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Thread: Sherry vs White White

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2001
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    Western Colorado
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    Post Sherry vs White White

    Can white wine be substituted for sherry in recipes?

    When a recipe calls for sherry - what kind of sherry do you use? I am not that fond of the sherry that I have cooked with but I don't know if it is becuase I don't like the taste of sherry or if it is because I was talked into the $2.00 bottle of sherry at the liquor store.

    Thanks in adavnce!


  2. #2
    Join Date
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    I substitute sherry for white wine, and vice versa, all the time. Generally, when a recipe calls for sherry, it's referring to the dry, pale-colored kind. I think mine was about $5 for the bottle, and I'm nearly finished using it. I love it in stir-fry sauces and risottos. Anyway, yes, you should be able to use them interchangebly in many things, but if a recipe calls for a sweet white wine rather than dry, I might think twice about it.

  3. #3

    Talking

    You might want to try a slightly better brand of sherry. As your liquor purveyor to recommend a decent brand. I always find it helpful to use automotive equivalents for what I'm looking for - i.e. ask for the "Toyota" of sherries instead of the "Yugo"

  4. #4

    Cool

    I think you've got to play around and see what works for you. Personally, I would be far more inclined to use vermouth instead of white wine than I would to sub sherry, but you may find the resulting taste works for you. Other than one recipe which comes to mind, I tend to cook with pretty dry whites, as a rule, and to my taste buds, the sherry just doesn't cut it. But, we are all different, so try it some time and see what you think. As Emily states, you're looking for something marked "dry" sherry, so don't even look at anything marked "cream." Some of the real cheapie so-called "cooking sherries" are ghastly, so you might want to upgrade your stock a bit.

    Sherry is pretty versatile and it keeps a long, long time, so not to worry if it sits on the shelf for a long time. I use it in some Chinese stir-fries (often as part of a marinade) and also in some of my Cuban dishes.

  5. #5
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    If you are near a Trader Joe's you might want to check out their Sherry. I usually by the driest for cooking. No, I don't care to drink it either. Actually, any white wine will do if you don't have Sherry.

  6. #6
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    Gail - I think that was my problem. I was steered towards cooking sherry and that is ghastly-you are right! Curleytop - I wish we had a trader joes! We don't even have a williams sonoma in a 300 mile radius! Yikes!

    Gail - what would you pay for a decent bottle of dry sherry you would cook with?

    Thanks for all your help!!!!

  7. #7

    Cool

    Gosh, being spread out all over the country our markets carry different brands at different rates. Ask Natasha about the man we encountered in the wine section of the Piggly Wiggly in Birmingham talking about the difference in wine costs between Florida and Birmingham...

    I kind of like Sandeman, which I seem to recall being like $8.00 a bottle. Really, the price range is incredible. Emily said she found some decent sherry in the $5.00 range. Knowing absolutely zilch about sherry, I simply went for something which appeared more or less middle of the road. I'd say steer away from El Cheapo and you'll probably be fine.

    ---

    Came back to revise this and my computer weirded out. Here's a bit of information from good ol' Cook's Thesaurus. I learned something: (1) my sherry is the Amontillado type and (2) it doesn't have quite the shelf life I thought!

    sherry = sack Notes: This fortified Spanish wine is typically served in small glasses before dinner, but many cooks also keep a bottle handy in the kitchen to perk up sauces, soups, and desserts. There are two categories of sherry: fino and oloroso. Fino sherry = Palma sherry is dry, fruity, and expensive. Examples of fino include the exquisite Manzanilla and the potent and nutty Amontillado. Oloroso sherry is more heavily fortified than fino. Examples include Amoroso and cream sherry, both of which are sweetened and especially popular in Britain. Once bottled, sherry doesn't age well, so you should plan to use it no more than a year or two after you buy it. Once opened, fino sherries should be consumed within a few days and stored in the refrigerator. Oloroso sherries can be stored a bit longer, say a week. Cooking sherry usually has added salt, and is shunned by more experienced cooks. Substitutes: Port OR Madeira OR Mirin OR red wine + 1 teaspoon sugar (per cup of wine) OR white wine (for cream soups and sauces, poultry, or game) OR dry vermouth (for cream soups and sauces, fish, or poultry) OR muscatel (for desserts, fruits, baked ham) OR vanilla extract (use much less) OR coffee (when making baked goods with chocolate or nuts) OR fruit juice (when making baked goods with fruit)



    [This message has been edited by Gail (edited 06-26-2001).]

  8. #8
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    susiking: I know you are not near TJ, but this is a guideline. This one is called EXTRA PALE DRY SHERRY, by A. Soler, Produce of Spain and cost $3.99 for 750ml.

  9. #9
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    Gail - Wow. That is really interesting! The shelf life isn't too long at all! I can go to bed now - I learned my one thing for the day! Thanks for the info!

  10. #10
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    Could this thread be any more timely? I'm just laughing at the coincidence. I have never used cream sherry in cooking until tonight- I'm right in the midst of preparing a CL Complete grilled salmon recipe that called for cream sherry. I was tempted to just use white wine, but was concerned that the sweetness found in cream sherry wouldn't come through in the white wine, so I forked out the $6 for sherry at Safeway.

    I'll let you know how it turns out!!

    [This message has been edited by KValley (edited 06-26-2001).]

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