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Thread: Substitute for chipotle chilies in adobo?

  1. #1

    Substitute for chipotle chilies in adobo?

    I have a couple of recipes that call for this ingredient, I've searched far and wide in my grocery store and they do not have it (we're pretty northern so I don't know if its worthwhile searching other stores)

    What can I substitute? I have the following available:

    -Pickled jalepenos
    -Fresh jalepenos
    -Green Chilies
    -Fresh red chillies
    -Chipotle salsa (which my store does have)

    Appreciate your help

  2. #2

    Exclamation The salsa....

    As it's a combo of heat and smokiness that the Chipotles provide, I'd use the Chipotle salsa. You might want to drain the salsa through some cheesecloth or other filter media (fine mesh strainer would work too) to get rid of most of the water.

    On a side note. Your grocery stores don't have an Hispanic foods aisle (section)? That's the first place I find Chipotles in Adobo when I buy mine. But I'm in San Diego.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Ridgewood, NJ
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    525

    Dried chipotles

    You may be able to get them dried if you can't find them in the sauce. Otherwise I'd get the chipotle salsa. The regular jalapenos won't have the wonderful smokiness that the chipotles have. I actually like the dried ones better. Just stick them in some warm water until they reconstitute or if you are throwing them in spaghetti sauce or chili, just throw them in dried and they'll soften up in the other liquid.

    Oh, just make sure to take them out before you serve the food so some unsuspecting guest doesn't eat it. They are great but not a whole mouthful full.

    Suz

  4. #4
    Your grocery stores don't have an Hispanic foods aisle (section)?
    Nope - a tiny corner that has very basic Mexican foods - taco shells & seasonings, that kind of thing - basically anything to make tacos, fajitas or quesidillas. But they don't have the chipotles. I'm in Canada, so Hispanic food isn't as huge here as it is in the states

    Thanks, I'll buy the chilli

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Ohio
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    396
    I have a bottle of dried chipotle chile powder that I find in my spice aisle that I sometimes substitute out when I don't have a canned chipotle available, I agree the smokey quality will be lacking, and the powder still gives me this when I use it.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
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    72
    In a real pinch, I've used a combination of smoked paprika (for the smoky flavor) and a bit of cayenne for the heat. I'd use a 1/2 tsp. of the smoked paprika and just a dash of cayenne and add more to taste.

    By the way, the smoked paprika works wonders for adding smoky taste to vegetarian version of dishes that originally called for bacon or something similar.

    -Stacey

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by DCook
    Nope - a tiny corner that has very basic Mexican foods - taco shells & seasonings, that kind of thing - basically anything to make tacos, fajitas or quesidillas. But they don't have the chipotles. I'm in Canada, so Hispanic food isn't as huge here as it is in the states

    Thanks, I'll buy the chilli
    If you can find the dried chilis in your area, the internet has Adobo sauce recipes. I imagine you could make your own chipotles in adobo. (They freeze well also)
    I thought about the chipotle salsa, and putting it into the food processor or blender might give it a nice sauce like consistency to use with the dried chilis as well.
    Skupe suggested throwing them in whole. You could easily mince the dried chilis and throw them in and then don't have to worry about removing the whole chili.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Un-American NY
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    8,611
    The Tabasco people are putting out a chipotle version of their hot sauce now. It's pretty widely distributed. Also chipotle powder is becoming more widely distributed by the major spice manufacturers, so a check of the spice section might produce something.

    I don't know that the salsa is going to do much. It depends on the recipe and how it can be incorporated, but you didn't tell us what that is!

    Bob

  9. #9
    I've got multiple - a baked shrimp one, various quesidillas, chicken, soups - thats why I didn't specify, because I need a general solution, not a specific one

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Texas
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    24,226
    Linda in Mo posted this recipe about 4 years ago and even though I can buy the canned I make my own now leaving out the salt. They taste exactly like the canned and freeze just as nicely.
    Chipotle salsa is good but heavy on tomatoes but if your recipes call for tomatoes it would be a good sub. Chipotle tabasco and powder would not have the vinegar that canned ones have.
    Give the recipe a try it's very easy. I buy my dried chipotles from Penzey's though on occasion I can find them in the store.

    Chipotles in Adobo Sauce

    "Chipotles in adobo are chipotles that have been stewed in a lightly seasoned liquid. They have become very popular in Southwestern cooking because the provide a distinctive warm heat and delicious smoky flavor. They can be added to almost anything, including breads, sauces, salad dressings and pastas. Although you can buy canned chipotles in adobo (look for them in markets that specialize in Hispanic foods), this homemade alternative is far superior and is very easy to prepare."

    7 to 10 medium-sized dried chipotle chilies -- stemmed and slit lengthwise
    1/3 cup Onion -- 1/2-inch slices
    5 tablespoons Cider vinegar
    2 Cloves garlic -- sliced
    4 tablespoons Ketchup (I use Muir Glen or homemade)
    1/4 teaspoon Salt (I don't use these days)

    Combine all of the ingredients in a pan with 3 cups of water. Cover and cook over very low heat for 1 to 1 1/2 hours, until the chilies are very soft and the liquid has been reduced to 1 cup. This recipe will keep for several weeks in the refrigerator in an airtight container.

    For chipotle puree, place the cooked chipotles and sauce in a blender and puree. Put through a fine sieve to remove seeds.
    Makes 1 cup.

    Per Tablespoon: 9 calories, .3 gm protein, 3 gm carbohydrates, 0 gm fat, 0 gm saturated fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 73 mg sodium.

    From "The Great Chile Book" by Mark Miller
    Well-behaved women seldom make history!

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by bobmark226
    The Tabasco people are putting out a chipotle version of their hot sauce now. It's pretty widely distributed. Also chipotle powder is becoming more widely distributed by the major spice manufacturers, so a check of the spice section might produce something.
    Bob
    I completely forgot about the Chipotle Tabasco and I have some in my kitchen at home. That would be the perfect addition!!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    19,699
    I would just buy them online or ask someone to drop a can in the mail to me.

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