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Thread: Canning in the dishwasher???????

  1. #1

    Canning in the dishwasher???????

    I have a friend who told me recently that she 'cans' her pickles in the dishwasher (and has been doing for years)! I have never heard of this, I'm sure it is a VERY easy method, but how can that be a safe way to 'can'. Has anyone ever done this?

    Elaine

  2. #2
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    Don't know about canning but years ago people cooked salmon in their dishwasher

    Needs:

    salmon fillets
    aluminum foil
    a lemon
    a few butter pats
    electric dishwasher
    Place the fish on two large sheets of aluminum foil. Squeeze on some lemon juice and place the pats of butter on the salmon fillets. Seal the fillets well in the foil, and place the foil packet in the top wire basket of your electric dishwasher. DO NOT ADD SOAP OR DETERGENT. Close the dishwasher door, set the dishwasher on the hottest wash cycle, complete with drying cycle, and let it run through a full cycle. When the cycle is complete the fish will be cooked just right
    Democrats are Sexy. Who has ever heard of a good piece of elephant?

  3. #3
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    In the past when I have made strawberry jam, I have used the dishwasher instead of a big pot of boiling water etc. I wash the glass jars, lids & rings in the dishwasher and make my jam at the same time. Once the jars are washed and super hot from the dishwasher just ladle the jam into them and put the lids and rings onto the jars. What ever jars that don't seal, store in the fridge. I don't think I ever had a jar that didn't seal for me.

    I would NOT try this with anything that is likely to spoil like fish etc.

    Of course, I haven't used this method since I discovered freezer jam is so much tastier and easier

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by tbb113
    Don't know about canning but years ago people cooked salmon in their dishwasher

    Needs:

    salmon fillets
    aluminum foil
    a lemon
    a few butter pats
    electric dishwasher
    Place the fish on two large sheets of aluminum foil. Squeeze on some lemon juice and place the pats of butter on the salmon fillets. Seal the fillets well in the foil, and place the foil packet in the top wire basket of your electric dishwasher. DO NOT ADD SOAP OR DETERGENT. Close the dishwasher door, set the dishwasher on the hottest wash cycle, complete with drying cycle, and let it run through a full cycle. When the cycle is complete the fish will be cooked just right
    This cracks me up. I can just imagine being at a dinner party and complimenting the host on what a delicious salmon we are enjoying for dinner and then asking for the recipe....ha ha ha

  5. #5
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    Canning In The Dishwasher

    I Never Heard Of That Before, But Sounds Reasonable For Something That Will Seal Rather Quickly. I Will Try That Next Year, As My Garden Is Now At The Every End.
    Val.

  6. #6
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    Originally Posted by tbb113
    Don't know about canning but years ago people cooked salmon in their dishwasher
    <snip>
    Close the dishwasher door,set the dishwasher on the hottest wash cycle, complete with drying cycle, and let it run through a full cycle. When the cycle is complete the fish will be cooked just right
    A complete dishwasher cycle using the hottest water -- so it takes an hour or so to cook a piece of salmon that could be cooked for 10 or so minutes otherwise without wasting water or energy for heating said water... :mad:
    Galinda didn't often stop to consider whether she believed in what she said or not; the whole point of conversation was flow. -- Gregory Maguire: Wicked
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  7. #7
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    I did a quick search & couldn't find any University of Anywhere Extension ffice (checked WI,MN & MO) that recommends dishwasher canning. Looks fine to sterilize & pre-heat the jars in the dishwasher, but they still require processing in a canner to make them safe for dry storage.
    Is your friend making fresh pickles that are jarred & stored in the fridge??

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by tbb113
    Don't know about canning but years ago people cooked salmon in their dishwasher

    Needs:

    salmon fillets
    aluminum foil
    a lemon
    a few butter pats
    electric dishwasher
    Place the fish on two large sheets of aluminum foil. Squeeze on some lemon juice and place the pats of butter on the salmon fillets. Seal the fillets well in the foil, and place the foil packet in the top wire basket of your electric dishwasher. DO NOT ADD SOAP OR DETERGENT. Close the dishwasher door, set the dishwasher on the hottest wash cycle, complete with drying cycle, and let it run through a full cycle. When the cycle is complete the fish will be cooked just right
    Duh.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by mayre
    I did a quick search & couldn't find any University of Anywhere Extension ffice (checked WI,MN & MO) that recommends dishwasher canning. Looks fine to sterilize & pre-heat the jars in the dishwasher, but they still require processing in a canner to make them safe for dry storage.
    Is your friend making fresh pickles that are jarred & stored in the fridge??
    I doubt any reputable extension agent would recomend the dishwasher method as opposed to the hot water bath. Like I said, I only did it for strawberry jam which contains so much sugar that if it didn't seal properly could be stored in a refrigerator. Also the hot jars could be filled quickly since the jam was already made. I wonder if your friend filled the pickle jars and then just "washed" everything in order to can them???

