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Thread: sub for parchment paper?

  1. #1

    Question sub for parchment paper?

    I'm making cheese wafers that are to be baked on a parchment-lined cookie sheet. I don't have any parchment--can I just grease/butter/oil the sheet and have good results? Which, if any, is best?

    Shar

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
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    Do you have a Silpat??

    I'd just be concerned about clean-up.
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

  3. #3
    Originally posted by wallycat
    Do you have a Silpat??

    I'd just be concerned about clean-up.
    No. Is this going to just be a mess? Maybe I should just forget it.

    Shar

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    I don't guarantee this, but I've used aluminum foil in the place of parchment paper with decent success.

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    North of the ocean, South of the Freeway, Mississippi Gulf Coast
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    I always use foil when parchment paper isn't available. That way if anything sticks, I can just peel it off the foil, or the other way round, as needed.
    Anna
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    A fruit is a vegetable with looks and money.
    Plus, if you let fruit rot, it turns into wine,
    something Brussels sprouts never do.
    P. J. O'Rourke, humorist
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

  6. #6
    Thanks for the replies. Foil is a good idea--I'll try that next time. I just used a teflon sheet, buttered, took them off immediately and cooled on a wire rack and they did fine--no problem at all.

    Shar

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    I had another idea about why I use foil:
    When baking for the holidays, I tend to have more cookies/dough balls than cookie sheets, so it's really convenient to just lift the foil (and their cookies) off the cookie sheet, and let it cool by itself. The cookie sheet is freed up for another round of baking, and the cookies get to begin the cooling process without more than a few seconds of my attention. Do be careful when re-wrapping a hot cookie sheet with another layer of foil, though, both because you might burn yourself and because any dough balls you put down on it will be likely to melt/spread a bit, so you need to be sure to place them carefully. (Re-arranging dough that's already begun to melt/cook on a hot cookie sheet is too much hassle on a busy day.)
    Anna
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    A fruit is a vegetable with looks and money.
    Plus, if you let fruit rot, it turns into wine,
    something Brussels sprouts never do.
    P. J. O'Rourke, humorist
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

  8. #8

    Cool

    Another thought-- just in case.

    Parchment has the ability to absorb grease, whereas foil does not. So depending upon your recipe, you could end up with grease puddles on your foil. Another issue is that foil is reflective, which may cause things to burn more quickly. (Perhaps baking shiny side-down might reduce this tendency?) At any rate, though I know others have had great success subbing foil, I'd suggest if you ever opt to try it that you check your wafers frequently just to make sure nothing is going awry.

    Frankly, I'd be more inclined to do as you did, greasing your sheet, than using the foil. Or between now and next time, why not pick up a roll of parchment?

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