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Thread: Wrinkled linen curtains

  1. #1

    Wrinkled linen curtains

    Hello, I am a long time lurker looking for some advice. I recently bought linen curtains and even though they were ironed they still have wrinkles. Short of getting them dry cleaned, does anyone have any tips on getting the curtains smooth? Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    5,563
    you can mix a spray of water and white vinegar. You spray it on while you're ironing. I'll try to remember to look it up the mix when I'm at home.
    Grab the guns. I'll make pancakes. ~Sarah Conner

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    7,938
    Have you tried a clothes steamer?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    2,357
    If it's linen, you really have to iron it damp to get the wrinkles out.
    Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way you cope with it is what makes the difference.

  5. #5
    I agree with everyone else, except make sure to let each area sit long enough to cool after you've finished ironing or the wrinkle is likely to return. I usually wait about ten seconds before I move to the next section.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    5,563
    Ack! I couldn't find the article I read about pressing linen, so I did an online search, and several articles said not to use vinegar! I must have gotten a couple of different things confused.

    Anyway, here's what they say about ironning linen at Silk Road, where people say the fabric is great:

    "Ironing is often optional when dried flat or tumbled at low heat. We hate to iron, but ironing linen is a great deal easier if you do it when the linen is damp. And if linen is removed from drying while still damp and ironed immediately, it is easier still. Steam ironing dry linen is less effective and requires more effort (Ugh!). If you can't get to them while they are still damp, put them in a plastic bag in the refrigerator before ironing. This will make them easier to iron and will prevent mildew.

    "Use spray starch (if desired) and iron with lots of steam at a medium-to-hot setting. Starch provides extra crispness, particularly for folded napkins.For a softer look for garments, use fabric sizing instead.

    "Iron on the wrong side first, then on the right side to bring out the sheen, especially damasks and light-colored linens. Iron dark linens on the wrong side only. Heavier fabrics may need a slightly higher temperature setting. Pure linen can withstand the highest temperature setting on your iron, but test an inconspicuous corner first.

    "Iron linen until smooth but not dry. Once wrinkles are gone, hang the linen item until it is bone dry. When ironing embroidered linen, keep the embroidery stitches rounded and dimensional by pressing item on the wrong side atop a soft towel. Use a press cloth to safeguard delicate lace and cutwork. A press cloth also helps to avoid press marks over seams, hems and pockets. Place a table next to the ironing board when ironing large tablecloths. Roll finished sections of the cloth over the table rather than letting it pile up under the ironing board. Minimize creasing ironed tablecloths by rolling them around a tube or hanging them."
    Grab the guns. I'll make pancakes. ~Sarah Conner

  7. #7

    Thanks!

    I appreciate everyone's advice! I was going to get them pressed, but it costs as much as what I paid for each panel!

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