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Thread: Will spuds roast at 350 degrees?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    Philadelphia
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    Unhappy Will spuds roast at 350 degrees?

    BFs Irish mother is here for the holiday, i can't get the spuds wrong!!! :-)

    I'm planning on roasting the turkey at 350.. will spuds actually roast at that temperature, or would i be better off roasting them at 450 for 1/2 an hour while the turkey's resting???

    I know what i want for christmas... a double oven!!!!!

    Thanks so much for any advice... now... where's that bottle of wine!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
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    If you par-boil the spuds first and then roast at 450 while the turkey is resting they should come out perfect!!
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    I just talked to my Welsh MIL about this on Saturday and they should be fine. Also - here is a recipe from the BBC's Good Food magazine:

    Golden-crusted roasties
    There are three secrets to roasting spuds: buy a not too floury, not too waxy potato, such as Maris Piper (Yukon Gold is a good US-available sub); use duck or goose fat, or beef dripping; don't try to cook the potatoes in advance - they'll look the part, but won't have the mandatory crusty coat and fluffy inside combo. Roast spuds are surprising tolerant about temperature - they might prefer a hotter oven, but will still cook, and brown, in the more moderate heat required for roasting turkey. If necessary, use the turkey's resting time to zap up the heat.

    2.5kg/5lb potatoes, peeled and cut into even 6 cm (~2 inch) chunks
    about 300g/10oz goose or duck fat, or beef dripping
    Sea Salt

    1. Preheat oven to 375F. Put the potatoes in plenty of cold salted water, bring to the boil, then cook for 8 minutes. Drain thoroughly in a colander. Either scratch their surfaces with a fork, or swish them around the colander until the outsiders are roughed up and shaggy. (this makes them cruster )
    2. Meanwhile, put the fat or dripping in a large, heavy roasting tin and heat in the oven until very hot and slightly hazy. Carefully add the potatoes, rolling them until well coated. Roast for 1-1 1/4 hours, turning once or twice as you baste the turkey. Remove when golden-crusted and tender, and season well before serving.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    Philadelphia
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    ooh thank you both so much... I actually have a "test batch" in the oven right now cooking at 375... finger's crossed

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    NC
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    Baked potatoes are very accomodating. There can be baked at most any temp - they will just take longer at lower temperatures.
    Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way you cope with it is what makes the difference.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Delaware
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    I often do roasted potatoes at 350, but they need a blast of high heat at the end to get a crisp crust (these are "roasted" potatoes, not "baked", right? They are peeled and cut into largeish pieces?). Conveniently, the meat also wants to rest out of the oven before carving.

    So I roast them at 350 for almost an hour along with the meat, remove the meat (and cover it with foil), and then crank the oven up to 450-500 for 15-20 minutes. The potatoes color and crisp nicely, and the meat juices are all reabsorbed. I do not parboil them first.

    Now, I will say that roasted potatoes are *best* if you parboil and place into preheated fat in a 400 or so oven. But the way I described first is a good second best, and generally the only option if you only have one oven and need to cook a large piece of meat.

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