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Thread: Non-stick skillets in the oven

  1. #1
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    Non-stick skillets in the oven

    I bought an inexpensive non-stick skillet at Tarjé about a year and half ago and have been very ahppy with it. However, I see more and more recipes that call for a non-stick that goes from stovetop to oven, often saying that if your pan has a plastic handle, wrap it in two layers of aluminum foil. I'm skeptical. Can you really put that in a very hot oven and not melt the handle? I so don't want to go out and buy a new pan...

  2. #2
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    Personally I would be hesitant to put something in the oven which is what my original motivation was to get some good pans that have metal handles.

    Cheap non-stick is only supposed to go up to 350 degrees. Calphalon nonstick is good up to 450 degrees and I think the Calphalon One nonstick is even higher.

    Non metal handles are also good only up to 350 degrees.

    You can get some great bargains on Amazaon for Calphalon Commercial nonstick which I love. Macy's also was carrying a 5 quart Calphalon One nonstick pan for $100 which was a great price -- I almost bought it but I REALLY don't need it.

    With a lot of the recipes, non-stick isn't necessary except for clean up though. I have a 7 quart stainless steel Belgique saute pan which I bought at Macy's at a good price which works for large quantities which won't work in my 3 quart nonstick saute.

    Dutch ovens go from stove top to oven also. I just bought a 4 quart Caphalon Commercial nonstick for about $40 which I am still thinking of returning.

    My next major cookware purchase is going to be the 6 quart All Clad buffet casserole (e.g. Dutch oven) which I saw on the internet for about $140.

  3. #3
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    I didn't know it was supposed to be OK up to 350, though I'd rather not have that restriction either. But you hit on the two reasons it took me so long to buy this thing (and then to get a cheap one): I already have Calphalon and Le Creuset and didn't need another piece except for when I really do need non-stick (my second reason for not buying one sooner; as you say, it's not always necessary, though for fish or tofu it makes a huge difference).

    Guess next time I come across a recipe that calls for putting it in the oven I'll just take my chances if it's under 350. Meanwhile I'll keep my eye out for one with a metal handle...if I can get it on the cheap. Thanks.

  4. #4
    The pans I posted about on the other pans thread are non-stick, can be used on high heat, go in the dishwasher, in the oven, you can use metal utensils in them, have heavy bottoms with great heat distribution. I've had them for a year, use them everyday, have put them in the oven, used metal utensils (but carefully, I didn't want to abuse the privilege)and they are as good as new. I am not sure if I ever put them in the dishwasher, they are so easy to clean by hand. I don't know why they are not more known.

    Daniele
    newcook

  5. #5
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    Canice

    Gee I rambled incoherently in my message.

    What I meant to write is that when I've analyzed a lot of recipes that start on the stove and finish in the oven, they don't really need non-stick finishes. I've made in regular SS with no problems.

    I do love my nonstick Calphalon roasting pan because the clean up is so easy. Since I don't make gravy, I could care less about the pan juices. When I made my customary stuff -- roasted veggies, roasted chicken with marinade etc. in my regular SS pans, the clean up was really a *****. I recently made the Pomegranate Chicken THighs receipe from CL and I can't imagine what clean up would have been in a regular pan -- even with the tinfoil the recipe recommended. I probably would have tossed the pan. With the Calphalon the mess literally slid off the pan.

    I do recommend nonstick roasting pans for that recipe. For whatever reason the stovetop to oven recipes (or at least the ones I've used) don't have the same clean up problem. Probably because most of them start by saueing on the stove top and then deglazing by adding the liquid and other ingredients and then placing in the oven.

  6. #6
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    Daniele, can you tell me which thread that was? I'll check it out! If I can get one reasonably priced open stock maybe I'll do that. Editing to say...Found the thread - thanks.

    Funny, blazedog, we were out last fall when we saw a Calaphalon non-stick roasting pan for about $50. Since the price of the top of the line models just kills me, I bought the $50 one, knowing that it's not good for gravy, but like you I don't make gravy anyhow. I hadn't thought about using it for things with sticky marinades -- I once made game hens roasted in red pepper jelly..OMG, talk about "just toss the pan". What a humongo pain in the rear!

  7. #7
    Canice check this thread where I originally posted the info and picture of the set (pans can be purchased separately)

    original thread

    Daniele
    newcook

  8. #8
    I don't know if this link will work, but this is where they were purchased from (my mother bought them in the store, not from the website though)

    http://www.CanadianTire.ca

    Daniele
    newcook

  9. #9
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    Canice -- Yes that's the model I went with -- only guaranteed for 10 years instead of a lifetime.

    Given the pleasure it's given me and the drudgery it's saved me from since buying it a few months ago, I will gladly replace it 10 years from now

    Actually I love it so much that I probably would be happy even with a lesser guarantee -- even a year since my time scubbing baked on honey/balsamic vinegar/hoisin sauce etc. is probably more than worth $4 a month. - but for $5 a year -- how can you beat it?

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