Community Message Boards
Results 1 to 27 of 27

Thread: What is the best appliance for kneading bread dough?

  1. #1

    What is the best appliance for kneading bread dough?

    I had been kneading my bread dough with my 25 years old Oster Kitchen Center, but recently it is no longer able to handle the job. I guess it just got too old. My kitchen Center is still able to be used as a mixer, blender, food processor, juicer,sausage maker, ice crusher etc, but the motor just can't handle the bread dough anymore.

    So I was wondering, if I have to buy an appliance mainly for kneading bread dough, (I like to bake it in the oven), what would the best appliance be?

    My thinking is that eventually the Oster will have to be replaced, but I probably still have quite a few good years of use with it. It has so many attachments that I hate to give it up. But I would like to plan wisely for when the time comes to replace it.

    In other words if a bread machine is best for kneading dough, I might just get a basic one that would do that job well even if it doesn't have any other features. On the other hand, if a good mixer , or if a good food processor does the job better, I might decide the get that instead seeing as I will probably have to replace the Oster soon, so why spend the extra on a bread machine? Does that make sense?

    Any thoughts and suggestions on the subject are appreciated.

    Daniele
    newcook

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Central California
    Posts
    2,897
    I use my KA to knead dough and I'm very happy with it. It works wonderful, and I find I don't "overflour" the dough, like I may have when kneading by hand.

    I know some BB'ers have bread machines that they use for the mixing and kneading, and then bake the bread in the oven. I'm sure they'll chime in, and hopefully you can get enough info to decide what type of appliance would work best for you. Good luck!
    Dianne

  3. #3
    Do you use a KA mixer or a KA food processor? Or is there a combination one?

    Daniele
    newcook

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Central California
    Posts
    2,897
    Originally posted by newcook
    Do you use a KA mixer or a KA food processor? Or is there a combination one?

    Daniele
    I don't think there's a combination one, but I could be wrong. I have a professional 5 qt KA mixer. It has a dough hook, a wire whisk, and a regular beater( can't think of the real name!). I got it at Christmas and have used it to make bread, whip egg whites, make cookies, etc. It's wonderful. It also has the ability to hook attachments to it, which you can buy, for sausage making, pasta making, etc. Check out kitchenaid.com for different makes/models. The site has a lot of info, including recipes.

    My DH told everyone at work that they should go out and buy their wives a KA. I guess he thought I was very happy and appreciative
    Dianne

  5. #5
    I am soooooooooo tempted!!! My Oster has a 400 watt motor, I noticed the KA's with the stronger motors cost mucho dollars. I just don't know if I can handle that yet.

    Daniele
    newcook

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Metrowest MA
    Posts
    1,947
    Danielle, if you are only looking for something to knead dough, then you should check out some bread machines before you invest in a KA. I have both, and love them both, but if you already have an appliance that you are using as a mixer, you really don't need to spend all those $$$$. (I haven't used my KA for kneading bread yet b/c my ABM does a fine job.) You can probably get a decent ABM for not too much -- certainly a heck of a lot cheaper than a KA -- and it will do what you need it to. (No pun intended )
    ~ ~ Leslie ~ ~

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    1,242
    A heavy duty mixer like KitchenAid is ideal because the motor takes a great deal of punishment. However, there is nothing like a hand knead if you have the time. My husband makes great bread and he sets his watch timer for seven minutes and kneads his bread by hand. It's great workout, too . Resist the temptation to add more flour to keep the dough from sticking - instead use a dough-releaser (plastic rounded paddle thing) to help facilitate moving the dough around. Too much flour and your bread turns into a brick.
    "There's no food in your food!!" Joan Cusack to John Cusack in "Say Anything."

  8. #8

    Cool

    Hi, Daniele,

    I concur with Chiffonade-- there's nothing like getting into the dough with your hands (if you can; I've got this stupid ganglion cyst which makes kneading painful, I've discovered.) But, with me it's a sense of accomplishment thing, too.

    I don't do much bread-making these days, but I've tried with my food processor (big old honking Cuisinart from the Stone Ages) and with the dough hook from the KitchenAid mixer-- was MUCH happier with results from the KitchenAid.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Ozone Park, NY
    Posts
    2,675
    I have a KitchenAid mixer, and after more than 1 year I just used it the first time last month. It works great, no question there! And I'm sure it would be great for kneading dough as well.

    I just like to do it by hand. I remember Beth mentioning she had problems with her neck, and I have something like that too. Arthritis in my neck squeezing the nerves that go down my shoulders, arms and hands...but I'm glad the medication I am taking makes it so that I can still knead dough. Nothing like that satiny smooth feel of bread dough when it's starting to come together...I love it.


    Angela

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Near Fresno, CA
    Posts
    6,219
    I'm going to chime in from the bread machine bunch. I really like the fact that I can put everything in the machine, let it mix and knead then all I have to do is shape it or pan it, let it rise once more and then bake.

