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Thread: Substitutions for Tapenade???

  1. #1
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    Post Substitutions for Tapenade???

    Hi, I am wanting to make SusanL's Provencale Tarts, and could not find tapenade at my grocer. I bout some Progresso Eggplant Appitizer Caponata...Will this work? If not, what would be the best thing to use?
    TIA

  2. #2

    Post

    I really don't know anything about tapenade though I know caponata has eggplant, so I looked it up in Epicurious. Sounds to me like you're talking about several more ingredients in the caponata than in the tapenade, also different consistencies. Cook's Thesaurus suggests using olive butter as a substitute (which sounds about as common as my famed pickled seabeans), but they also referred me to a do-it-yourself recipe if no one else has ideas. My only concern about this is that Epicurious describes tapenade as a paste, whereas this sounds less pasty.

    ...ah well. I tried.

    Tapenade Dip

    1/2 c imported black olives (Alfonos or Kalamata), pitted
    1/4 c imported green olives (Sicilian), pitted
    4 anchovy fillets
    1 garlic clove
    2 Tbsp capers, thoroughly drained
    2 Tbsp oil-packed tuna, drained
    1 Tbsp lemon juice
    1 c fresh basil leaves, rinsed and patted dry, or more to taste
    1/4 c best-quality olive oil
    1/4 c Homemade Mayonnaise (optional)

    Combine black and green olives, anchovy fillets, garlic, capers,
    tuna, lemon juice and basil in the bowl of a food processor fitted
    with a steel blade. Process until smooth.

    With the motor still running, dribble in the oil to make a thick,
    fluffy sauce. For a lighter sauce, ideal for raw vegetables, blend
    in the mayonnaise.

    Taste, and correct seasoning. Scrape dip into a bowl and cover.
    Refrigerate until ready to serve. Tapenade will keep, refrigerated,
    for 1 week.

    About 1 1/2 cups

    Stuff it into sun-ripened tomatoes, hard-cooked eggs, or grilled
    baby eggplants. Thin it slightly and offer it as a dip for crudites,
    or toss it with cold pasta.

    --
    In checking back on the original threads, I see that sushibones used a jar of sundried tomato and olive relish instead of the the tapenade, and SusanL used a prepared olive spread (maybe the mysterious olive butter??)and added chopped kalamata olives.



    [This message has been edited by Gail (edited 01-24-2001).]

  3. #3

    Post

    I think most tapenades are primarily olive based. Here's a recipe for one that I've used before and it's pretty good. I'm sure you could go a little lighter on the oil, if you'd like--just add enough so that it's "pasty" as Gail said.

    TAPENADE


    This recipe can be prepared in 45 minutes or less.

    2 cups Kalamata or other brine-cured black olives (about 16 ounces)
    1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
    1/4 cup packed fresh flat-leafed parsley leaves

    In a colander rinse olives. Working with several olives at a time and using flat side of a large heavy knife, press olives to crush them, and remove pits. In a food processor pulse olives with oil until coarsely chopped. Tapenade may be made up to this point 3 days ahead and chilled in an airtight container.

    Chop parsley and stir into tapenade.

    Makes about 1 cup.


    Gourmet
    March 1999






  4. #4
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    Post

    The Williams-Sonoma Food Companion says that Tapenade is made from capers, anchovies and garlic; which are mashed into a paste, preferably with a mortar and pestlel.The word tapenade comes from the Provencal word tapeno, meaning capers, and these tiny buds are usually considered an essential part of the dish. Both green and black tapenades, made with either green or black olives, are usually available in jars in specialty-food stores and many supermarkets in the US.

    I would think that Gail's recipe using either black or green olives is more correct.

    It also said that the commercial brands would keep opened in the fridge for up to 6 months.



    [This message has been edited by sneezles (edited 01-24-2001).]

  5. #5
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    Post

    When I made these, I substituted a sun-dried tomato and olive relish which also had black & green olives, onions, capers, garlic, and balsamic vinegar. However I think the ingredients are less important that the texture. The relish had a texture similar to a chutney--medium chunks of ingredients surrounded by a small amount of a thick jam-like substance. If you can find something you like with that texture, and that would go well with the tomatoes and feta, I don't think it makes any difference what you use. The cherry tomatoes had more liquid than the relish did, so you probably don't want something that is more liquid than solid. The relish I used also had sugar added to it, so it had a slight sweetness that the tapenade wouldn't have. I think that with those caveats, you could use any similar relish/tapenade.

  6. #6
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    Gail and Mightyh, what wonderful recipes, I can't wait to try them!! I had purchased caponata also, in case my tapenade didn't work. I think I bought Alessi brand tapenade and added chopped kalamata olives to it. Just as Sushibones stated, it can't be too moist. One great thing about this recipe is that it doesn't have to be precise with ingredients. Caponata would give it a different taste as long as it is not too moist. I could see making mushroom or roasted red pepper type tapenades to put in it also. Because it is so easy to make, I imagined making different fillings to put in the tarts, sounds like a Sunday afternoon activity (but not this Super Bowl Sunday)! Let us know how they turn out!

  7. #7
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    Thanks everyone for the ideas and recipes. I am definitly going to try something for this sunday. So, I will try a couple different ones to see which turns out the best. I think I will look at sam's club for the pre-made tapenade, I will make one, and I will also go ahead and see if the caponata works. I'll let everyone know what happens, hopefully not a disaster Thanks again.

  8. #8

    Post

    Not sure if you have a Sam's Club around you, but I saw Tapenade there this week by the gourmet cheeses, etc. I have had this actual brand at my mom's house and it was very good.

  9. #9
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    Ok, I made the provencale tarts for Super Bowl, and they were a hit...
    I ended up going to Dean and Deluca's and buying a olive and fig tapanade...It was really good! of course for the price they ask for a little jar, it better be
    Everyone loved the recipe. I forgot it called for feta cheese, and used goat cheese instead, and I had to use grape tomatoes instead of cherry tomatoes, but I like these better anyway.

  10. #10
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    Talking

    Sherry--

    Isn't cooking fun? Don't you love being able to say "I loved this recipe!" after you've changed nearly every single ingredient to suit your own tastes and what is available? I'm glad all the input gave you a chance to give this a try, and that it worked out for you (and it wasn't even my recipe to begin with--but I sure liked it).

    Susan (#15 of 23 or somesuch)

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