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Thread: Can I Make Buttermilk From Milk?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
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    North Carolina
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    Can I Make Buttermilk From Milk?

    I need one cup of buttermilk. I only have plain milk. Can I make buttermilk by adding something? Hope someone has had success with this!

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
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    IL
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    In baking, I do this often and never had a problem.

    1 cup of milk with 1 tbsp vinegar - let sit for about 5 minutes.

    edited- changed to tbsp.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
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    Texas
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    While you can't actually make buttermilk from milk (it's a by-product of making butter from cream) you can make sour milk which gives about the same reaction in baking. Place 1 tbs of vinegar in the measuring cup and then fill to the 1 cup line, stir, let sit for a minute or so and then use.
    Well-behaved women seldom make history!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
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    Northwest
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    Yes, but you will need vinegar - do you have any?

    Put 1 Tbs of vinegar in a 1c measure and fill the rest of the way with milk = buttermilk

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
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    Rensselaer, NY
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    3,014
    I use the methods described above, but using lemon juice instead of vinegar. Works great for baking!

    Kari

  6. #6
    I will often sub plain yogurt for buttermilk. It works great.

  7. #7

    Two Types of Buttermilk

    There are actually two types of buttermilk. One is called "old fashioned" and is the product of making cream, as was mentioned in an earlier post. This type of buttermilk has the consistency of milk and often has flakes of butter floating in it.

    The second type is called "cultured buttermilk" and is probably the one most of us are familiar with as being available in our local grocery stores. Cultured buttermilk is thick and sour. For a good article explaining the difference between the two types, and for information on how to make your own cultured buttermilk (i.e. not a buttermilk substitute), go to the following Web site (written by a professor of biology and chemistry): http://biology.clc.uc.edu/Fankhauser...BUTTERMILK.HTM

    Enjoy your buttermilk!

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