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Thread: Help! Need menu ideas for Scandianvian Christmas Eve Dinner!

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Question Help! Need menu ideas for Scandianvian Christmas Eve Dinner!

    Help! My parents and grandmother are coming over for Christmas this year and, foolishly, I promised to not only make Christmas dinner, but also to make a Scandinavian Christmas Eve dinner. While my family is Scandianvian, I've only had one of these dinners in my entire life. And, my Grandmother said the best present I can give her is some "good Scandinavian cooking like her mother made." However, she has no recipes to offer. Yikes!

    From what I can remember, the menu consisted of Lefse with Lingonberry Jam and Rumagrot (I'm not sure how to spell it, but it is something made with cream), Gravlax, Swedish Meatballs, Cucumber and Dill Salad and rye bread. I think there was some other stuff, but this is all I can remember. The Gravlax is easy - I can buy that. I have a recipe for Swedish meatballs and I'm pretty sure I can wing the Cucumber and Dill Salad. I even have a recipe for Lefse and I'm sure I can buy some Lingonberry Jam somewhere. However, I have no idea of how to make "Rumagrot" - this cream concoction. I'm not even sure of how to spell or how to even pronounce it. All I remember was that you boil the cream combined with sugar and/or flour until the butterfat rises to the top. Then, this really thick cream stuff is spread on the lefse. It sounds gross but it was really delicous.

    Does this sound familiar to anyone? Does anyone actually know how to make this stuff or even how to spell it? Is there anything else I should include in a Scandinvian holiday meal? I would appreciate any suggestions!

    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Dec 2002
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    I can't help, but I second the request for recipes. We're doing Scandinavian for my January supper club.

  3. #3
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    Hi there,

    I lived in Sweden and have a cookbook that my Swedish Mom wrote up for me with all of her favourite dishes. I also received as a gift a book on Christmas in Sweden and I am pretty sure there are some traditional recipes in there. I'll have a look and see what I can find for you.

    I do recognize many of the things you mention. I also remember other things that you haven't mentioned that we had for Christmas Eve. I'll post again tomorrow with anything I find that might be helpful in your planning. Anyway, I'm so excited for you! I would love to do a Scandinavian dinner.

    By the way, if you have an Ikea near you, the last time I was in their little grocery section they sold lingonberry jam, etc.

  4. #4
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    Try googling rommegrot recipe. There are several versions there. This is the one from the Sons of Norway site.

    Rommegrot (Sour Cream Pudding)
    Serves 6

    4 dl (1 2/3 cups) 35 percent fat sour cream
    about 3 dl (1 1/4 cups) flour
    about 1 1/4 liters (5 cups) full fat milk
    3/4 teaspoon salt
     
    Sour cream porridge must be made from high fat (35%) natural sour cream, with no stabilizers or gelatin added. For the best results, use homemade sour cream. Heat 2 1/2 dl (1 cup) whipping cream to 35 C (95 F), almost body temperature, then whisk in 2 tablespoons buttermilk. Let stand at room temperature at least 8 hours, until thickened. Simmer sour cream, covered, about 15 minutes. Sift over 1/3 of the flour. Simmer until the butterfat begins to leach out. Skim off the fat. Sift over the remaining flour and bring to a boil. Bring the milk to a boil and thin the porridge to desired consistency. Whisk until smooth. Simmer about 10 minutes, and season with salt. Serve with the fat, sugar and cinnamon.

  5. #5
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    I like this website here

    I watch the show when I can remember. It's all about Scandinavian cooking.....
    Understand, when you eat meat, that something did die. You have an obligation to value it - not just the sirloin but also all those wonderful tough little bits.
    Anthony Bourdain

  6. #6
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    My Grandma makes a Swedish Christmas Eve dinner every year. I don't have recipes, but here is some of the menu to give you some ideas: meatballs, cooking sausage, herring, meat and cheese tray (with Bond-ost cheese--soooo good!), rice with milk, boiled potatoes, ginger thin cookies, brown beans, limpa bread.....and that's all I can remember right now.

    It's all so good! You might be able to find lingonberries at your grocery store--usually in the jam/jelly aisle, otherwise IKEA has them. Depending on where you live, you should be able to find most of the ingredients at the grocery store.

    Kayaksoup, I love Andreas Viestad! Another source is Marcus Samuelsson, chef at Aquavit. Here are some recipes. Both chefs have cookbooks, too.

    Here is a recipe I found that I want to try!

    Lingonberry Tarts
    24 small or 12 large Clearbrook Farms Tart Shells
    1 (22 ounce) jar Clearbrook Farms Vanilla Filling
    1 (14 oz.) jar Scandinavian Delights Lingonberry Preserves

    Directions
    Arrange tart shells on prep space. Fill tart shells half-full with vanilla filling. Gently spoon preserves over filling. Serve immediately, or refrigerate, covered.

    Optional Garnish:
    whipped cream
    Nikki's Cookies Reindeer Gingerbread

    If desired, top with whipped cream and add a Reindeer cookie to complete the dessert.

