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Thread: Boneless New York strip roast?

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Boneless New York strip roast?

    Has anyone ever roasted a boneless NY strip roast? I am debating over this cut and prime rib for Christmas dinner. The reason for this debate is the difference in price. As all of us beef eaters know the price of beef has skyrocketed. If you have roasted this cut, please tell me what temp., time, flavor, tenderness. Thanks for your input.

    Vicky

  2. #2
    Well I'll be the first to admit I've never heard of NY Strip ROAST. NY Strip STEAK, yes, but not roast. That certainly doesn't mean it doesn't exist!

    And, by the way, the NY Strip Steak is pretty tasty, but not as tender as a rib eye or porterhouse.

    What we need to find out, is what cut of roast the strip steak comes from. I'll see if I can find a chart.

    d

    Editing to add the following, which doesn't add much except that the NY Strip is the same cut as the KC Strip, which is in fact the Porterhouse without the tenderloin:

    When the tenderloin strip has been removed from the short loin, the remaining meat is then cut into individual steaks of the thickness desired. The correct name for such steaks is shell. However, restaurants are apt to call them by various other names: New York strip, Kansas City strip, or just plain strip steak.
    A shell steak is easily identified in your meat market. It looks exactly like a porterhouse or T-bone without the tenderloin.
    "No one can make you feel inferior without your consent." Eleanor Roosevelt

  3. #3
    Originally posted by Deanna

    Editing to add the following, which doesn't add much except that the NY Strip is the same cut as the KC Strip, which is in fact the Porterhouse without the tenderloin:

    When the tenderloin strip has been removed from the short loin, the remaining meat is then cut into individual steaks of the thickness desired. The correct name for such steaks is shell. However, restaurants are apt to call them by various other names: New York strip, Kansas City strip, or just plain strip steak.
    A shell steak is easily identified in your meat market. It looks exactly like a porterhouse or T-bone without the tenderloin.
    THANK YOU! I got into an "argument" about this with my niece and BIL a few weeks ago when we were playing Outburst. I said a KC strip and NY strip were the same thing and they wouldn't believe me. I wasn't 100% sure though. I've been meaning to ask you guys about this but never got around to it. Thanks for proving me right.

  4. #4
    So, Linda, have YOU ever heard of a strip roast? (KC, NY or otherwise?)

    I'm thinking it's the same meat that is used for the strip steak, only not cut into steaks. (Duh?)

    But what would it be called other than a strip roast?

    HA! Can you tell I love a challenge. The following is from Cook's Thesaurus:

    top loin = strip loin Equivalents: One whole top loin = two half top loins = 10 - 15 pounds. Notes: These are usually cut into top loin steaks, but a whole or half top loin is also a good candidate for roast beef. Substitutes: tenderloin roast OR rib-eye roast OR rib roast OR top sirloin butt roast OR tri-tip roast

    top loin steak = strip steak = New York steak = New York sirloin steak = Kansas City steak = contrefilet = strip loin steak = New York strip steak = Kansas City strip steak = hotel steak = hotel cut strip steak = ambassador steak = club sirloin steak = strip sirloin steak Notes: Think of these as Porterhouse or T-bone steaks that have been stripped of the choice tenderloin portion. They're flavorful and fairly expensive cuts. A boneless top loin steak is called a shell steak, and a very thick shell steak is sometimes called a shell roast. Substitutes: club steak OR sirloin steak OR T-bone steak OR Porterhouse steak
    "No one can make you feel inferior without your consent." Eleanor Roosevelt

  5. #5
    No, I don't think I've ever heard of it either. Every once in a while our grocery store will sell it whole for a good price, but I just figured everyone had the butcher cut it into steaks. Don't think I've ever heard of cooking it whole like a "roast".

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Re: Boneless New York strip roast?

    Originally posted by vbak
    Has anyone ever roasted a boneless NY strip roast? I am debating over this cut and prime rib for Christmas dinner. The reason for this debate is the difference in price. As all of us beef eaters know the price of beef has skyrocketed. If you have roasted this cut, please tell me what temp., time, flavor, tenderness. Thanks for your input.

    Vicky
    The Texas Beef Council is the source I use for information about various cuts and methods of cooking. The link will take you to the roasting method chart and your NY strip roast will be referred to as a Top Loin Roast. And here's a recipe using that cut:

    Goblin Good Supper
    Tastes so good, everyone will gobble this up.

    Prep: 20 minutes
    Cook: 45 - 50 minutes
    Servings: Serves 4
    1 beef tri-tip roast (approximately 2 lbs.)
    1 tsp. dried rosemary leaves, crushed
    2 cloves garlic, minced
    1/2 tsp. salt
    1/4 tsp. pepper
    1 Tbsp. olive oil
    2 medium sweet onions, cut into 1-inch thick wedges
    2 large sweet potatoes, peeled and quartered





    Combine rosemary, garlic, salt and pepper to form a paste. Spread half of the herb paste evenly over surface of beef tri-tip roast.
    Add oil to remaining herb paste and mix well.
    Place vegetables in a large bowl. Pour herb-oil mixture over vegetables and sitr to coat evenly.
    Place roast, fat side up, in an open roasting pan. Arrange coated vegetables around roast. Do not add water or cover. Roast in preheated 425F oven for 35-40 minutes for rare to medium.
    Remove roast when meat thermometer registers 135F for rare or 155F for medium. Allow roast to stand, tented with aluminum foil, for 10 minutes. Roast will continue to rise in temperature to reach 140F for rare and 160F for medium.
    While rost is standing, increase oven temperature to 475F. Continue cooking vegetables 10 minutes or until tender and lightly browned.
    Carve roast across the grain into thin slices. Serve with vegetables.
    Well-behaved women seldom make history!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
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    Thanks, eveerone for the replies. I found one recipe on Epicurious and it had good reviews. Many used the NY roast while others used various cuts including beef tenderloin. No comparison there. I think I have seen it at Costco. I am planning to go there at some point, so I will check it out. The roast that I saw advertised was 3.99lb., however I don't want our meal to be ruined just because I was watching the checkbook.

    Vicky

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