Community Message Boards
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 54

Thread: Another cookie question - how to get good looking spritz cookies?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Danvers, MA
    Posts
    6,924

    Another cookie question - how to get good looking spritz cookies?

    Last year I searched everywhere for spritz cookie recipes and found thousands. I have a Pampered Chef spritz cookie maker which is supposed to work really well, but not for me - at least not yet.

    I can't get the cookies to come out of the spritz thing and 1) adhere to the cookie sheet and 2) not make peaks when I lift away the spritz thing.

    I've tried chilling the dough, not chilling the dough, Martha's recipe, the PC recipe that came with the spritz thing, etc. Nothing has worked. Anyone got any great tips?

    Loren
    The term "working mother" is redundant.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    2,191
    My mom and I make the recipe out of the red and white checked BH&G cookbook every year without issues. I have no idea what our secret is. The dough is usually chilled but not super cold. Perhaps lining your cooking sheets with parchment would help. I wonder if your non-stick cookie sheets are a little too non sticky?
    ~ I used to be undecided, but now I'm not so sure ~ Boscoe Pertwee

  3. #3
    Rosie - would you mind posting that cookie dough recipe? I also have the PC cookie press and have never had any success with the recipes I've used. Thanks!

    Debbie

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Louisiana
    Posts
    4,736
    My question is how do you make good TASTING spritz cookies? I've never made any that tasted worth a darn!:mad:
    Margaret

  5. #5

    Cool

    Grr.

    Just typed up a nice long post for you and the computer ate it. (Good recipe, you see.)

    I have been making spritz cookies successfully since The Beginning of Time. Offhand, it sounds like your batter is too soft. Since you indicated you've tried fridging it without success, I'm curious if you're using butter or margarine. And are you sifting where you're not required to do so?

    I am using an old cookie press which I've had longer than many of you have been alive. Technological advances have certainly come into play here, so perhaps much of what I'm saying doesn't apply anymore. My press has the usual assortment of disks, each of which has one side which is slightly rough around the cutouts, whereas the other side is smooth. Putting the disks in upside down will prevent your dough from cutting off. Since I never remember which way the thing goes in (logic tells me rough side up, but that could be completely wrong) I've often had to take the thing off, wash it, turn it around and try again. Another problem can be that some disks simply don't work with certain doughs. You get mutant cookies which you feel compelled to scoop up and throw back into the press to try again. My son invariably complains that I don't USE certain shapes. There's a reason for that. They just don't seem to work. There is also a rhythm to using a cookie press-- or anyway there's a rhythm to using my old one. Invariably when I'm starting out, I have to assume a strange stance so I can peek under the press as I'm working, to make sure when it's let out enough dough and it's time to back off. the first few each year are trial and error, catching the rhythm and feel, then after a few, I've gotten the rhythm again and the rest is easy.

    Other than one miserable year in which I'd "lost" my recipe, I've been using this one for twenty years. It's reliable and everyone seems to like the way they taste.

    WHITE HOUSE SPRITZ COOKIES

    1 can (8 ounces) almond paste **
    1/4 cup egg whites, unbeaten
    6 tablespoons sugar
    3/4 cup (1 1/2 sticks butter, softened)
    1/4 teaspoon salt
    1/2 teaspoon vanilla
    1 3/4 cups unsifted all-purpose flour***

    1. Break up almond paste with fingers in large bowl (just break up the almond paste. Broken fingers hurt.) Add half egg whites (Do half egg whites come from half eggs? Never mind.) Beat with electric mixer at low speed until mixture is smooth.
    2. Beat in sugar and butter until light and fluffy. (No, this does NOT mean you beat sugar and butter till you burst into song.) Add remaining egg whites, salt and vanilla and mix well. Stir in flour, 1/3 at a time, blending well.
    3. Fit a pastry bag with a star tip, fill pastry bag with dough. (Really this works just fine in a cookie press.) Press dough out on lightly greased cookie sheets; top each with red or green chery half. (This is SO 'eighties. Leave off the stupid cherries. Decorate the cookies after they're baked.)
    4. Bake at 375 for 10 minutes or until set and edges begin to turn golden. (In my oven 7-8 minutes is fine.) Remove to wire rack. Cool completely.

