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Thread: What to sub for cooking sherry--advice?

  1. #1
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    Mar 2005
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    What to sub for cooking sherry--advice?

    Is there a suitable sub for sherry in a casserole? I am thinking about making the chicken broccoli casserole CL lightened a few months ago for a reader. It calls for 1/4 cup so I don't feel like I can just leave it out. I could probably figure this out if I had ever actually tasted sherry...

    Also, is there a difference between "cooking sherry" and regular sherry? Or is it like wine, where you don't cook with anything you wouldn't drink?

  2. #2
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    It's just like wine -- definitely don't use cooking sherry as it's horrible quality as well as salty. I believe it might have something to do with liquor laws as it can be sold where liquor/wine isn't permitted because it's undrinkable.

    That said, is there a reason you don't want to use it? Sherry is like vermouth in that it lasts pretty indefinitely in your pantry so you can buy a bottle and use it until it's all gone unlike regular wine which needs to be used quickly. I get sherry from TJ and it's not expensive. I use it in lots of dishes even when it's not suggested -- sauted mushrooms, stir fries etc.

    You can sub chicken broth of course but sherry does add a nice undertone to any dish and (at least IMO) is absolutely critical to Chinese cooking.

  3. #3
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    Cooking sherry

    Quote Originally Posted by tiffanic
    Is there a suitable sub for sherry in a casserole? I am thinking about making the chicken broccoli casserole CL lightened a few months ago for a reader. It calls for 1/4 cup so I don't feel like I can just leave it out. I could probably figure this out if I had ever actually tasted sherry...

    Also, is there a difference between "cooking sherry" and regular sherry? Or is it like wine, where you don't cook with anything you wouldn't drink?

    There is a big difference between cooking sherry and dry sherry. There's way too much salt in cooking sherry. If you don't want to use dry sherry, use dry vermouth instead. I like them both but I've grown up with them in my food.

    Suz

  4. #4

    Smile Try white wine instead

    Cooking sherry is way too salty for a recipe, in my opinion. When I don't have sherry around, I've tried using white wine. It gives a nice undertone, as well. Vermouth works, too. Hope this helps!

    Cathy

  5. #5
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    May 2002
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    Arlington, WA
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    I would sub dry/ cocktail sherry, not cream sherry. domestic brands are maybe $4 a bottle & like others have pointed out will last forever. second choice, I'd use dry white wine, nothing fancy just drinkable. if alcohol is the issue I'd use chicken broth or water.
    "If the world were a logical place, men would ride side saddle." Rita Mae Brown

  6. #6
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    Mar 2005
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    West Michigan
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    Thanks everyone for the quick responses!

    I appears it is something I should keep on hand so I will put it on my grocery list for today. Heres my next question--how is port different from sherry? I do have a nice bottle of port in the cupboard.

  7. #7
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    Nov 2004
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    Ohio
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    Cook's Thesarus lists Port as a substitute for Sherry. I have never used Port as I use Dry Sherry, but I think it would work just as well, unless it is a very expensive drinking port then I don't know.

  8. #8
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    Port as a sub for sherry -- I don't think so -- at least in my non-expert opinion.

    Sherry is a light not particularly sweet wine. Port is a sweet red wine. The dishes I've used port in are hearty beef type dishes -- sauces for filet mignon, stews etc. The flavor was much more assertive than sherry -- unless we are talking cream sherry which I've never used for cooking.

    I can't imagine port in a CHinese stir fry or most of the other dishes I use sherry for. Conversely, for those dishes which specified Port, I couldn't imagine subbing sherry -- maybe a robust red sweetish red wine -- Merlot?

    It's so cheap and lasts forever (so does Port) that I can't imagine why a well stocked kitchen wouldn't keep a bottle around anyway.

  9. #9
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    Nov 2001
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    pembroke mass
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    I would substitute vermouth(first) or dry white wine(second).Don't ever use cooking sherry it's awful.I read somewhere that if you won't drink it then don't cook with it.I think ,IMHO, that sherry has such a distinctive taste that if possible try to use it (it's cheap and worth it)

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