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Thread: Homemade flavored tortillas??

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Homemade flavored tortillas??

    I oftentimes make our tortillas instead of buying them but I've never tried making any of the flavored kinds. Has anyone done this? Do you have any recipes to share??
    TIA
    "Let food be thy medicine" ~ Hippocrates

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Texas
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    We like to experiment from time to time and follow this advice:

    If you want flavored Flour Tortillas you can add many different seasonings:
    Chopped fresh herbs (like oregano, rosemary, etc.)
    A tsp. of dried herbs
    Freshly ground black pepper
    Minced jalapeños peppers
    Fresh minced garlic
    Replace the salt with garlic salt
    And anything you think will taste good, experiment

    When adding dry seasoning, always add to the dry ingredients first, and when adding “wet” seasoning add to the milk.

    And have tried these recipes:

    CHILE BLACK PEPPER TORTILLAS
    This produces an earthy-flavored burnished red tortilla that looks as good as it tastes.


    INGREDIENTS:
    -- 1 cup masa harina

    -- 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

    -- 1 tablespoon chile powder

    -- 1/2 teaspoon salt

    -- 2/3 cup water

    -- 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour

    INSTRUCTIONS: Stir together masa, pepper, chile powder and salt in a mixing bowl. Gradually add the water, stirring with a fork until you have a soft dough.

    Sprinkle flour on a work surface. Turn out dough and knead for 1 minute. Cover dough with an upside-down mixing bowl; let rest for 20 minutes. Cut 2 squares of plastic wrap large enough to fit the tortilla press. Place on bottom of the press. Pinch off a small ball of dough (about a tenth of the dough) and put in the press. Cover with second piece of plastic. Gently press. (You don't want a paper-thin tortilla or you will have difficulty peeling it off the plastic.) Gently peel off top piece of plastic by starting from the side nearest the handle. Peel off bottom plastic by gently peeling from the handle side. If you find the dough or tortilla is difficult to handle, sprinkle remaining dough with a few teaspoons of all-purpose flour, knead and press the next tortilla. (If you press tortillas all at once before cooking, cover them as you go with a damp towel to prevent them from drying out.)

    Place tortilla on a preheated comal or griddle. Cook for 40 seconds, then lift and look at the bottom. If tortilla is speckled, turn it over and cook for another 40 seconds. These tortillas should be undercooked slightly so they will fold easily into quesadillas without cracking. Repeat with remaining dough.

    Yields 10.


    Multi-Grain Tortillas
    These are modern-day corn and four tortillas, updated with some flavorful specialty flour added. Amaranth flour melds exceptionally well with the flavor of corn flour. Wild amaranth grain was widely used by the Apache and norther Mexico bakers. The tortillas bake up thick and are a good substitute for bread with a calabacitas or posole stew.
    Makes twelve 4-inch tortillas

    2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour or bread flour
    1-1/2 cups blue corn masa harina para tortillas or harinilla
    1/4 cup whole wheat pastry flour
    1/4 cup amaranth flour or mesquite flour
    4 teaspoons baking powder
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1-1/2 cups warm water
    1/4 cup (1/2 stick) cold butter, cut into pieces

    1) In a medium mixing bowl using your hands or a wooden spoon or in the bowl of a heavy-duty electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, combine the unbleached flour, the blue cornmeal, the whole wheat and amaranth flours, baking powder, and salt. Cut in the butter until crumbly, using a fork or pastry blender if making by hand. Gradually add the hot water to the flour mixture, stirring just until the dough sticks together, clears the sides of the bowl, and a soft firm ball is formed, adding a tablespoon of water at a time if the dough seems too dry. Cover the dough with plastic wrap and let rest for 45 minutes.

    2) To shape the tortillas, divide the dough into 12 equal portions. Shape each into a ball and place on a baking sheet or marble slab. Drape each ball around your forefinger, making a depression on the underside, which makes a mushroom shape and creates an air bubble to help it roll out into an even round. On a very lightly floured work surface, flatten the ball with your palm. (The flattened balls can rest on a greased baking sheet, covered tightly, for 30 minutes longer, if necessary.) Place one of the portions of the dough between 2 pieces of plastic wrap or wax paper. Press in a tortilla press, turning at regular intervals, until the desired thickness. Or roll out with a rolling pin to a 4-inch round, 1/4 inch thick. Stack between layers of plastic wrap to prevent drying out while pressing out the remaining dough. Bake as soon as possible.