    (From: Family Circle Magazine, circa 1980's, article with cookie recipes from the White House)

    Notes: We usually decorate these like sugar cookies with colored frostings and such ('cause I have a kid and he LIKES doing that) You could also dip or squiggle them with melted chocolate and add a sprinkling of nuts.)

    ** About that almond paste. Even in the 1980's I found no sign of canned almond paste. The only thing around was in a tube. A 7 ounce tube. So. To supplement the recipe a bit, grind up (VERY finely, or they'll get stuck in the corners of the press cut-outs or do other weird things) an ounce of almonds-- blanched or otherwise, doesn't matter. Add this when you add the almond paste. Presto!

    *** I KNOW the accepted way to measure flour is to dole it out with a spoon and then level. And I do that with MOST recipes. This one, I'm realizing, I've always done by scooping the measuring cup into the flour and leveling it off, which is going to compact the flour a bit more and actually use more than quoted in the recipe. Since this is the way I've done them for years-- and you are having issues with your dough being too soft-- I'm going to make the recommendation that you do likewise. Otherwise, I can't vouch for reliability of the recipe.

    Good luck!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    IL
    Posts
    12,505
    I've had success with Spritz cookies in the past, but DH hates those cookies. He loves all cookies but Spritz. Jazzmatazz49 - you asked how to make one that tastes good - maybe DH doesn't think they taste good either.

    I'm not sure what the secret is either, but I do know I didn't use parchment or a non-stick sheet for them. You need the sheet to cling to the dough. I think I have used the recipe that came with my spritzer. I'll track it down for you and post later if you'd like.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Fresno, Ca
    Posts
    2,749
    Originally posted by Gail
    I have been making spritz cookies successfully since The Beginning of Time. Offhand, it sounds like your batter is too soft. Since you indicated you've tried fridging it without success, I'm curious if you're using butter or margarine. And are you sifting where you're not required to do so?

    I am using an old cookie press which I've had longer than many of you have been alive. Technological advances have certainly come into play here, so perhaps much of what I'm saying doesn't apply anymore. My press has the usual assortment of disks, each of which has one side which is slightly rough around the cutouts, whereas the other side is smooth. Putting the disks in upside down will prevent your dough from cutting off. Since I never remember which way the thing goes in (logic tells me rough side up, but that could be completely wrong) I've often had to take the thing off, wash it, turn it around and try again. Another problem can be that some disks simply don't work with certain doughs. You get mutant cookies which you feel compelled to scoop up and throw back into the press to try again. My son invariably complains that I don't USE certain shapes. There's a reason for that. They just don't seem to work. There is also a rhythm to using a cookie press-- or anyway there's a rhythm to using my old one. Invariably when I'm starting out, I have to assume a strange stance so I can peek under the press as I'm working, to make sure when it's let out enough dough and it's time to back off. the first few each year are trial and error, catching the rhythm and feel, then after a few, I've gotten the rhythm again and the rest is easy.
    Oh, Gail I'm ROTFL right now because I know EXACTLY what you mean (I too have done the strange "peek under the press dance" quite a few times.) And isn't it always just when you get the ryhthm going, you're out of dough. Although I won't say I've been doing it as long as Gail has, I have quite a few years under my belt when it comes to this particular activity.

    Gracie, my question is: is your press plastic or metal. In my experience the plastic ones do not work that well. (One year as a Christmas gift my mother tracked down a metal one because the plastic one she had gotten me wasn't worth anything. Of course, she still HAS her metal one and uses it, so we needed to get another one.)

    This is one of those things that I have found where the old models are significantly better than the new ones. (Or maybe it's my technique. )
    The best sound is that of someone laughing in their sleep.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    1,925
    Loren,
    Hmmmm....I wish I could be more help. I have the PC cookie press and I was amazed that the two times DD and I made them (last year and this year), that it worked perfectly. I am a true recipe follower, so I swear I read every word on the two sides of the little multi-folded card that came with it and followed it exactly ("tips for success", "how to use" and the actual recipe). I used two PC baking stones and 1 non-stick cookie sheet. Didn't grease them.....didn't refrigerate the dough.....made sure that I put the disks in with the number facing in whatever direction it told me to.....did the "two trigger pull", cut that dough off, two trigger pulls for the first cookie (touching the press to the stone, then lifting off----first cookie came out fatter and uglier than the others---and then one trigger pull for each additional cookie, which came out perfect. I really can't think of one thing that I did differently than what the recipe said....used real butter (I did use unsalted, although I can't imagine that would make a difference), softened it first (very soft actually, maybe that did something? My new range hood has little pull down trays with warming lights....I realized my butter was cold and put it under the lights for a bit....the outside edges got melty and everything else very soft)....used the KA mixer.....just trying to recall all of the details to see if there's anything that would indicate why it would work for me and not for you..... Katie

