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Thread: Anybody ever Cook a Turkey in an Oven Bag?

  1. #1
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    Anybody ever Cook a Turkey in an Oven Bag?

    Okay I managed to dodge my way out of making a turkey for Thanksgiving but now with christmas coming up I need to cook one to serve alonside with Ham. Alot of the women I work with sware by baking a Turkey in the bag. I have never made my own Turkey, I'm intimidated by it and I can't screw up either. So would you say cooking it in the bag works well?
    I love cooking with wine sometimes I even put it in the food.

  2. #2
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    I used the bags many times and they work very well.
    Well-behaved women seldom make history!

  3. #3
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    The bag method works great, but I did have a problem with the bag sticking to my turkey at Thanksgiving. That was a one time thing and I'm not sure what I did wrong. It wasn't a big deal, the bird's right breast was bare, but I don't eat the skin anyway

  4. #4
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    I always cook my turkeys in the Reynold Turkey Bags found in the isle along side the aluminum foil and plastic wraps. Just follow the instruction included with the bags and your turkey should come out fine.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by UnGourmetGal
    The bag method works great, but I did have a problem with the bag sticking to my turkey at Thanksgiving. That was a one time thing and I'm not sure what I did wrong. It wasn't a big deal, the bird's right breast was bare, but I don't eat the skin anyway
    I also use the Reynolds cooking bags and love them. Not sure if this is what my mom taught me, or if it's in the instructions, but put a little flour in the bag and shake it to coat before putting your turkey in; it should help the sticking problem.
    Everyone needs to believe in something. I believe I'll have another beer. . .

  6. #6
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    The flour thing is in the instructions. Do that and it shouldn't stick. I have only cooked turkeys using the bags. They work great, it's next to impossible to have a dry turkey using those. and they shorten the cooking time too. Good luck!

  7. #7
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    There is a downside to the bag method although I've used it before too. Because the turkey is in a bag you don't get concentrated liquid and browned bits on the bottom of the pan for gravy. the liquid that accumulates in the bag is not very good. Other than that, the turkey itself cooks fine.
    I've done the martha stewart cheesecloth method the last few years, and like it better. I'm not a gravy fan but our guests are so this works better for us. Just a thought.
    "If the world were a logical place, men would ride side saddle." Rita Mae Brown

  8. #8
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    I alway use the Reynolds bag for my turkeys. The meat is alwasy juicy, never dry and the cooking time is shorter. Use the flour as directed, and it will never stick. I agree that the gravey is not as good, but the moist turkey is more important for me. I doctor the gravey.

  9. #9
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    To be honest I was afraid to ask this question because I thought not many people use the bag method to cook a turkey!
    Okay thank you for the pointers and since I'm not a gravy fan myself I'll see what I can do with what the bag has in store for me Thanks again everyone!
    I love cooking with wine sometimes I even put it in the food.

  10. #10

    Voice of dissent.........

    We go to step mom in law's every year for Thanksgiving. All the food is wonderful as it's a potluck dinner. However, I finally got them to stop using those bags. To me the turkey just tastes like steamed turkey. Not much browning going on and not a lot of flavor IMO. Now we do one fried and one bbq'd.
    The cheesecloth method, which I learned as a child from my grandfather, is awesome. As are deep fried or cooked on bbq using indirect method.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hammster
    We go to step mom in law's every year for Thanksgiving. All the food is wonderful as it's a potluck dinner. However, I finally got them to stop using those bags. To me the turkey just tastes like steamed turkey. Not much browning going on and not a lot of flavor IMO. Now we do one fried and one bbq'd.
    The cheesecloth method, which I learned as a child from my grandfather, is awesome. As are deep fried or cooked on bbq using indirect method.

    Please share! what is the "cheesecloth method"?

  12. #12
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    I second the cheesecloth method por favor

    Pat
    I love cooking with wine sometimes I even put it in the food.

  13. #13

    Thumbs up Cheesecloth method.............

    And this really is a method and not a recipe. I don't know if this is Martha's method, but it was the way my grandfather did it.
    Well here goes. I keep it simple with s/p and garlic. But feel free to go nuts with the seasonings.
    I melt a bunch of butter and put in some chopped garlic to make some garlic butter. Don't ask quantities cause I don't really pay attention. Just whatever seems right for the size of bird.
    Ok, I season under the skin with salt, pepper, more garlic and butter.
    I then lay a double layer of cheesecloth over the breast of the turkey. Turkey must be breast side up and remain so for the duration. Mine will also sit on a rack in the roasting pan.
    I then saturate the cheesecloth with the garlic butter.
    Bird goes in the oven at 325 degrees F for ~15 - 20 mins per pound. Always use a meat thermometer to ensure bird is properly cooked. Oven temp and time are just guidelines. Meat thermometer is final authority as to when everything is done.
    After the first half hour baste the bird with more of the garlic butter. Do this every so often, 20 - 30, mins until the garlic butter is used up. Then use your turkey baster to baste with the pan drippings.
    I have left the cheesecloth on the entire time and the breast seems to brown with it on. If it's not browning, just remove the cheesecloth near the end of cooking.
    Then the usual take it out of the oven, cover and let rest for a while before carving.
    There will be lots of yummy pan juices for gravy making too.
    Enjoy.

  14. #14
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    My secret for really crispy turkey skin is mayonnaise. Straight from the jar, slathered on, then salt and pepper and something like Emeril's turkey rub sprinkled on.

    Roast 325, no basting, until thermometer says done.

    It gives a really golden brown crispy skin and the turkey seems to cook faster.

  15. #15
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    If you are intimidated by cooking a turkey, I would definitely recommend the Reynold's cooking bags. Then next year or the year after, when you have gained a little turkey confidence, move up to brining or cheesecloth or whatever method interests you. I personally love the brining, but I'm debating what I have time for this year.
    Grab the guns. I'll make pancakes. ~Sarah Conner

  16. #16
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    The thing to be careful of with the cheesecloth is make sure it's cotton cheesecloth, not synthetic. If it's in the cooking section it's probably cotton. (you could get nylon coated turkey!) the Martha method I use is a stick of melted butter & 2 cups dry white wine. then same thing, soak the cheescloth in the white wine-butter mixture & then like Hammster said. It's easy & I agree it tastes more "roasted" than the bag method. But everyone always ate both approaches without complaint. Cleanup is a little easier with the bag method but the gravy is more challenging.
    "If the world were a logical place, men would ride side saddle." Rita Mae Brown

  17. #17
    My mother-in-law has always used the Reynolds bags to roast turkeys. Her turkeys always turn out moist and delicious, and they brown well, too. She makes her gravy ahead of time. I wouldn't hesitate to use one of the roasting bogs - you can't go wrong with them!

  18. #18
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    You know I have heard that even in a bag the Turkey gets brown...hmm..
    Okay now with the cheesecloth method it sounds easier then it did previously. So then dumb question...The cheesecloth comes right off the turkey? It almost sounds like it would stick to it and peel off some of the skin when you remove it. I am willing to try it though!
    I love cooking with wine sometimes I even put it in the food.

  19. #19
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    No, the cheesecloth doesn't stick at all. it gets quite brown & almost looks edible itself.
    "If the world were a logical place, men would ride side saddle." Rita Mae Brown

  20. #20
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    If you end up making the cooking bag turkey, make sure to sprinkle the turkey with paprika. It helps the browning.
    Grab the guns. I'll make pancakes. ~Sarah Conner

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