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Thread: Substitute for blue cheese

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Albuquerque, NM
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    Substitute for blue cheese

    Does anyone know of a substitute for blue cheese, gorganzola, etc., to use in recipes? I just don't like these kind of cheeses, but I've seen some recipes that use them that sound good, except for this one ingredient!
    Jayne

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    4,211
    Do you like feta? That would do for a lot of them. So would an aged and crumbly cheddar, in some cases.

    Basically, you'd want to choose a cheese you like that has a fairly distinctive taste of its own (and not, of course, one that would clash openly with the rest of the ingredients in the recipe).

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Grand Rapids, MI
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    1,833
    You obviously won't get the same flavor if you substitute (which is what you are going for Feta will have somewhat the same consistency and is a different and more mild flavor. Goat Cheese is even more mild and the crumbles could work as well. I did not care for blue cheese too much either at one time, but now I like it as a flavor to dishes, but still think it's a little strong sometimes. My DH is all about strong cheese so I am starting to get more used to it.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
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    If you have the resources (a good cheese shop) you might also want to experiment with different varieties of blue cheese. They're not all alike.

    F'rinstance, I recently bought a Spanish blue called Cabrales, and whoa! I thought I was a seasoned cheese veteran, but I'm not old enough for Cabrales. There's a cheese that you don't forget having eaten; it had an impact to it that reminded me of strong likker (not that it tasted anything like booze -- but a similar unsubtle brutality). Then last week, I bought Smuggler's Blue, and that was mild, complex, and delicious, with hardly any "bite" -- more resembling, really, one of the "bloomy" cheeses such as Camembert, only without the same kind of mushroomy taste.

    Most good small cheese shops are more than happy to let you taste a few different kinds of cheese if you ask.

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