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Thread: Soup serving sizes

  1. #1
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    Soup serving sizes

    What serving size of soup would you consider an entree? Over one cup, over 1 1/2 cups? What kind of soup would you think of as an entree vs a side dish?

    Just curious......
    *Susan*

    "One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries."

    A.A. Milne

  2. #2
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    For me, a cup would definitely be a side, no matter what type it was. Now if all i'm having is soup for dinner with some crusty bread, it probably would depend on the soup as to when I was full. Something lighter like French Onion that is more broth than substance I would think I could eat a couple of cups+ for sure! Cream soups, chili, those types that are more filling, maybe a little less. But I love soup, so....
    Everyone needs to believe in something. I believe I'll have another beer. . .

  3. #3
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    For me it would not only depend on the heartiness of the soup, but on the sides. If you're having a big salad and some bread with the soup, you can get away with less. If the soup is the main attraction, with just some bread on the side, you need more. Also, for a soup to qualify as entree for me, it needs to have some significant protein and vegetables, esp. with few or no sides. For something like tomato soup, I would consider that a co-entree with a sandwich or a salad that had some protein. For chicken noodle with a high stuff-to-broth ratio, that stands alone pretty well.

  4. #4
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    The only soups I would consider a starter-only would be very thin, brothy ones with little protein or starch; I have a roasted onion and garlic one that I think would be a nice way to start a fall meal, but rather falls short as an entrée. Pretty much anything else goes as an entrée. I agree that it really depends on how rich or starchy the soup is (and how well it's received!) but I would count on at least a cup and a half as a serving. I like to serve a crusty bread and cheese with soup and follow it up with a salad, so all that comes into play too.

  5. #5
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    I tend to think of the chowder type soups and bean or split pea types as main course while clear soups are usually sides. The noodle soups range inbetween, depending on the solid to broth ratio. Not sure what a serving would be though, in general it seems the thicker the stock or base the quicker folks are full.
    Anne

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canice
    The only soups I would consider a starter-only would be very thin, brothy ones with little protein or starch; I have a roasted onion and garlic one that I think would be a nice way to start a fall meal, but rather falls short as an entrée.

    Canice, would you mind posting this recipe?
    Everyone needs to believe in something. I believe I'll have another beer. . .

  7. #7
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    NP, Pamela! I'll also post a cheddar cheese and leek soup that's a nice starter, though richer.

    Roast Onion and Garlic Soup

    4 white onions
    4 garlic cloves
    1 tbsp. olive oil
    4 rashers streaky bacon
    1 litre chicken stock
    1/2 tsp. ground cumin
    pinch of ground nutmeg
    sea salt
    freshly ground black pepper
    2 tbsp. whipping cream
    1 tsp. thyme leaves

    Heat the oven to 200C/Gas mark 6 (375F?). Peel the onions and cut a deep cross about halfway through each one. Arrange in a roasting tray with the unpeeled garlic cloves. Drizzle with olive oil and toss well, then bake for one hour, until soft. Arrange the bacon on top for the last ten or fifteen minutes of baking, then set the crisped bacon aside.

    Remove the onion skins and place the flesh in a saucepan, freeing the onion leaves from each other. Squeeze the garlic cloves, adding the softened garlic to the onions and discarding the skins.

    Add chicken stock, cumin, nutmeg, sea salt and pepper, and bring to the boil, stirring. Reduce the heat and let simmer for 15 minutes. Transfer to a food processor and whizz to a purée. Return the soup to the pan and reheat.

    Whisk the cream to a soft peak and crumble the bacon into shards.

    Ladle the soup into four warmed soup bowls, top with a dollop of whipped cream and scatter with crumbled bacon and thyme leaves.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canice
    I have a roasted onion and garlic one that I think would be a nice way to start a fall meal.
    I second the request for this one if it is not too much trouble. It sounds great, I love roasted garlic anything!
    Ana

  9. #9
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    Oops... You are fast!! It was not posted when I opened the thread... Thanks Canice!!
    Ana

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canice
    NP, Pamela! I'll also post a cheddar cheese and leek soup that's a nice starter, though richer.
    Thank you!! Interesting recipe. (Never heard of streaky bacon) I'd love the cheddar leek soup recipe! I have broccoli cheese soup on the menu this week, but DH is not too hip on broc - but he'd like the leeks!!
    Everyone needs to believe in something. I believe I'll have another beer. . .

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by PAMMELA
    Thank you!! Interesting recipe. (Never heard of streaky bacon) I'd love the cheddar leek soup recipe! I have broccoli cheese soup on the menu this week, but DH is not too hip on broc - but he'd like the leeks!!
    Streaky bacon is regular bacon to us. In England I know they have streaky bacon and back bacon, which we often know as Canadian bacon.
    "Is ice hockey hard? I don't know, you tell me. We need to have the strength and power of a football player, the stamina of a marathon runner and the concentration of a brain surgeon. But, we need to put all this together while moving at high speeds on a cold and slippery surface while 5 other guys use clubs to try and kill us. Oh, yeah, did I mention that this whole time we're standing on blades 1/8 of an inch thick. Is ice hockey hard? I don't know, you tell me. Next question."

  12. #12
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    Wow, I'd forgotten how dairy-laden this one is! No wonder I liked it

    White Cheddar Cheese Leek Soup

    3 small leeks
    1 stick butter
    3 ribs celery, diced
    1 carrot, peeled and diced
    1 tsp. minced garlic
    salt and ground black pepper, to taste
    1/4 cup flour
    4 cups chicken stock, divided
    1 cup heavy cream
    1/2 lb. white Cheddar cheese , shredded, PLUS
    1/4 cup for garnish
    1/2 tsp. to 1 tsp. hot pepper sauce (optional)
    1/4 cup chopped crisp bacon
    2 Tbsp. chopped chives
    whole chives
    Loaf of crusty bread

    Cut off and discard the tough green part of the leeks. Cut white part of leeks in half lengthwise and rinse well. Cut into small dice.

    In a large skillet, melt the butter. Sauté vegetables 3 minutes or until wilted. Stir in garlic and season mixture with salt and pepper. Dust vegetables with flour and stir 3 minutes. Whisk in chicken stock, ½ cup at a time. Bring liquid to boil and reduce to simmer. Simmer soup 45 minutes. Remove from heat and purée until smooth. Strain soup into clean saucepan.

    Bring soup to a simmer. Whisk in cream, ½ pound cheese, hot pepper sauce if desired, and Worcestershire sauce. Taste and reseason if necessary. Ladle soup into shallow bowl. Garnish with bacon, ¼ cup cheese, the chopped chives and whole chives. Serve with crusty bread.

    Makes 4-6 servings

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