    Plus I have a timer feature on my machine that I can set to come on at a certain time. Works great!
    *Susan*

    "One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries."

    A.A. Milne

  11. #11
    Those of you who knead by hand have my admiration. That is what I did with the last two batches and I thought my arms were going to fall off. I also probably underkneaded the dough because I finally gave up. Not that I didn't eat it anyway, and I also enjoyed it.
    But that is what got me to wanting a new appliance.

    Daniele
    newcook

  12. #12

    Cool

    Originally posted by newcook
    Those of you who knead by hand have my admiration. That is what I did with the last two batches and I thought my arms were going to fall off. I also probably underkneaded the dough because I finally gave up. Not that I didn't eat it anyway, and I also enjoyed it.
    But that is what got me to wanting a new appliance.

    Daniele
    Really makes you appreciate those pioneers, eh? Imagine doing that every day, plus churning.

    Wonder if they had problems with flabby underarms...

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Rochester NY area
    Posts
    2,625
    Another vote for the KA mixer. I've done kneading by hand but just don't have the patience.

    I've also done kneading in the food processor (Cuisinart). It's fine but the volume it can handle is a lot less.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    7,088
    I don't really know what an Oster Kitchen Center is, but is it possible to have the motor serviced so that it can handle the dough once more? We have a small appliance store here in KC called Mar-Bec (sp?) and they service, repair and sell missing parts for all kinds of household appliances in addition to selling new ones. Might be worth checking in to if you have a similar type store. Since they service as well as sell new, they are pretty up front about whether it is better to repair or buy new. Just a suggestion.
    kathyb


    Less rhetoric, more cowbell!

  15. #15

    Cool

    Personally, Daniele, if you can spring it financially, I'd go for the KitchenAid. Why? There are all sorts of attachments available, so that in the end when the Oster Center finally heaves its final sigh, you can get grinder, juicer, pasta maker and sausage stuffer attachments if you want and can go from an Oster Kingdom into a future KitchenAid kingdom. Have you looked at the KA web site at all? http://kitchenaid.suresource.com/pro...ixers&level=1# Pick a mixer and there should be a drop down menu of available attachments.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    NashVegas, baby!
    Posts
    5,889
    I much prefer kneading by hand. To me, that's one of the reasons to make yeast bread in the first place ... It's not only very tactile, but is a great way to work out frustrations, etc.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    1,242
    Originally posted by Gail
    I've tried with my food processor (big old honking Cuisinart from the Stone Ages) and with the dough hook from the KitchenAid mixer-- was MUCH happier with results from the KitchenAid.
    I've never gotten much satisfaction from kneading in the Cuisinart either. The metal blade breaks the precious strands of gluten (the whole reason you knead bread!) and I've found the plastic dough blade basically ineffective.

    If it's a machine knead - KA is the way to go unless you have another very high-octane motor-driven mixer with a dough hook that can take long periods of hard work. Several manufacturers (like Kenwood) make heavy duty mixers. Beware of the word "Commercial." You'd be surprised how many appliances advertised as "commercial" will have their warranties voided by commercial use.
    "There's no food in your food!!" Joan Cusack to John Cusack in "Say Anything."

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Lone Star State
    Posts
    20,757
    I started making bread by hand only, and it certainly works, doesn't clutter your counter or cabinets, and you will get used to the time it takes -- turn on some good music or a TV show you're interested in and the time passes quickly. Music can really help, especially if you get a little unconventional with the kneading.

    I do have a KA now and use it to start the dough most of the time, but I finish it by hand. How much is starting and how much is finishing will vary with how my arms are feeling and the bread dough, but the KA gives me the flexibility. I have the professional 5 qt one -- I think it is 375 watts.

    I don't have all the attachments, but I do have the grinder, sausage stuffer and the pasta attachments. I think the slicer came with one of those, but I haven't used that one. With a KA, I think you have more control over bread doughs and more versatility with your machine even if it is not one of the huge new monster machines. I was told I should get the 375 to do bread doughs and pasta, especially when I told the guy at KA that I made a couple of Italian breads that were kneaded in the machine for 25-30 minutes. He couldn't believe that.

    They weren't making the higher powered ones then, and someday I may make a switch, but my point is that I have never had a problem with this one, even for pasta and the Italian breads you would probably never make by hand (I did once and broke my wooden spoon ). If you don't plan on making a lot of pasta or really pushing the machine, a standard one should do fine.

    Wheather you get a KA, and bread machine or just a beautiful new bowl with a wooden spoon and a dough scraper, I would suggest you finish your doughs by hand whenever possible. You really learn the feel that way and can make adjustments.