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by birdyone
    I have a friend who told me recently that she 'cans' her pickles in the dishwasher (and has been doing for years)! I have never heard of this, I'm sure it is a VERY easy method, but how can that be a safe way to 'can'. Has anyone ever done this?

    Elaine
    Elaine, she may do it, but I would not.

    Do you use a dishwasher to can foods?

    Unsafe. Using your dishwasher to processing canned foods is dangerous. The temperature of the water during the cleaning and rinsing cycle is far below that required to kill harmful microoganisms. Thus the product will be under processed and unsafe to eat. The only safe procedures for canning are boiling water bath process for HIGH acid foods and pressure canning for low-acid foods
    http://missvickie.com/canning/quiz.htm

  11. #11
    Thanks everyone! Apparently what she does is wash the jars in the d/w, cooks the brine on the stove, puts the pickles/whatever in the jar, pours the brine in - and - puts back in the d/w with lids on, but not tight - when the cycle (and I'm thinking she said only a 'rinse' cycle ) is finished, takes out the jars, tightens the lids - and she said they all seal perfectly? I was actually shocked when she told me this - said she read it in a magazine years ago and has been doing so ever since. I 'think' they end up in a fridge in the basement for whenever.

    I would be terrified of botulism - but just wanted to know if anyone had ever done this - in a perfect world this would be great, however, it ain't perfect!

    I must remember to throw them out when I get my yearly jar rather than eat them as I had been doing before I was told how she canned them!

    Elaine

  12. #12
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    The funny thing is, I can't see how doing it a dishwasher is easier than a water bath. It's certainly more wasteful in terms of water and energy use.

  13. #13
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    I make a pepper/cucumber relish that doesn't require being put in a hot water bath as long as the jars are filled hot and the relish is hot when you put it into them and then they will seal when they cool. I would say this method is for similar recipes, but not for those that need to cook the ingredients inside.
    I wear my toolbelt in the kitchen...

  14. #14
    Good point! In retrospect, I suppose this method my friend uses is ok - being that the brine comes to a boil and the other ingredients are cucumbers and onions - what do you think?

  15. #15
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    Personally, I still think all the reputable canning resources say that you still need to process jars in boiling water or pressure canner, even if ingredients and jars are hot when they are filled. I have also read/heard of steam canners, but saw in the Ball Blue Book or somewhere that those are not safe either.

    This also reminds me of my sister. Several years ago we were staying at her house, and enjoying some homemade blackberry jam. I told her how good I thought it was, and she offered to give me several jars to take home. Her method of canning? After filling the jars, she turned them upside down for some period of time, and then right side up again, and said that it sealed the jars. Again, not safe for preservation from what I have read. I thanked her for the jars, took them home, and dumped them. I too am too afraid of contamination. I would never want to make myself or anyone else sick. Just because people used to think such practices were ok, doesn't mean that it hasn't since been proven that those practices aren't ok. I'll stick to my boiling water canner thank you! Don't want to offend anyone if you do this, but I just don't think it's safe from what I've read.
    Cheryl-If I was organized, I'd be dangerous.

  16. #16
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    From homecanning.com (Ball corporation doesn't make the home canning stuff anymore, and directs you to this web site instead)

    Home canning is not complicated. It is a simple procedure of applying heat to food in a closed jar in order to interrupt the natural decaying that would otherwise take place. It requires “processing” or “heat processing” foods according to up-to-date, tested home canning guidelines. Proper home canning includes:

    placing prepared food in Ball brand or Kerr brand home canning jars which are then sealed with Ball brand or Kerr brand two-piece vacuum caps;
    heating the filled jars to the designated temperature using the correct type of canner for the food being processed;
    processing the filled jars for the required time as stated by an up-to-date, tested recipe in order to destroy the spoilage microorganisms and inactive enzymes;
    cooling jars properly, allowing the lids to vent excess air from the jars to form a vacuum seal.
    When followed exactly, the processing methods and times of up-to-date, tested home canning recipes adequately destroy normal levels of heat-resistant microorganisms. After processing and upon cooling, a vacuum is formed and the lid seals onto the jar. This ensures that home canned foods will be free of spoilage when the jars are stored properly and remain vacuum-sealed. This seal prevents other microorganisms from entering and recontaminating the food.

    NOTE: The cooking time necessary for recipe preparation before the food is placed in the jars is not a part of the processing time. It does not alter the processing time required for safe home canned foods. To thoroughly destroy all microorganisms that may be in a specific food as it is ladled into the jars, always process the filled jars for the time specified in a tested recipe from a reliable source, such as the Ball Blue Book® of Preserving.
    Cheryl-If I was organized, I'd be dangerous.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by birdyone
    Good point! In retrospect, I suppose this method my friend uses is ok - being that the brine comes to a boil and the other ingredients are cucumbers and onions - what do you think?

    No...the cukes & onions still would have to be processed or they will spoil without refrigeration. Jam & relish work because they are pre-cooked and added while still very hot to hot jars.
    This is still an iffy practice, because any bacteria introduced into the product while filling can cause spoilage. Processing is a better way to ensure the product is sterile.

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