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Lone Star State
    Posts
    20,732
    My thought was the same as Gail's -- probably too soft -- add a little four. As for flavor -- spritz needs to be made with good quality unslated butter -- but haven't tried the almond paste version Gail posted, YET. That butter or almond paste is the source of most of the flavor. If that's no good, you're going to be choking on flour. I think I have seen a cream cheese version too -- the key is a fat source with good, rich flavor.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    383
    I've been making Spritz cookies for years. Gail's description was perfect! Some come out better than others, certain shapes work better. I did find an 8 oz can of Almond paste at the store today so I picked it up. I'm going to try Gail's recipe. When I make them, I usually split the dough in half, make one half green and use peppermint extract and the other half red (pink) and use almond. Do you think I could substitute the vanilla in this recipe for peppermint?
    Runs for food

  11. #11
    Originally posted by cinbis
    ... Do you think I could substitute the vanilla in this recipe for peppermint?
    No.

    These have a pretty strong almond flavor.

  12. #12

    Cool

    Originally posted by Beth
    ... I think I have seen a cream cheese version too -- the key is a fat source with good, rich flavor.
    The Fine Cooking Holiday Baking magazine has a cream cheese version.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    383
    Gail, thank you. I'll just use the vanilla.
    Runs for food

  14. #14
    I have found that they work best on COLD, unlined baking sheets. I had disaster the time I tried parchment and I am nomally a BIG believer in parchment! I also agree with those who say some shapes work better than others. I have tried a variety of cookie presses and not had great luck until I bought the Wilton Professional? I am not sure that is the name but it is metal, comes with a smaller than the normal amount of disks, retails for somewhere between 19.99 and 24.99 although you can get it on sale for much less. It is WONDERFUL! It has this lever thingy that only releases the right amount of dough..or something like that!

    I use a great recipe from a friend....but I never seem to keep track of it and have to call her yearly to get it! I will be doing that this weekend...if anyone would like to see it, I will be happy to post it.
    Sheila in MD

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    781
    I just finished making the spritz cookies with the cream cheese, from the Fine Cooking Holiday Baking. My results where that the dough worked well in the cookie press, (old one) and the cookies taste OK, I guess. Dh liked them. My problem is that I'm looking for a spritz cookie recipe from the early 60's that my mother made. I know hers had cream cheese and we all loved them. But this just didn't measure up. Something missing. Anyone have another recipe with cream cheese?

    Gail, since I love almond flavor, I will try yours, sounds great. Sheila in MD. I'd like to see yours also.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Danvers, MA
    Posts
    6,924
    Thank you all for all this wonderful information! The PC cookie press discs are plastic, but Katie, it sounds like you did everything I did too! Maybe there's still hope for success.

    Gail, thank you so much for all that information. I'm going to try your recipe. I wonder if the disc I tried just didn't work like some shapes you mentioned. I wanted Christmas trees last year and I just got blobs.

    Can someone post the Fine Cooking recipe with the cream cheese or point me to a link? Also, Sheila, I'd love your recipe too.

    We have about 18 inches of snow right now and about 24 more hours to go with this storm. I have time to experiment!!

    Loren
    The term "working mother" is redundant.

  17. #17

    Cool

    JENNIFER WEGLOWSKI'S CREAM CHEESE SPRITZ COOKIES

    Yields about 100 cookies, dpending on siz and style.

    Courtesy of Jennifer's grandmother, the recipe for this sweet and slightly tangy cookie dates back to the 1960's. Luckily, today's cookie presses are much easier to use than the old hand-crank variety, so baking dozens of pretty little cookies is a snap.

    8 ounces (1 cup) unsalted butter, softened at room temperature
    3 ounces cream cheese (Jennifer uses Philadelphia brand), softened at room temperature
    1 cup granulated sugar
    1 large egg yolk
    1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
    11 1/4 ounces (2 1/2 cups) all purpose flour, sifted
    1 egg white, lightly beaten
    Colored sugars or other decorations for sprinkling (optional)

    Heat the oven to 375 F. With a stand mixer (use the paddle attachment) or a hand mixer, beat the butter, cream cheese, and sugar in a large bowl on medium speed until ight and fluffy, about 4 minutes. Add the egg yolk and vanilla and beat again until blended. Add the flour and mix on low speed until blended.

