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Thread: Can I sub almond extract for paste??

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
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    Georgia 'burbs
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    Can I sub almond extract for paste??

    I am planning to make this recipe tomorrow and couldn't find almond paste at the store. I'm thinking of just subbing almond extract so I don't have to run to the store again tomorrow. It's only 2 tablespoons so I don't think the liquid vs. paste should make a difference but I'm not sure. Baking is not my best skill, but I know there's lots of experienced bakers on this bb so I'd love your advice. Here's the recipe, from CL 3/03:

    Raspberry-Almond Torte with Chocolate Ganache

    A torte is a cake enriched with nuts and often layered with jam. Almond paste is a mixture of ground almonds and sugar. Look for it in the baking aisle of most supermarkets.


    INGREDIENTS:
    Cake:
    Cooking spray
    6 tablespoons butter, softened
    2 tablespoons almond paste
    1 cup granulated sugar, divided
    3 large eggs
    3/4 cup all-purpose flour
    1/4 teaspoon salt
    4 large egg whites

    Filling:
    1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
    1 (10-ounce) jar seedless raspberry preserves
    1/2 cup powdered sugar, sifted
    Ganache:
    1/2 cup granulated sugar
    1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa
    1/3 cup fat-free milk
    1 (4-ounce) bar semisweet chocolate, chopped

    INSTRUCTIONS:
    1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

    2. Coat a 15 x 10-inch jelly roll pan with cooking spray; line bottom with parchment paper. Coat parchment paper with cooking spray.

    3. To prepare cake, place butter and almond paste in a large bowl; beat with a mixer at medium speed 2 minutes or until blended. Add 1/2 cup granulated sugar, beating until well blended (about 3 minutes). Add eggs, 1 at a time, beating well after each addition.

    4. Lightly spoon flour into dry measuring cups; level with a knife. Combine flour and salt, stirring with a whisk. Add flour mixture to butter mixture, beating just until combined.

    5. Place the egg whites in a large bowl. Using clean, dry beaters, beat egg whites with a mixer at high speed until foamy. Gradually add 1/2 cup granulated sugar, 1 tablespoon at a time, beating until stiff peaks form. Fold egg whites into batter; pour batter into prepared pan.

    6. Bake at 350 degrees for 18 minutes or until cake springs back when touched lightly. Cool. Invert cake onto a wire rack. Remove parchment paper. Cut cake into 4 (10 x 33/4-inch) rectangles.

    7. To prepare filling, combine juice and raspberry preserves, stirring with a whisk. Add powdered sugar, stirring until smooth. Reserve 3/4 cup raspberry mixture. Place 1 cake rectangle on a cake platter; spread with 1/4 cup raspberry mixture, leaving a 1/4-inch border. Repeat procedure with remaining cake and 1/2 cup raspberry mixture, ending with cake.

    8. To prepare ganache, combine 1/2 cup granulated sugar, cocoa, and milk in a medium saucepan over medium heat; bring mixture to a boil, stirring frequently. Cook 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat, and add chocolate, stirring until smooth. Spread ganache evenly over top and sides of cake; let stand 20 minutes or until set. Serve reserved raspberry mixture with torte.

    NUTRITIONAL INFO: CALORIES 313 (30 percent from fat); FAT 10. 3g (sat 5. 7g, mono 2. 9g, poly 0. 5g); PROTEIN 4. 7g; CARB 52. 5g; FIBER 1. 6g; CHOL 69mg; IRON 2. 1mg; SODIUM 149mg; CALC 69mg

    YIELD: 12 servings (serving size: 1 torte slice and 1 tablespoon raspberry mixture)
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
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    4,211
    In this case, it will make a difference, I think. The almond paste is part of the structure of the cake. (The "nut" part that makes it a torte.)

    It won't be a torte, but you can substitute ground-up oats for the almonds, with some almond extract for the flavour. (A trick I have used many times in my "lowest possible fat" quests.) If you have any kind of nuts, you can grind those, and sub them. (If you do this in the food processor, add some of the sugar with the nuts and process only in BURSTS, watching carefully to ensure that you do not end up with nut butter.)

    Almond paste, as you probably know, is also very close to marzipan (the difference is only in ratio of sugar to almonds) so if you can find marzipan you could use that.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    12,171
    I personally wouldn't make that substitution. The almond paste will contribute to the texture whereas the extract would not. Also, there is a taste difference between the two.

    Look for the almond paste in the baking aisle. If you can't find it, use marzipan. It isn't the exact same thing, but it would be a better sub than almond extract.

    oops...
    I was typing at the same time as CR.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Georgia 'burbs
    Posts
    672
    Thanks very much for the quick response, I'm glad that I asked before ruining this torte!! I will go back to my regular store tomorrow where I know they at least have the marzipan and I think I've seen the almond paste.
    Wag more...bark less...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    northern california
    Posts
    751
    Marzipan is not the same thing, you shouldn't sub with that. The almond paste is usually on the top shelf of the baking isle. Odense is probably the most common. It will sit right next to the marzipan.
    Karen

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Hockeytown!
    Posts
    9,564
    Originally posted by Kjente2
    Marzipan is not the same thing, you shouldn't sub with that. The almond paste is usually on the top shelf of the baking isle. Odense is probably the most common. It will sit right next to the marzipan.
    Marzipan isn't the same, it's true, but in a pinch, it does work as a substitute.
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