    3) To bake the tortillas, heat a large ungreased heavy cast-iron skillet or comal over medium-high heat until a drop of water dances across the surface. Place the tortillas, one at a time, in the pan, and bake for about 2-1/2 minutes. When the dough looks dry and brown spots are formed, turn over to the other side and bake for 2 to 3 minutes. Keep flipping back and forth until the tortilla is soft, not crisp; it will puff up to l/2 inch thick. It is very easy to overbake, so pay close attention to the timing. Remove each tortilla to a clean towel. Cover until serving.


    Once you get a rhythm going, you can roll out a tortilla, put it on to cook and, while it cooks, roll out your next tortilla. Seems like an arduous process but, with this method, I could produce 8 tortillas in about 10 action-packed minutes. Be sure to rewrap your fresh tortillas each time you add another to the stack.

    If you like, you can substitute one cup of whole wheat flour for one cup of the all-purpose flour.
    Well-behaved women seldom make history!

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    THANKS, Sneezles! This info will be a big help!

    Have you ever tried adding sundried tomatoes?? Or do you have any suggestions for doing so?
    "Let food be thy medicine" ~ Hippocrates

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Location
    Texas
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    Originally posted by Chocolate Rose
    THANKS, Sneezles! This info will be a big help!

    Have you ever tried adding sundried tomatoes?? Or do you have any suggestions for doing so?
    No, I haven't done sundried tomatoes or spinach. I would think though that you'd either have to pulversize them or rehydrate, chopp and add to the "wet" ingredients. Not sure though, just a guess...
    Well-behaved women seldom make history!

  5. #5
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    Thanks, again!
    I'm also just not sure how to go about it. I'm wondering if the tomatoes in oil would work better or if a bit of the oil should be added to the ingredients themselves.
    "Let food be thy medicine" ~ Hippocrates

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    Connecticut
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    This is a recipe for pasta but at the end there are recipes for adding tomato paste for tomato pasta and spinach for spinach pasta. Maybe the amounts will be helpful in making flavored tortillas.

    Homemade Egg Pasta
    Serves 8

    3 ½ cups sifted all-purpose flour
    5 large eggs
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 tablespoon olive oil

    Make a mound of flour in the center of a large board. Make a well in the center of the flour. Break the eggs into the well. Sprinkle on the salt and add the oil. With the fingertips of one hand, or with a fork, slowly mix the eggs into the flour, gradually breaking away the walls of the well. When all the eggs are mixed with the flour, knead the dough until it is smooth and elastic. It will be very firm, and should be quite smooth. The kneading will take about 10 minutes.

    Cover the dough with an inverted bowl to prevent it from drying out while shaping the pasta.

    To make fettuccine, follow the directions which come with the pasta machine. Cut the dough into small pieces with a sharp knife and roll it into long strips. Dry the strips slightly on a broomstick stretched between two chairs, or on a wooden laundry rack. Do not let strips dry out too much or dough will be too brittle to cut into pasta.

    Adjust the machine to thickness desired and cut the pasta. Dry on racks until ready to use or sprinkle lightly with cornmeal and cover with plastic wrap until ready to use. Fresh pasta may be frozen in it soft state if well wrapped. To use: just drop frozen pasta into boiling, salted water and cook only until al dente, or just cooked. Fresh pasta cooks much faster than dry pasta and care must be taken not to overcook it.

    The whole process of making enough pasta for 8 persons will take about 2 hours. The taste and texture of homemade pasta is incomparable and well worth the effort.

    A wire-bottomed wooden tray is perfect for drying homemade pasta. Whole wheat, tomato and spinach are easy variations of basic egg pasta.

    To make tomato pasta, add 4 tablespoons of rich tomato paste to egg pasta.

    To make spinach pasta, add ½ cup finely pureed spinach to egg pasta.

    To make whole wheat pasta, substitute 2 cups whole wheat flour for 2 cups white flour. (the recipe will then be 1 ½ cups all-purpose flour and 2 cups whole wheat flour…..)

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Location
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    Originally posted by Chocolate Rose
    Thanks, again!
    I'm also just not sure how to go about it. I'm wondering if the tomatoes in oil would work better or if a bit of the oil should be added to the ingredients themselves.
    I think the ones in oil would work fine just chopped fairly well and added to the wet ingredients. And in looking at the pasta recipes that Searcher posted it wouldn't take much.
    Thanks for posting the pasta recipe, Searcher, I've been contemplating dragging out the pasta maker!
    Well-behaved women seldom make history!

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