    While people have commented on not over adding flour in the KA, I have one recipe that seems to be too sticky, so the first time I made it, it felt too dry when I started kneading it by hand. I was able to wet my hands a couple of times and put enough moisture back into the dough to get it balanced before letting it rise. just afinger poke into the mixing bowl can't give you the same feel.

    A bread machine may be less expensive, depending on which model machine and which mixer you compare, but many of them take up as much or more room. If your mixer died, do you also need it for cakes, cookies or other mixing requirements?

    Oh, and a food processor is great for making pie crust, biscuits or scones, but I don't think they work for bread. I think I tried it once -- worked out the mess by hand. Plus, they aren't large enough for a lot of recipes.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    SO. CA
    Posts
    2,227
    You can get a nice breadmachine for about $99. I, too, use it only for mixing and the first rise. Never used the KA for bread, had an old KA 325w but now have the spiffy Artisan! Great, but as you say too expensive for mixing bread.
    Curleytop

  20. #20
    I took a peek at the KA website, and I think I will try for one of them. I won't be able to afford it without saving up first, my target should be around next Christmas.

    My kitchen space is quite limited and the space needed for a bread machine puts me off a little.

    In the meantime, I will take my old Oster to see if it can be revived for a bit but I know they don't make them anymore and it once took 1 year to get a repair part a while back. I think it must have a bent gear or something seeing as it still works fine for regular beating. It still kneads some too, but starts jumping up and down after a few minutes. I suppose I can knead by hand until then. Oh boy, now I'm really excited.

    Thanks for all your advice,

    Daniele
    newcook

  21. #21
    I too have a KA. I have used it to knead dough and it took a lot of strain off of me. I was also just looking at the Hamilton Beach mixers. I like the way they look but can't justify buying another one right now. The Hamilton beaches are about $140.

  22. #22
    I use either my KA Mixer, or my Zhoweveruspellit Bread maker to knead dough. The breadmaker has knead only settings.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Arlington, WA
    Posts
    5,748
    I used to hand knead bread but time became an issue & I switched to using my cuisinart with mixed results. they are very fast and will knead dough in a minute or two compared to 20-30 by hand, or with a bread machine. Every now and then, especially when working with stiff dough, the dough blade would walk up the center post and get jammed. a huge mess & expensive and inconvenient to replace the blade.
    I bought a simple bread machine that I use as a dough kneader. I agree that it works better for sticky dough because you are not so apt to add too much flour, and if it really does need some you can add it at the end. I've stuck with this system. a bread machine is not tiny, but it doesn't weigh much & I do not have the counter or closet space for a KA. They are heavy & as far as I can see require dedicated space to be remotely convenient. If I had to haul it from the garage it would not get used. The bread machine sits on the floor in the pantry & weighs maybe 5 pounds. I use my cuisinart multiple tiems daily so that gets the counter space.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Lone Star State
    Posts
    20,757
    Watch for sales and great buy opportunities. I have seen new KA mixers, the 4-1/2 quart size, on sale for about $120. You can watch for a refurbished one too. My only caution there would be to run it through all the tests and use it heavily when you first get a refurbished one. They now sell the refurbished ones with a shorter warranty. My theory is that if you are going to have a problem, it will most likely show up fairly soon. If it runs well for a while on heavy use, then it should keep going. A good time to try that Italian Batter bread!

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    SO. CA
    Posts
    2,227
    I realize the space problem with all those machines, and I took it in seriously when I had my kitchen remodeled 15 years ago. In my attached laundry room, I have huge pull out drawers, and I keep the breadmachine and meat slicer in one drawer. My mixer, blender, food processor are in the kitchen in an appliance garage. Even my foodsaver is hidden away in a drawer and I have an outlet inside the cabinet, I just open the drawer and vac my jars. I hardly ever use the bags or bagmaterial. I don't like clutter on the counters and all I have sitting out are the coffee maker and toaster, and a bowl of fruit (don't like cold fruit).
    Curleytop

  26. #26
    Originally posted by Curleytop
    I realize the space problem with all those machines, and I took it in seriously when I had my kitchen remodeled 15 years ago. In my attached laundry room, I have huge pull out drawers, and I keep the breadmachine and meat slicer in one drawer. My mixer, blender, food processor are in the kitchen in an appliance garage. Even my foodsaver is hidden away in a drawer and I have an outlet inside the cabinet, I just open the drawer and vac my jars. I hardly ever use the bags or bagmaterial. I don't like clutter on the counters and all I have sitting out are the coffee maker and toaster, and a bowl of fruit (don't like cold fruit).
    Meat slicer!! That must be one h*lluva drawer!

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    SO. CA
    Posts
    2,227
    Yep Gail, those are monster slide out drawers. Used to keep my sewing machine in there as well as the breadmachine on the same shelf. Come by sometime, now that we don't have to drag all over to the grocery store we will have more time! The assistant manager in Ralphs gave me a big hug (female) today when I did some shopping!
    Curleytop

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •