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Thread: Internal Temperature of Pork Chops???

  1. #1
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    Internal Temperature of Pork Chops???

    I want to try to bbq 2 boneless sirloin pork chops on my Jennair Grill. I like to use my instant read thermometer to check if they are done. (have always done my chops in oven before) What should the internal temperature be for them to be done??? WANT TO COOK THEM TONITE! THANKS!
    Curleytop

  2. #2
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    160 is the internal temp for pork chops.
    Well-behaved women seldom make history!

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    I think 145 would be the final temperature. Of course, they will continue to bake so I would take them off at 140. Today's pork doesn't have the same dangers of trichinosis so you don't have to cook it as high.

    Edited to say...I must be WAY off.
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  4. #4
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    I tried to edit, but I couldn't. I was WAY off...sorry. Those cooks on Food TV were on the rare side. This is what The New Food Lover's Companion, Second Edition from FoodTV.com says: Cooking it to an internal temperature of 137 degrees F will kill any trichinae. However, allowing for a safety margin for thermometer inaccuracy, most experts recommend an internal temperature of from 150 degrees to 165 degrees F, which will still produce a juicy, tender result.
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  5. #5
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    From the usda.gov website:

    THE DANGER ZONE (40 F-140 F)
    Bacteria grow most rapidly in the range of temperatures between 40 and 140 F, doubling in number in as little as 20 minutes. This range of temperatures is often called the DANGER ZONE. That's why the Meat and Poultry Hotline advises consumers to never leave food out of refrigeration over two hours. If the temperature is above 90 F, food should not be left out more than one hour.

    COOKING
    Raw meat and poultry should always be cooked to a safe internal temperature. Temperatures (160 to 212 F) reached in baking, roasting, frying and boiling will destroy bacteria that can cause foodborne illness.

    When roasting meat and poultry use an oven temperature no lower than 325 F. Cook ground meats (beef,veal,lamb, and pork) to an internal temperature of 160 F, and ground poultry to 165 F. Steaks and roasts cooked to an internal temperature of 145 F are medium rare, 160 F are medium, and 170 F are well done.

    For doneness, poultry breast meat should be cooked to an internal temperature of 170 F; 180 F for whole birds. Use a meat thermometer to assure that meat and poultry have reached a safe internal temperature.

    If raw meat and poultry have been handled safely, using the above preparation recommendations will make them safe to eat. If raw meats have been mishandled (left in the Danger Zone too long), bacteria may grow and produce toxins which can cause foodborne illness. Those toxins that are heat resistant are not destroyed by cooking. Therefore, even though cooked, meat and poultry mishandled in the raw state may not be safe to eat even after proper preparation.
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  6. #6
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    I don't want any beef cooked to 160...what's the point? It wouldn't taste like anything remotely resembling beef. I do cook hamburger that high because the bacteria is all through that.
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  7. #7
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    Thanks, you all! I surfed the web and I think 160-170 is correct.
    I don't think I would like it pink in the middle.
    I bought an electric grill not long ago, but you can't adjust the temp. and I think it is not as hot as it used to be.
    I had forgotten that I had the grilling module for my Jennair cooktop, and I installed it, and did a steak and chicken breasts on it already. Since the grill comes in 2 pieces, one for each of the burners on the left side, I use only one burner, enough for the 2 of us. Has anyone out there have a Jennair with a grill (I have had mine for about 16 years) and I also have the griddle. Dh used to bbq,
    but the bbq needed to be replaced, and he didn't want another. Sooo, now I have to do it all.
    Curleytop

  8. #8
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    Originally posted by mbrogier
    I don't want any beef cooked to 160...what's the point? It wouldn't taste like anything remotely resembling beef. I do cook hamburger that high because the bacteria is all through that.
    Well, they are just guidelines...and the point being meat that is safe to eat! I didn't edit it just for the pork but I know lots of people that eat beef blue...not me, though! And a pot roast cooked to 150 is going to be tough! It wasn't meant to say this is how you have to cook your meat they are simply guidelines. Knowing Curleytop's age I doubt she would venture to eat pink pork and even at 150 that chop is going to be running more red than pink.
    Removing it from the heat at 155 and factoring in the rest time the chop would reach the 160...and pork was the question!
    Well-behaved women seldom make history!

  9. #9
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    Thanks, the chops turned out fine! I cooked them to 160, shortly before being done I put on some bbq sauce! Might try a marinade next time, any suggestios?
    Curleytop

  10. #10
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    It's no longer necessary to cook pork to death. Extremely high temps for doneness of pork were established when pigs were slopped with garbage from households and trichinosis was a very real threat. Pigs eat better than some people now (which is part of the reason pork lost all its flavor ...).

    If a pork chop is thick, don't cook it past 145-150 on your instant read thermometer. It will continue to cook as it rests on a platter. We don't ever roast a pork loin to more than 145 or it winds up dry, tough and devoid of juice.
    "There's no food in your food!!" Joan Cusack to John Cusack in "Say Anything."

  11. #11
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    I just watched How to Boil Water of FoodTV and they were making pork chops. Frederic said to have the internal temperture at 140. These were thin chops too....I thought it seemed a low temp. He also said they should be a bit pink in the middle.
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  12. #12
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    I will undercook the porkchops next time, they were a tad tough at 160 Thanks for all the feedback gals!
    Curleytop

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