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Thread: Help mirin substitute?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
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    Help mirin substitute?

    Help!

    I have a recipe that needs mirin. I have looked everywhere for it but can't seem to find it. Does anyone know what I can use as a substitute?

    Thanks.

    Editor's Note: Mirin is a sweet cooking wine made from rice. Sake can be used as a substitute for mirin (with an added pinch of sugar). See one of our contributor's blog post on The Japanese Pantry for more information and our collection of Superfast Asian Recipes for inspiration.
    Last edited by AllisonCL; 07-28-2010 at 08:53 AM.

  2. #2
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    Here's what Cook's Thesaurus has to say:

    mirin = sweet rice wine = sweet sake Pronunciation: MEE-reen Notes: This is a very sweet Japanese rice wine that's used to flavor rice and sauces. It's not usually consumed as a beverage. Aji mirin is salted, so adjust the recipe accordingly. Substitutes: 1 tablespoon dry sherry + teaspoon sugar OR sherry OR heat two parts sake and one part sugar OR white wine + sugar to taste OR white wine

    Cheryl
    Deja Moo: The feeling that you've heard all the bull before.

    Cheryl

  3. #3
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    If you make Chinese/Asian foods often, I think its worth searching for. If you have an Asian grocer/market near you, the would certainly carry it.

    You could always order it from Ethnic Grocer but the shipping to Canada may be a bit cost prohibitive. The link above will take you to the Mirin I use if you want to see what it looks like (its Kikkoman).

  4. #4
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    I found it in my local grocery store, which was a surprise. You could always try Whole Foods, they seem to have just about everything!
    Dianne

  5. #5
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    You might also want to check out a liquor store.

  6. #6
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    Thanks eveyone.
    I did look in all the grocery stores in my area, but no luck. I will have to try the liquor store or just try the sherry substitute.
    I will let you know how it goes.

  7. #7
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    mirin substitute

    I'm sure it depends on the recipe, but I successfully substituted apple juice for mirin in a recipe for walnut-miso pasta sauce.

  8. #8
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    thanks maybe appple jucie will work.
    the recipe is for a miso sauce to be served with grilled vegetabels.
    it is:

    1/3rd cup mirin
    1/3rd cup miso
    1/3rd cup boiling water.

    I have never tried this recipe, it sounds so simple and I love grilled vegies.

  9. #9

    Does anybody know?

    Sorry to barge in, but would anybody know what to substitute it in Tamango batter? And the Apple juice will probably work with your recipe very well.

  10. #10
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    The bottle I have on my shelf is labeled Mirin-seasoned rice vinegar - is this the same thing as the mirin you refer to or is some kind of strange Americanized version? It is definitely not sake and has no listing of alcohol content.
    Anne

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anne View Post
    The bottle I have on my shelf is labeled Mirin-seasoned rice vinegar - is this the same thing as the mirin you refer to or is some kind of strange Americanized version? It is definitely not sake and has no listing of alcohol content.
    It is not rice vinegar. Mirin has an alcohol content of 8%, or at least my Kikkoman brand does. It is not sold in liquor stores. As Viccandi said, it's in the Asian section of the supermarket.

    Bob

  12. #12
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    Thanks Bob - I'll take a careful look at the Asian section in our markets but I suspect real mirin is something I'll have to order on line or pick up down south. I have a hard time sorting through different condiments that have the same name.
    Anne

  13. #13
    Yeah I think what Bob said is what I needed. Does it have any special name? And also if you know is there any substitute for it if I can't find it? Thanks!

  14. #14
    Although as discussed mirin and rice wine vinegar are not the same, I've used rice wine vinegar in a pinch and it worked fine.

  15. #15

    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by cloudybay View Post
    Help!

    I have a recipe that needs mirin. I have looked everywhere for it but can't seem to find it. Does anyone know what I can use as a substitute?

    Thanks.

    Another Solution is to make your own. mirin = sake:sugar at a 3:1 ratio.
    ex. 1/2 cup sake + 1/6 cup sugar (2 TBSP + 2 tsp)


    and if you want real Teriyaki sauce take the 1/2 cup example above and mix it with 1/2 cup Soy sauce (the real stuff, make sure it doesnt have hydrolyzed soy protien and does have soy beans in it) and 2 TBSP of sugar and simmer for a couple of minutes (dont let it get too thick) and as the name teriyaki implys cook whatever your using it on over a lump charcoal flame and all will be good. (teriyaki literally translates to a glossy char)

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by cloudybay View Post
    thanks maybe appple jucie will work.
    the recipe is for a miso sauce to be served with grilled vegetabels.
    it is:

    1/3rd cup mirin
    1/3rd cup miso
    1/3rd cup boiling water.

    I have never tried this recipe, it sounds so simple and I love grilled vegies.
    Sounds similar to tentsuyu which is usually served with tempura.

    1 cup dashi soup stock (used in miso soup among other things)
    1/4 cup mirin
    1/4 cup soy sauce
    1/2 TBSP sugar

    heat the mirin in a pan, add the rest of the ingredients and boil.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by sharsd View Post
    Although as discussed mirin and rice wine vinegar are not the same, I've used rice wine vinegar in a pinch and it worked fine.
    Me too. And I've actually found the rice wine vinegar tasted better in the recipe.

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