out in the ocean.

  24. #24
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    I guess moderation seems to be the wisest choice, once again, until we know more. Earlier this week, I read an article in the paper suggetsing limiting your intake of farmed salmon because of possible high PCB levels. Yesterday, I was at my mother's and read an article in Reader's Dicest about some doctors in CA who, while not in a scientific study, found that most of their mysterious illness patients with memory loss, hair loss and some other similar symtpoms had high mercury levels in their blood, ate a lot of fish and got better within 2 weeks of curtailing the fish.

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