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Thread: How to season a new wooden rolling pin?

  1. #1
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    How to season a new wooden rolling pin?

    I got a new wooden rolling pin today and am assuming that it should be seasoned prior to using it. I am guessing that I would treat it like a wooden cutting board and oil it well before using. The new one has an 18 inch long barrel and weighs a bundle. My husband asked if I planned on keeping it under the bed to surprise burglars with. Any thoughts? I did an enquiry on google and got nothing relevant. AK

  2. #2
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    I could be doing something wrong, but I don't find the need to season my rolling pins with anything.
    Joe

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  3. #3
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    Yeah, I've not seasoned mine and I don't think I'd want to put oil on it since that would make it stick to dough more.

  4. #4
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    I think it'll season pretty quickly on its own, b/c of the fat (butter) in dough.

    When you do oil a cutting board, FYI, you don't want to use vegetable oil, as that'll eventually go rancid--use mineral oil. But I wouldn't bother seasoning a rolling pin. I imagine the flour you'll use on it would really stick to any oil that remained on the pin; could produce a lumpy mess.
    If you're afraid of butter, use cream. ~~ Julia Child

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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by testkitchen45

    When you do oil a cutting board, FYI, you don't want to use vegetable oil, as that'll eventually go rancid--use mineral oil.
    Now that is what I thought also. But I could swear that I heard RR on her show today say to use Olive Oil. Anyone see her show today? (first one I watched for more than 5 minutes) Did I hear wrong?

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by cookieee
    Now that is what I thought also. But I could swear that I heard RR on her show today say to use Olive Oil. Anyone see her show today? (first one I watched for more than 5 minutes) Did I hear wrong?
    While I don't know if you heard wrong or not olive oil should not be used to season or treat any wood kitchen utensil. Before using a new butcher block, season it to prevent staining and absorption of food odors and bacteria. Use a product that is (1) edible; and (2) tasteless. USP-grade mineral oil is a popular choice as it is the cheapest pure food-grade oil you can buy (do not use vegetable or olive oil because it can turn rancid). Mineral oil remains safe throughout its life. NOTE: Pure mineral oil can be easily found at your local drug store.

    Before applying oil to butcher block, warm the oil slightly. Apply oil with a soft cloth, in the direction of the grain, allowing the oil to soak in between each of the four or five coats required for the initial seasoning. After each treatment, wait about four to six hours and wipe off oil that did not soak into the wood (oxidation or hardening of the oil will take approximately 6 hours). Re-oil the butcher block monthly or as often as needed.

    The same method can and should be used for wooden rolling pins. I have two expensive ones and have treated both as described above.
    Well-behaved women seldom make history!

  7. #7
    I was just reading somewhere about oiling cutting boards--if you dust them thoroughly with corn starch after the oil has had a chance to penetrate, the starch will absorb all the extra oil.

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