    Makes 24 small or 12 large desserts.
    Blogging Fun
    Don't eat anything your great-grandmother wouldn't recognize as food. -Michael Pollan

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Originally posted by granolagirl
    I love Andreas Viestad!
    Me too. And, being of scandinavian descent, I love learning all about "my" cooking heritage
    Understand, when you eat meat, that something did die. You have an obligation to value it - not just the sirloin but also all those wonderful tough little bits.
    Anthony Bourdain

  8. #8
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    I'm pretty sure I've seen lingonberry jam at Whole Foods, Trader Joes or Cost Plus.
    *Susan*

    "One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries."

    A.A. Milne

  9. #9
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    One other thing that many Norwegians have for Christmas Eve dinner is lutefisk, which is basically salt cod soaked in a lye solution till it's the consistency of Jell-o . I've never tried it myself, but it's very popular in these parts at Christmastime (something of an acquired taste, apparently). You might also consider serving julekage, which is a Scandinavian Christmas bread. It's also considered very traditional to serve seven kinds of cookies at Christmastime in Scandinavia. I have a number of recipes for Scandinavian cookies, as well as julekage, if you're interested.

  10. #10
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    Well, it looks like you have lots of ideas to work with. I had a look in my Swedish recipe books and found the following recipes...

    Lingonsylt (Lingon Berry Jam)
    Ugnsbakad Julskinka (Oven-baked Christmas Ham)
    Julknäck (Christmas Almond Brittle)
    Julglögg (Christmas Mulled Wine)
    Mammas Köttbullar (Mom's Meatballs)
    Julpepparkakor (Christmas Gingerbread Cookies)
    Saffransbröd (Saffron Bread)
    Julrisgryngröt (Swedish Christmas Porrige)

    Let me know if you are interested in any of these recipes. They are the tried and true recipes of my Swedish family.

    As for my memories of Christmas (on Christmas Eve) dinner...they include herring, liver pate, meatballs, ham (a definite must), Jansson's temptation, lutfisk, and rice porrige (they put one almond in the porrige and the person who gets it in their bowl is supposed to get married in the next year and before eating any porrige you go around the table and everyone has to make up or recite a poem).

    Have fun!

  11. #11
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    It may not be that traditional but I seem to remember that BA did a Swedish buffet a couple of years back.. The recipes may be on the epicurious web site.

  12. #12
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    Oak Harbor, WA
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    Wow. Thanks for all the great ideas. I'll definitely make the Rommegrot based on the recipe below. I think we'll be skipping the Lutefisk tho. That is just too wacky (and, my grandmother is allergic to iodine, so she can't have any sort of seafood or fish. Whew!)

    Oceanjasper: I reviewed the December CL last night and had already decided to make the version of saffron bread in the Cooking Class section. I'm intrigued by a couple of the recipes you listed, however. The Swedish Christmas Porridge and Jansson's Temptation. I'd love it if you could post the recipes.

    Thanks again everyone for the ideas!

  13. #13
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    Here is the recipe for the Christmas porrige. It is quite plain, but I think that this is a tradition from when people didn't really have much else to eat.

    JULRISGRYNSGRÖT

    Coversion note: 1 dl = 2/3 cup

    3 dl short-grained rice
    5 dl water
    1 tsp salt
    1 litre (10 dl) milk
    sugar
    cinammon
    almond

    In a saucepan, mix together the water, rice and salt and bring to a boil. At the same time, let the milk get warm in another pot. Boil the porrige uncovered on low heat for 5-10 minutes until the water is almost gone. Stir carefully now and then. When the water is almost gone, add the warm milk. Put the saucepan on medium heat and bring to a boil once again. Then let the porrige simmer uncovered on low heat for around 25-30 minutes. Check the consistency of the porrige and remove from heat when done.


    As for the Jansson's Frestelse(Temptation), I didn't have a recipe for that one, but I found one on-line. I checked quite a few sources and they are all basically the same recipe. I still doubt that it is anything close to what you imagined!

    JANSSON'S FRESTELSE (JANSSON'S TEMPTATION)

    7 medium boiling potatoes; peeled and cut into 2 inch by 1/4 inch strips (sticks)
    2 1/2 tbsp butter
    2 tbsp vegetable oil
    2-3 large yellow onions thinly sliced (approx 4 cups)
    16 flat anchovy fillets - drained
    White pepper
    2 tbsp fine dry bread crumbs
    2 tbsp butter; cut into 1/4" cubes
    1 cup heavy cream
    1/2 cup milk

    Preheat oven to 400øF. Place the potato strips in cold water to keep
    them from discoloring. Heat 2 tablespoons of butter and 2 tablespoons
    of oil in a 10-12" skillet; when the foam subsides, add the onions
    and cook 10 minutes, stirring frequently, until they are soft but not
    brown.

    With a pastry brush or paper towels, spread a 1 1/2 to 2-quart
    souffle or baking dish with the remaining half tablespoon of butter.
    Drain the potatoes and pat them dry with paper towels. Arrange a
    layer of potatoes on the bottom of the dish and then alternate layers
    of onions and anchovies ending with potatoes. Sprinkle each layer
    with a little white pepper. Scatter bread crumbs over the top layer
    of potatoes and dot the casserole with the 2 tablespoons of butter
    cut into bits.

    In a small saucepan, heat the milk and cream until it
    barely simmers, then pour over potatoes.

    Bake in the center of the oven for 45 minutes or until the potatoes
    are tender when pierced with the tip of a sharp knife or skewer and
    the liquid is nearly absorbed.

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