    Fit a cookie press with a die plate. Scoop up about a quarter of the dough and, using a small amount of lour if needed, shape the dough into a log just narrower than the barrel of the cookie press. Slide the log into the cookie press and spritz the cookies directly onto ungreased baking sheets about 1 inch apart. Brush the tops with the beaten egg white and sprinkle with colored sugar if using. Repeat with the remaining dough.

    Bake until the cookies are just golden around the edges, 10 to 12 minutes (it's best to bake one sheet at a time). Let the cookies cool on the baking sheet on a rack for 5 minutes before transferring them to a rack to cool completely. Be sure the baking sheet is cool before spritzing more cookies.

    Store at room temperature or freeze in an airtight container, separating the cookie layers with waxed paper.

    (From: Fine Cooking Holiday Baking)

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Danvers, MA
    Posts
    6,924
    Originally posted by Gail


    Luckily, today's cookie presses are much easier to use than the old hand-crank variety, so baking dozens of pretty little cookies is a snap.
    Yeah right!!!! Dozens of blobs is more like it!!!

    Thanks for this recipe, Gail!

    Loren
    The term "working mother" is redundant.

  19. #19

    Cool

    Tsk. I very nearly added a wisecrack after typing that line, too.

  20. #20

    Cool

    Just had a TERRIBLE thought.

    What if those of you trying the recipe I've posted, using the proper amount of almond past without the nut supplement I've always done (and my funky flour measuring) come out with DISMAL FAILURES doing it the right way!

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    412
    I bought a cookie press (I was so excited and had visions of beautifully shaped cookies by the dozen!), and my first attempts that year were fairly disasterous. The cookies didn't taste bad, but I had a heck of a time getting them out onto the cookie sheet, and then after they baked a lot of them broke .

    I can't remember last year's attempt, which leads me to believe it was such a raging success it drove me to drink away the experience.

    This year, was actually very successful. I used a recipe called Lebkuchen Spice Spritz cookies- its a rich, buttery, holiday spice cookie which has all the flavors I think epitomize Christmas. I used unsalted butter (I actually used that new Land o Lakes soft baking butter). I chilled the dough for serveral hours. I did screw up a few as I was triggering the dough, and I noticed that when I put that dough back through the cookie press, those seemed to be the most successful. I'm not sure exactly what that means though. Maybe if you work the dough just slightly to before putting it in the press???

    It is totally true that not all the shapes work. This year I didn't even try a whole bunch. I just used the one that looks like a Christmas tree. Once they were warm I drizzled a light glaze over them and sprinkled green and red sugar over them. They look pretty darn festive if I do say so myself.

    Good luck!
    -Kim

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    781
    KBS
    Please, please could you give us the recipe?

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    412
    Lauren-
    Here it is

    Lebkuchen Spice Spritz
    2/3 cup sugar
    1 cup butter -- softened
    1 egg
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon cinnamon
    1 teaspoon nutmeg
    1/2 teaspoon allspice
    1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
    2 teaspoons vanilla
    2 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
    For Glaze
    1 cup powdered sugar
    2 tablespoons milk
    1/2 teaspoon vanilla



    Heat oven to 400F. In large mixer bowl combine sugar, butter, egg, salt, spices, and vanilla. Beat at medium speed, scraping bowl often, until mixture is light and fluffy, 2 to 3 minutes. Add flour. Beat at low speed, scraping bowl often, until well mixed, 2 to 3 minutes. If dough is too soft, cover and refrigerate until firm enough to form cookies, 30 to 45 minutes. Place dough in cookie press. Form desired shapes 1 inch apart on cookie sheets. Bake for 6 to 8 minutes or until edges are lightly browned. For Glaze, in small bowl stir together powdered sugar, milk, and vanilla until smooth. Drizzle or pipe over warm cookies.

    ***My notes- I chill the dough for about 2 hours. Also, after drizzling the glaze, I sprinkle with colored sugar.

    Enjoy!
    Kim

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    781
    Thanks Kim,
    I'll give these a try in a couple of days!

