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Thread: Joy of Cooking Pancake recipe

  1. #1
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    Joy of Cooking Pancake recipe

    After two failed attempts at pancakes I would love to make my failsafe recipe - the buttermilk pancake recipe from the Joy of Cooking.

    Unfortunately, we are at our cottage and the cookbook is 120 miles away at home. I just called my Mom and she doesn't even own the cookbook.

    Would anyone be kind enough to post the ingredients and quantities?

    I'll definitely import it into MC so I'll have it.

    Much thanks in advance for your help.

    Nancy

  2. #2
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    Here you go:

    Basic Buttermilk Pancakes

    Whisk together in a large bowl:

    1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
    3 tablespoons sugar
    1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1/2 teaspoon baking soda

    Whisk together in another bowl:

    1 1/2 cups buttermilk
    3 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
    2 large eggs
    1/2 teaspoon vanilla (optional)

    Pour the wet ingredients over the dry ingredients and gently whisk them together, mixing just until combined.

    Spoon 1/3 cup batter onto the preheated griddle for each pancake, nudging the batter into rounds. Cook until the top of each pancake is speckled with bubbles and some bubbles have popped open, then turn and cook until the underside is lightly browned. Serve immediately or keep warm in a 200 degree oven while you finish cooking the rest.
    Okay...it's time to pull up your big-girl panties and get on with it. (Seen on a bathroom wall.)

    Visit my blogs: Cooking the Books

    For recipes only, visit the companion blog: Cooked Up.

  3. #3
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    Cookin4Love and HealthyinMN -

    Thank you so much for posting - and so fast too! I'm in the middle of nowhere on a dial-up and thought - I'll post to the CL list, maybe someone will help.

    I was looking for the buttermilk pancake recipe - Cooking4Love that looks like it. I've copied it to MC (I'd love to get all my cookbooks in there!)

    Thanks again - those other pancakes were gross! And I have a pile of blueberries and NH maple syrup just waiting until after my bikeride.

    Nancy

  4. #4
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    You're more than welcome. It was a nice break from reading page after page of education sociology cr@p!
    Okay...it's time to pull up your big-girl panties and get on with it. (Seen on a bathroom wall.)

    Visit my blogs: Cooking the Books

    For recipes only, visit the companion blog: Cooked Up.

  5. #5
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    Clearly this isn't the JoC recipe I made that says something like "let batter sit 4 hours". Yeah, right. Like, get up at 3AM, make the batter and set your alarm for 7?

  6. #6
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    Originally posted by Canice
    Clearly this isn't the JoC recipe I made that says something like "let batter sit 4 hours". Yeah, right. Like, get up at 3AM, make the batter and set your alarm for 7?
    Nope. I wouldn't get up at 3 to make pancakes for anyone, either. Is that recipe out of the old Joy , Canice? This is out of the newer version; I didn't even look at the old one. This is the one I make every time my granddaughter comes over--she always wants pancakes. The first time I made them for her, she was about 4. She looked around the kitchen at all the ingredients and said, "Did you know that you can just get some stuff out of a box and make these? That's what my mom does!"

    I did not pass my cooking genes on. I am a lonely, lonely cook!
    Okay...it's time to pull up your big-girl panties and get on with it. (Seen on a bathroom wall.)

    Visit my blogs: Cooking the Books

    For recipes only, visit the companion blog: Cooked Up.

  7. #7
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    Originally posted by Cookin4Love
    I did not pass my cooking genes on. I am a lonely, lonely cook!
    A couple of years ago a friend of mine made popcorn for her son and his pal - they were around 7 - and the friend was slack-jawed at the crazy thing he saw: a pot, oil, a stove.....

    I think that receipe was from the penultimate edition (1977?) of JoC. I use the newer one now myself, except for the lamb marinade. Can top the version in the '77 edition.

  8. #8
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    I would never trade in my '77 edition, either. I think a comparison of that edition with the current one is very interesting. It's really a snapshot of how the cooking habits of Americans have changed. As I recall, the newer one has no candy recipes, and few cake/pie/cookie recipes. The ones it does have are very different from the classics in most cases. Anyway, it's easy to find my favorite recipes in the old edition--they're the pages that open easily because of all the flour that's sifted between them, or the pages that stick where sugar syrup dripped on them...you know. Let's just say it's well loved. It was my first cookbook ever. Would you believe that I grew up in a house without even a single cookbook present?
    Okay...it's time to pull up your big-girl panties and get on with it. (Seen on a bathroom wall.)

    Visit my blogs: Cooking the Books

    For recipes only, visit the companion blog: Cooked Up.

  9. #9
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    Is that because cooking was passed on mother to daughter or because.....?
    I was an adult before I found out my mother hated to cook. My parents were born in the '20s and ate simply (I don't recall any cookbooks around either). My mom had three kids and both parents worked full time. My mother usually went to make her own mother dinner after work before fixing dinner for the family and we always had the classic meat or chicken, starch, one green, one yellow vegetable. I look back on it, and that's a LOT for one person, and one who hated to cook, at that!

  10. #10
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    My mother hated to cook, wasn't good at it, and didn't do it often. There were a few things she did well: fried chicken, um...that's it. We had a lot of tuna in milk gravy on toast, hamburger in milk gravy on toast, etc. She occasionally got a recipe from someone and, if she could master it, made it a lot. We had a lot of pizzas from a box--there was a crust mix, some tomato paste, and powdered cheese. Yum. We ate Mexican food out quite often. To this day, she considers any spice beyond salt and pepper a waste. My mother's talents lie in other areas: she's a gifted seamstress, a fabulous decorator, and a real people person.

    Both my brother and I grew up to be fabulous cooks--just the will to survive, I guess. I actually took over the cooking and shopping in junior high because my mother hated it so much. What's funny is that I don't remember where I found recipes for the things I did cook, because it sure wasn't from a cookbook! I did learn some things from my grandmother, who was a wonderful, intuitive cook. She died when I was 17. I would give anything to stand beside her in a kitchen as an adult and share that experience with her.
    Okay...it's time to pull up your big-girl panties and get on with it. (Seen on a bathroom wall.)

    Visit my blogs: Cooking the Books

    For recipes only, visit the companion blog: Cooked Up.

  11. #11
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    Originally posted by Canice
    Is that because cooking was passed on mother to daughter or because.....?
    I was an adult before I found out my mother hated to cook. My parents were born in the '20s and ate simply (I don't recall any cookbooks around either). My mom had three kids and both parents worked full time. My mother usually went to make her own mother dinner after work before fixing dinner for the family and we always had the classic meat or chicken, starch, one green, one yellow vegetable. I look back on it, and that's a LOT for one person, and one who hated to cook, at that!
    Yes - my mother worked full time and put a full homecaked meal on the table every night -- albeit very basic recipes. I am certainly showing my age when I write that I remember when TV dinners came out -- my mother must have been SO relieved that my brother and I LOVED them.

    When my mother retired, she started to become more of a gourmet cook but she never enjoyed everyday cooking - she really loved baking -- I think it was the foiled scientist in her She also had the patience to make sure all the layers of a Sacher torte were split evenly.

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