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Thread: Baked brie in pastry-- rind on, or removed?

  1. #1
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    Baked brie in pastry-- rind on, or removed?

    I'm baking a brie "en croute" and the recipe doesn't specify to remove the rind. Wouldn't it be weird to keep the rind on since it's hard and you'd have to eat the pastry then eat the melted brie inside of the rind?
    Vicci


    Can't you just eat what I put in front of you? Do you have to know what it is?
    Ria Parkinson, Butterflies (BBC, 1978-83)

  2. #2
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    I'm interested in hearing the replies to this question, because yesterday at work someone brought in a baked brie in a pastry crust (with almonds and jam) and it had the rind on it. I tasted the rind (because I've read on this BB that some people eat it) and decided that I really do prefer it without. I can see how difficult it would be to prepare without the rind, but it seems so much more edible!

    I love brie, should I perhaps learn to eat the rind?
    Julie

  3. #3
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    I love to eat the rind. brie wouldn't be brie to me without the rind. I say leave it on!

  4. #4
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    I had one in a restaurant this week that had the rind on it, and I didn't like it. IMHO, if you like the rind, then bake it that way, and if you don't, cut it off first. Also, I don't think it's as pretty baked with the rind on.

  5. #5
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    I've only had brie once before, and can't remember if I ate the rind or not. So I guess I'll compile all or your responses tomorrow night and see which "side" wins!
    Come on, everyone, I need more votes here!
    Vicci


    Can't you just eat what I put in front of you? Do you have to know what it is?
    Ria Parkinson, Butterflies (BBC, 1978-83)

  6. #6
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    I'm cracking up reading this two completely different opinions - this is great! I can't wait to see more
    Julie

  7. #7
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    I've never had brie without the rind, so it would be weird to me if someone cut it off before serving -- like they'd never had brie before and didn't understand the rind was edible.

  8. #8
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    I used to cut off the brie rind, but now I love it. When I have baked it in pastry (with sliced almonds on top), I have always left the rind on.

    Sami
    Don't give up, Moses was once a basket case.

  9. #9
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    Ugh, I think the rind is disgusting. Personally, I wouldn't eat it with the rind left on, but that's just me. Is this just for yourself, or are you serving others? If you're serving others, I'd definitely leave it off. People who eat brie will likely eat it even sans rind, but people who dislike the rind may avoid it altogether.

  10. #10
    I'm anti-rind as well, but wouldn't it get all squishy if you took it off?

    I've made it before, with the rind on, and I just scrape out the yummy inside. Guess it kind of defeats the whole purpose of the pastry though!

  11. #11
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    Oh boy, I can see I'll be of no help...sometimes I eat it, sometimes I don't

    I've never had the baked w/o...but I have been known to cut it off...usually in a sandwich I leave it on

    So do you all think it depends on the quality of the brie???

    ~Gail
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    If, therefore, there be any kindness I can show or any good thing I can do any fellow being, let me do it now and not defer or neglect it, as I shall not pass this way again."
    -William Penn (1644-1718)

    ~~www.Nurse-Gail.com~~

  12. #12
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    Every baked brie I have ever eaten has had the rind on. I would think it would melt all over the place if you took it off. I think it helps the cheese hold its shape.

  13. #13
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    Well, I usually compromise - I cut off just the TOP rind of the round of brie and leave the rest. Just make sure you keep the cut side UP!

  14. #14
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    Originally posted by KelLeg
    Every baked brie I have ever eaten has had the rind on. I would think it would melt all over the place if you took it off. I think it helps the cheese hold its shape.
    I was thinking about this more and I agree, here.

    I can certainly understand if people don't like the rind. It isn't for everyone. But I think it is a given that Brie and Croute is going to have the rind, so brie-lovers who don't like the rind know that they either shouldn't eat it or should eat around the rind.

    I think the reason the recipe doesn't say to remove the rind is because you aren't supposed to. It would be too much work and too much mess.

    My opinions here only... just because I have never heard of a brie en croute without the rind doesn't mean they don't exist. maybe they do?

  15. #15
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    I'm with Crackers. I cut off the top, but leave the sides and bottom to hold the shape. I don't like to eat rind.
    Margaret

  16. #16
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    I think the recipe intends for you to keep the rind on. I also agree that the taste of the rind might depend on the quality of the brie. I just recently realized there are different kinds from single, double and triple cream bries and I bet there is a difference in the rind taste too.
    I wear my toolbelt in the kitchen...

  17. #17
    SLFlyt Guest
    DH and I always get baked brie at our favorite restaurant in Naples, Florida. They serve it in croute with a very nice rasperry sauce on the side. So delicious. It DOES have the rind on. We're talking about the little white hard rind, right? Keep it on. It's impossible to remove anyway!

  18. #18
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    Originally posted by SLFlyt
    DH and I always get baked brie at our favorite restaurant in Naples, Florida. They serve it in croute with a very nice rasperry sauce on the side. So delicious. It DOES NOT have the rind on. Of course not. That wouldn't taste good!
    ok. I stand corrected!

  19. #19
    SLFlyt Guest
    ok. I stand corrected!
    NO, you were right.

  20. #20
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    When I make the brie en croute, I buy the baby brie round at costco and it doesn't have such a hard rind, so of course you leave it on. With brie with a hard rind, I usually cut off the top and leave the rest to keep it from falling apart. However, My girlfriend made it and she said the cheese never really got oozy since she didn't cut the rind off.

    Lisa

  21. #21
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    I used to do a brie en croute with mushrooms sauteed with brandy, beef broth, and cassis (soo good, but so many calories!)--I always used the baby brie (about 6" across) and left the rind on. I actually think it helps with structural integrity, even once you cut into it and everything sort of starts oozing everywhere anyway. But it really is just a matter of personal preference. I will say that I think it would be a tremendous PITA to try to remove the rind from an entire little round brie, not to mention that I would think you'd waste a large amount of the inside. That alone would probably be enough to make me leave the rind on, even if I didn't prefer it that way.

  22. #22
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    I love the rind; I agree that brie wouldn't be brie to me without it!
    Lynne


    To err is human, to forgive, canine.
    -- Anonymous

  23. #23
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    Gilgamesh, is there a recipe for your brie en croute with mushrooms and brandy? OMG that sounds good.

    I don't have much to add to the rind vs. no rind debate. I don't mind the rind, and have always left it on when making baked brie. But if you wanted to take it off, I would try popping the brie in the freezer for a few minutes to firm it up--I think it would be much easier to take the rind off that way.
    I believe in the forest, and in the meadow, and in the night in which the corn grows. -Henry David Thoreau

  24. #24
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    Althea--sure thing. This isn't difficult, but note that the mushrooms take about an hour, and you should chill the assembled brie for at least an hour, so start early in the day. We got one of these one Christmas from some fancy food place, and it was great, but it was also like $35--so my XDH and I played around until we came up with a replica we liked. Geez, no wonder we gained 150 lbs between the two of us.....

    BRIE AND MUSHROOMS IN PUFF PASTRY

    16 oz white mushrooms, washed & sliced
    1 medium onion, diced very fine OR 4-5 finely minced shallots
    2 Tbl butter or margarine
    2 Tbl olive oil
    1 can Campbell's Beef Boullion (the double strength stuff)
    4-5 oz wine (fruity, not dry—I generally use red, but have used white zin)
    4-5 oz Creme de Cassis
    2 oz brandy
    1 oz dry sherry or vermouth
    1 bay leaf
    1 pinch each: tarragon, oregano, rosemary, marjoram
    1 package (17¼ oz) frozen puff pastry
    2 8 oz wheels brie (or one 15½ oz wheel, cut in half horizontally)
    1 egg yolk
    1 Tbl cream or milk

    Melt butter and oil in frying pan; add mushrooms and onion/shallot and sauté slightly. Add all liquids (but using only half the Cassis) and stir; sprinkle in spices. Let simmer over low heat, stirring occasionally; when about 2/3 of liquid is evaporated, add remaining Cassis. Continue cooking until almost all liquid is gone (this takes 45-60 minutes; be patient). Remove mushrooms to small bowl with a slotted spoon. Let puff pastry thaw 20-30 minutes until pliable. Unfold one sheet on a lightly floured surface; press together at folding seams (you don't want these to split open later; if the pastry breaks along one seam, overlap edges and mush together). Roll out pastry to about 1/8" thick and cut into a circle about 11" in diameter; reserve scraps. Place ½ mushrooms in small mound in center, and place wheel of brie on top. (If using a big wheel cut in half, place cut side down against mushrooms.) Fold up pastry to enclose wheel, pleating and pressing edges together as you go (if it doesn't seem to be sticking, use some of the egg wash below to seal). When cheese is snugly enclosed, invert onto a parchment or foil-lined baking sheet, seam-side down. Repeat with other wheel of brie and remaining mushrooms. Cut decorative shapes from remaining pastry. Mix together egg yolk and cream in a small bowl; brush over pastry, place decorations on top, pressing down gently, and brush again with egg wash. Refrigerate until firm, at least one hour; cover bowl of egg wash and place in refrigerator.
    Preheat oven to 400°. Brush pastries once again with remaining egg wash and bake 30 minutes until nicely puffed and golden brown. Use a wide spatula to transfer pastries to serving plates (being very careful not to pierce pastry when removing from baking sheet). Let cool for at least 30 minutes before serving with crackers. This can be made ahead and frozen for 1-2 months; place direct from freezer on non-stick baking sheet and bake at 350° for 35-45 minutes until heated through (check with a cake tester). You'll lose a little texture, but it's a hell of an impressive thing to whip out if friends drop in unexpectedly for cocktails.

  25. #25
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    Thank you, thank you! This looks beyond delicious. I'm definitely making this for a Christmas party.
    I believe in the forest, and in the meadow, and in the night in which the corn grows. -Henry David Thoreau

  26. #26
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    I make a baked brie quite often and I've tried it once without the rind. BIG mistake. As others have mentioned, it DOES run all over the place. Of course, that didn't stop us from scraping it up with forks and eating it like the little piggies we are in my family, but still...

    I personally dislike the rind on brie when it's not baked. However, when I wrap it in pastry, I have yet to notice the taste of the rind. That's my $0.02.

  27. #27
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    Smile THANKS EVERYONE!

    I appreciated all of your responses. I've never baked a brie, and never even eated a baked brie (that I can remember)so your responses helped a lot. It's for a Christmas party and, so that it keeps its shape, I will keep the rind on. Whoever doesn't like it can toss it, but I really need for this baby to look pretty!
    Vicci


    Can't you just eat what I put in front of you? Do you have to know what it is?
    Ria Parkinson, Butterflies (BBC, 1978-83)

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