    BY the way, off the subject, but I have a soft spot for Quincy Ma.
    I did a geneology on my Moms family. My great,great grandfather owned a stonecutting business and raised a family there between 1885 and 1930's or so. I don't think there are any direct descendants left now though. I enjoyed my research time there.

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    383
    Gail, I made the Spritz recipe you posted using a can of paste and your flour technique. They came out fine. I thought the almond flavor wasn't as pronounced as my old recipe so I did add a little extract to the batter I had left. The difference seems slight to me. I made them for my son to bring to scouts tonight. I'm going to make them again tomorrow for a cookie contest. I'll let you know if I win!!! I'm also going to make mint pinwheels (I'm not sure if that's the exact name) I saw on the Dec 2003 Cookie Thread for the contest.
    Runs for food

  26. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Blue Ridge Mts of VA!
    Posts
    8,782
    I have a PC cookie press, too, and I really like it. I used the spritz cookie recipe from The Joy of Cooking. It worked the first time and has never failed me. They taste good, but the fun is in making them and decorating them!

  27. #27
    I used my PC cookie press for the first time this weekend and I was amazed that I had good success! I made 4 different kinds -- all variations of the one that kbs posted above. I can post the others.

    The first few came out a little smooshed, but that was due to some air pockets that were in the tube. Cookie sheets have to be cold and I did not use any parchment paper. The recipe said to chill the dough and the PC directions said not too. One batch I chilled and another I didn't. I had to let the one I chilled get to room temperature before I could use it. The one I didn't chill came out better. If you "make a mistake" be sure to wipe the spot where the other cookie was. I found that if I didn't, the new cookie stuck.
    Maria

  28. #28
    Mint Kiss Spritz

    2/3 cup sugar
    1 cup butter -- softened
    1 egg
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    2 teaspoons vanilla
    1/4 teaspoon mint extract
    2 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
    green food coloring
    60 Hershey's Kisses


    Heat oven to 400F. In large mixer bowl combine sugar, butter, egg, salt, vanilla, and mint extract. Beat at medium speed, scraping bowl often, until mixture is light and fluffy, 2 to 3 minutes. Add flour. Beat at low speed, scraping bowl often, until well mixed, 2 to 3 minutes. Mix in green food coloring, adding just enough to acheive the desired color. If dough is too soft, cover and refrigerate until firm enough to form cookies, 30 to 45 minutes. Place dough in cookie press. Form desired shapes 1 inch apart on cookie sheets. Bake for 6 to 8 minutes or until edges are lightly browned. Immediately after removing cookies from oven place one Hershey's kiss on each cookie.
    Maria

  29. #29
    Eggnog Spritz

    2/3 cup sugar
    1 cup butter -- softened
    1 egg
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon ground nutmeg
    2 teaspoons vanilla
    2 1/4 cups all-purpose flour

    For Glaze
    1 cup powdered sugar
    1/4 cup butter -- softened
    2 tablespoons water
    1/4 teaspoon rum extract

    Heat oven to 400F. In large mixer bowl combine sugar, butter, egg, salt, spices, and vanilla. Beat at medium speed, scraping bowl often, until mixture is light and fluffy, 2 to 3 minutes. Add flour. Beat at low speed, scraping bowl often, until well mixed, 2 to 3 minutes. If dough is too soft, cover and refrigerate until firm enough to form cookies, 30 to 45 minutes. Place dough in cookie press. Form desired shapes 1 inch apart on cookie sheets. Bake for 6 to 8 minutes or until edges are lightly browned. For Glaze, in small bowl stir together powdered sugar, butter, water, and rum extract until smooth. Drizzle or pipe over warm cookies.
    Maria

  30. #30
    This one is a little different from the others; not so much a variation of.

    Snowflakes

    Makes about 66

    1 cup butter
    1 3-ounce package cream cheese
    1 cup sugar
    1 egg yolk
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    1 teaspoon grated orange zest
    2 1/2 cups sifted all-purpose flour
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1/4 teaspoon cinnamon

    Preheat oven to 350 F. Cream together butter, cream cheese and sugar. Beat in egg yolk, vanilla and orange zest. Sift together flour, salt, and cinnamon. Gradually blend flour mixture into butter mixture. Fill cookie press. Form cookies on ungreased cookie sheets. Sprinkle with colored sugar, if desired. Bake 12 to 15 minutes. Remove at once to cooling racks
    Maria

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •