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Thread: Transporting cheesecake?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
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    Transporting cheesecake?

    I've promised a co-worker a cheesecake for his birthday next month (this one: http://asymmetry2.com/cooking/raspbe...eesecake.html). I have an hour commute and am not sure if I should use a cooler?

    And while I'm thinking of it, can anyone recommend a good sturdy brand of cake keeper/transporter?

    Thanks!!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
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    I can't get your link to work...but I would carry it in a cooler. There is that Bundt cake carrier that would be sturdy enough for transporting.
    Well-behaved women seldom make history!

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Here's a picture of the carrier and it sells for about $20:

    Well-behaved women seldom make history!

  4. #4

    Use your trunk

    A cooler - in the winter - in Massachusetts? Heck no. That's what trunks are for! Rubbermaid & Tupperware make sturdy cake carriers. I'd just put the container inside a cardboard box (or cooler, but no ice) - use towels to stabilize it if the box is bigger than container & fix it so it won't slide around the trunk. It will be plenty cool. Your co-worker is very lucky.
    Dorothy aka Martha

    Somewhere over the rainbow...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
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    Kenmore NY, near Buffalo
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    I have to second that tupperware idea-- I bought a cheap Sterlite cake keeper to get me through (someone didn't return my Tupp!) and it just doesn't seal tight. Tupp always does, and I'm not just saying that because I used to sell it! I like to put keeper on the back seat car floor, on a towel, wedged so it can't move.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Happy Valley, OR
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    166
    I made a cheesecake for Christmas for my father-in-law. We had a 6 hour drive from Chicago to Detroit. I made the cake ahead, left it in the pan, froze it, and then just before we left pulled the frozen cake out of the freezer and put it in the trunk. It arrived in perfect condition. I think the key is leaving it in the pan. When it came out of the oven and was done cooling, I ran a knife around it so that it would come out, and it did.

    If you want it on a nice cake plate, just take the plate with you and un-mold the cake when you get to work.

    Good luck!

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by dorothyntototoo
    A cooler - in the winter - in Massachusetts? Heck no. That's what trunks are for!
    LOL. I never thought of that - I always crank the heat in the car, I forget it doesn't heat the whole thing.

    Thanks for the advice (and the kindness) everyone!

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by dorothyntototoo
    A cooler - in the winter - in Massachusetts? Heck no. That's what trunks are for!
    Well, I didn't check her location and I don't drive a vehicle with a trunk!
    Well-behaved women seldom make history!

  9. #9
    There are some advantages to living someplace where you freze your a** off in the winter.
    Dorothy aka Martha

    Somewhere over the rainbow...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    way "upstate New York"
    Posts
    594
    Transported a cheese cake in a golfcart over the holidays.
    I put the ring around it so the shaking didn't bounce off the crust and it also made me able to cover it with saran wrap without destroying the strawberry topping.

  11. #11
    I think Jennifer makes a good point about keeping it in the springform pan until you've arrived at your location. The pan will help protect it better than any carrier and you won't have to buy that something else we never have space for anyway. Just cover it with plastic wrap after it cools so your cheesecake doesn't 'sweat' and place it on your platter when you're ready. You may want to freeze it prior to your drive-not because of food safety issues, but when you go to transfer the cake onto your dish, you want it to be firm enough to lifted and moved in one piece. Good Luck!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Ridgewood, NJ
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    525

    To Sneezles

    Quote Originally Posted by sneezles
    I can't get your link to work...but I would carry it in a cooler. There is that Bundt cake carrier that would be sturdy enough for transporting.
    I couldn't either. You have to go on the main Asymmetry site and then click on link for cooking on the right hand side of the home page. There are a lot of good recipes there.

    Suz

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by skupe123
    There are a lot of good recipes there.
    Why, thank you! I haven't updated it in forever. Must have entered the text wrong in my first post, there's an extra parentheses at the end of it. Let me try again:

    Double-Decker Raspberry White Chocolate Cheesecake

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