Community Message Boards
Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Can I chop garlic in advance?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    East Tennessee
    Posts
    3,556

    Can I chop garlic in advance?

    I would love to be able to chop several cloves of garlic at once for the week, instead of doing a couple of cloves almost every night. Could I chop it all and keep it in the fridge for several days? Just as is, or with a little water or olive oil to keep it moist? I don't want it to end up tasting like the bottled minced garlic you can buy (which I don't like), but is that what I am going to wind up with if I try to do this? I prechop a lot of other veggies and it saves me a lot of time each night, but for some reason I am unsure about the garlic.


    Claire

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Hollywood, California
    Posts
    10,928
    A week should be fine and it's great to store in olive oil as it enhances the oil when you use it.

    Anything longer than that and you are starting to push the envelope. I have read that chopped garlic stored long term in oil is a source of food poisoning -- not so the stuff in stores which is probably pasteurized or something.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    East Tennessee
    Posts
    3,556
    Thanks Blazedog. I don't think I would keep it for any longer than a week, and maybe I will foodsaver it just to be sure it doesn't grow any little beasties The flavor should be fine, though, right (not bitter like the bottled stuff)?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Hollywood, California
    Posts
    10,928
    I haven't noticed any off flavors.

    Personally I think a food saver would be over kill for a week since I assume you would be using it intermittently during the week.

    I've never had it develop mold in such a short period of time and I just store in a little Glad container.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    East Tennessee
    Posts
    3,556
    Sounds good. Thanks!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    IL
    Posts
    12,505
    I think I'd buy the jarred stuff in that case. I've never tried it myself, but how bad can it be especially if you aren't using the fresh stuff right away. It would save time all together. Maybe someone who has actually used the jarred stuff can comment though on the taste of it.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Hollywood, California
    Posts
    10,928
    I've used the jarred stove not packed in oil and fresh garlic is immeasurably better -- even after a few days.

    I have somtimes bought pre-peeled cloves of garlic from TJ to save time. I will throw 20 or so (I LOVE garlic) in the mini Cuisie when cooking something on Sunday and then will have the rest to use for the week.

    I am NOT above using the pre-jarred stove either as I keep it in the refrigerator also. It is WAY better than dried garlic or garlic powder (except when a recipe specifically calls for those ingredients obviously like the Sticky Rotisserie Chicken

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    16
    Delurking here. I would worry about Botulism too much to prechop garlic and store it in oil for even a few days. Oil and garlic is a haven for Botulism spores. If you must, please keep the garlic and oil in the coldest part of your fridge. Sorry to delurk with a negative comment. I wouldn't want you to become deathly sick because of a few saved steps in the kitchen.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    24,226
    I have to agree with wookiecookie that storing it in oil is not a good idea. Found some information and it seems that wine would be a better choice:

    Storing
    First a word of caution: NEVER allow garlic in oil to sit at room temperature. It is a hotbed for botulism. Keep it refrigerated or frozen at all times.
    Fresh garlic kept in a dry, dark, cool place will keep for a long time. Some use special containers for storing garlic. A pretty garlic keeper in your kitchen is a cheerful decorating item, but garlic can also be kept in something as simple as a brown paper bag. Just never keep your garlic in your refrigerator. It will sprout and become bitter. If you don't use that much garlic and know that the bulb will be sitting there for a long time, it is better to freeze it or store it by one of the many methods described below.
    There are lots of other ways to store garlic. What some people do in order to make them last is cutting them up into thin slices and then drying them. You can get food driers at places like K-Mart or Wal-mart. The sliced garlic can be reconstituted by adding them to a pot or casserole. You may also grind the dried slices into powder. Pureeing is another good method to preserve garlic and always have fresh garlic at hand. Puree in a blender or food processor and freeze. Personally, I prefer the garlic not as a puree, but in small pieces. Using a food processor, I simply pulse until the garlic pieces are the size I want, making sure that I don't place too much garlic in the processor at a time in order to avoid too great variation in the size of the pieces or the garlic turning to mush. Some then wrap the chopped garlic in small packets of plastic and freeze them. You can also add oil to the garlic mixture, 1 part garlic to 2 parts oil, and freeze it in a container or - as I prefer - in ice cube trays. That makes it easy to pop out the garlic you need. Some microwave unpeeled cloves for about 30 seconds and freeze them in plastic wrap or a freezer bag. Some freeze whole heads and tear off cloves as needed, but personally I find that this alters the flavor too much. I prefer storing peeled garlic cloves in oil and keeping them in the freezer, as freezing raw, unprotected garlic greatly changes its flavor and texture. If you prefer to keep your garlic in the refrigerator, submerge the garlic cloves in wine instead of oil. Dr. George York, University of California at Davis has provided this method for acidifying garlic in order to make it safe: Cover peeled garlic cloves with vinegar and soak the cloves for 12 to 24 hours. Drain off the vinegar. It may be reused as garlic-flavored vinegar. Cover the garlic cloves with oil. Refrigerate the garlic/oil and use within 3 months. You may also mix pureed or minced garlic with butter (about 5-6 cloves per stick of butter), shape the mixture into a log rolled in wax paper and freeze, tightly wrapped in plastic. You can then cut off pieces as needed to enhance a steak, drop it into a soup or sauce, or use for sautéing. Just make sure that you use it before the butter goes rancid.


    Copyright © 2003 www.TheGarlicStore.com
    Well-behaved women seldom make history!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    East Tennessee
    Posts
    3,556
    Interesting. I definitely don't want to give anyone botulism! With all of this information, though, I am sure I can find system that works better for me than chopping 1-2 cloves each night, without sacrificing flavor or safety.

    Thanks,
    Claire

  11. #11
    I am sure all of you 'South of the Border' folks have the little frozen cubes. The ones we get here (Toronto) are by 'Toppits', there are 20 cubes, each one equaling 1 teaspoon. They also have cilanatro, dill and parsley. They are far better than the bottled (which I too have in my fridge and am not adverse to using for certain recipes) as in fresher taste. I have actually used them in my caesar salad when in a hurry and have not really noticed much of a difference. They just pop out of the little tray - extremely handy!

    My point being, I 'think' you could freeze little clumps on a cookie sheet/whatever and then freezer bag?????

    Elaine

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •