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Thread: 17 month old is not saying ANY words...

  1. #1
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    17 month old is not saying ANY words...*with update*

    Let me preface this by saying I am a worrier by nature. I will also say that as a teacher with a Master's degree in Language and Literacy I have worked with kids who have all sorts of delays and diagnoses.

    My almost 17 month old son isn't saying any words. He says dada but not always to daddy. He communicates in terms of pointing to things and signing a few things. he babbles constantly using a variety of consonant and vowel sounds. He understands lots of words and will bring you things you ask (like a cup, shoes, socks, his lovey, his horsey, a puzzle, etc.) and brings things to us to share toys, etc. He'll give us a kiss if we ask sometimes, etc. He points to body parts we name. Just no words. Does anyone have a similar situation to share so I don't feel like I'm the only one? I'm starting to worry....

    Oh and FWIW, I did mention it at his 15 month appt and the ped said to wait. The only speech therapy right now is talking to him....
    Last edited by 615bride; 11-02-2006 at 11:45 AM.

  2. #2
    You are probably a very good mom and anticipate his needs so that he doesn't have to ask for much. I have three sons and was a fairly confused mom with the first born. He started giving me orders at 18 months basically, the third son never said anything until after he was two and then spoke in complete sentences. The middle one was somewhere in between, speaking in tongues so to say trying to keep up with the first born and eventually the language became understandable.

    They are all different.....quite annoying.....seems like at least two of them would have been alike.

    Enjoy, they grow up fast!
    "You can live a perfectly normal life if you accept the fact that your life will never be perfectly normal." -Randy Glasbergen

  3. #3
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    Late talking is not neccesarily a bad indicator. My husband did not speak at all until he was 5 and when he did he spoke in complete scentences and sounded like a ten year old. You never know.
    However, you sound very concerned, so I am sure you already have tried this, but have you had his pediatrician give him a basic hearing test? When we were fosterparenting my 20 month old DS I was concerned how nonverbal he was and everyone kept telling me not to worry. I worried so I asked his pediatrician to check him out and she basically stood behind him and tested his directional hearing. It showed some impairment so she refered him to an ENT specialist and a speach pathologist. The ENT found chronic ear infection and a cholesteotoma that required eartubes and surgery. The speach pathologist worked with us and he rapidly started speaking. I say she worked with us because she stoped me from responding to his nonverbal demands and she got his older sister to stop being his simultaneous translator. Now he is 8 doing well in 3rd grade and wears a hearing aid in one ear to school. We had such an easy time adjusting to the speach therapy because he was so young he didn't realize that it was unusual. I am so glad I didn't wait until school age to start the process. It just amazes me how many kids do have some type of hearing loss. I say check it out. What can it hurt? A few hours wasted in the doctors office?

  4. #4
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    Well it sounds like his receptive skills are good, and the fact that he babbles and can use a lot of consonant and vowel sounds is really encouraging. As you probably know, boys are later talkers by nature, and I've been told by our speech therapist that if other men in your families were late talkers, then he likely will be too.

    My son wasn't talking at 17months either. At his 18 month appointment, the ped said if not saying 6 words at the age of 2, he will be referred to speech therapist.

    He had a hearing test....which is a good first step....but they didn't find any problems with his hearing.

    At 22 months he was only saying No, Go, Uh-oh, Mom, Hi. We had a speech evaluation done by the state's Early Childhood Intervention. They determined that he had motor, social and cognitive skills all right on target but was speaking at a 15 month level. He has mild to moderate Expressive Developmental Language Disorder. He started speech therapy through them at 23 months. But then after their really good speech therapist left, we switched to a private group covered by our insurance. He now goes 2 times a week, and there has been a lot of improvement. He's 2 1/2 and still can't speak in complete sentences, but he can say more words than we can count and puts 2 to 3 words together. For us it's a huge accomplishment!


    It was a hard road for me in that when he wasn't talking yet, everybody was blaming me "You're not talking to him enough." "You're not reading to him enough." "He needs to be in daycare." Arrgggh! All not true!

    Then when we decided to put him in speech therapy (which he greatly enjoys!), we got so much heck from family for pressuring him too hard, and "he'll talk when he's ready", and that we were trying to mold him into a perfect child. The truth is, that yes, some kids just are late talkers and will outgrow it. But some are not! Some have honest-to-goodness neurological disorders where they may never learn to talk without help. (Not trying to scare you!!!.....17 months is still young and he could have a word explosion at any time.) The point being, early intervention is critical if there is a disorder, so I didn't want to take the gamble of a wait-and-see policy where he could be losing precious months of needed therapy.

    So if you're concerned, a hearing test and free evaluation by your states early intervention program may be a good first step. Also see if your library as "The Late Talker".
    Amy

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  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Blissful_in_TX
    So if you're concerned, a hearing test and free evaluation by your states early intervention program may be a good first step.
    I agree with this. It won't hurt anything to have some testing/evaluations done now. It will give you peace of mind, and though odds are he's fine, if there is any need for intervention at least you've caught it early which can make a HUGE difference.

    I teach 3-5 year olds w/ developmental delays (some are just speech delayed). I've gotten several 3 or 4 year olds who have had no interventions until they came to my classroom. I wish they would have had something sooner.

    Good luck. I know these aren't easy decisions. I have a coworker whose 15 month old son wasn't saying many words at his last pediatrician visit. She was told he was speech delayed and got upset, but after talking to our school speech therapist, she had his hearing tested. Turns out he has a mild hearing loss, but will need to wear hearing aids. THough upset, she's thankful that they found this early so he can get the help he needs. Our speech therapist said she should see improvement almost overnight once he gets his hearing aids.
    Jennifer


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  6. #6
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    Speech/language therapy

    Dear 615Bride,
    I am a pediatric speech/language pathologist and would suggest that you first have your son's hearing tested by an audiologist (in a soundproof room with headsets). The hearing tests that are performed at a pediatrician's office are just screenings and not always accurate, particularly with a young child. After you've had this done and successfully ruled out any hearing issue, an evaluation by an ASHA certified speech/language pathologist would give you some insight about your son's communication skills and how to help him. You can either ask your pediatrician for a referral or go to the ASHA website (ASHA.org) to find someone. When you arrive at the home page, just click on "The Public" and then go to the professional referral section to find someone qualified in your area.
    Although the speech/language pathologist might recommend therapy, he or she can also guide you as to how you can work with him at home to help his communication skills progress. Most importantly, he/she might be able to alleviate your concerns and worries if your son is indeed doing well. As someone who works as a Language and Literacy specialist, I'm sure you know that the earlier a child (and his family) receives support, the less likely that child wil have any later difficulties.
    Best of luck to you! If you have any questions, or need any other help, please feel free to PM me. I'd be more than happy to help you.
    Karen

  7. #7
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    My sister had her son evaluated when he was 2 years old and said only 2 or 3 words (although he undestood absolutely everything said to him). The pediatrician checked his hearing, which was fine. And so far as anyone can tell it was either karma or good manners*, but after the first speech evaluation he was referred for a more intensive eval and he immediately started talking. I saw him in September, when he was 2 yrs 3 mos and he was talking up a storm. His older sister was a late talker, too, for no apparent reason.

    *Apparently one of his first phrases was "Well, !#@$@!." I say the kid was just being polite, keeping his thoughts to himself.
    "Why should you go to jail for a crime someone else noticed?" - attorney Bob Loblaw, Arrested Development

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  8. #8
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    My twins were very slow in talking. When they were 18 months, I had them evaluated by our early intervention program to see if they qualifed for speech therapy. They didn't, but the evaluation experience was so helpful to me! They referred me to Easter Seals to get hearing tests. A speech therapist came to our home and tested the boys. They gave me concrete benchmarks -- 6 more words by 2 years old -- and encouraged me to read, read, read! I started reading to them for an hour every morning after breakfast. Kind of crazy, but I was an at-home mom and able to do this (plus they LOVED it). The speech came, slowly but surely!

    I say trust your instincts. If you think there may be a problem, have your son tested. The earlier intervention happens, the better!

  9. #9
    I'm not a mom yet, so, I can't contribute as well as the rest of the posters. I do think, however, that some children seem slow to take certain steps because they want to do well when they do. For example, I didn't speak until I could make complete sentences and I didn't walk until I could do so without stumbling. The scariest part of all this is that I remember that part of my life. I can recall sitting on the rug shaking my head no as my mother prompted me to walk over to her. I also remember practicing in my room when I was unsupervised. Freaky, huh?
    Don't worry, I'm sure your DS is just fine.

  10. #10
    Both of my kids (one boy and one girl) didn't really start talking until they were two. That was the benchmark DD's pediatrician was waiting for. She was waiting until then to refer us to early intervention. 6-8 weeks before her second birthday, DD started saying many new words a day--stringing sentences together, etc. When DS, was also slow to talk, I was a little more prepared. He really got going shortly after his second birthday.

    If it would ease your mind, get the testing done now. Otherwise, take a deep breath and wait a little while. If things haven't improved at all by the time he turns two, get him evaluated.

  11. #11
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    I wouldn't be too worried as long as your DS can 1) hear well and 2) understand what's being said to him. If you don't think he has any problems with those two abilities, I wouldn't worry too much about him not talking yet. My DS was 2 when our pediatrician gave us that advice, and he started talking within a few months, and hasn't had any difficulties.
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  12. #12
    If you are wanting to get tested and have insurance, I suggest going through your insurance first before your school district. I am battling to get speech therapy paid for because the school hasn't serviced my daughter for over a month. My insurance won't pay because I went to the school district first and they consider her taken care of; however, the school has hardly any speech therapists and they won't return my calls and we've only had 5 weeks out of 11 weeks of sessions. I am so frustrated that I paid to have her re-evaluated and I am going to continue to pay for private speech and continue to fight my insurance company to pay the bill.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by emncar
    If you are wanting to get tested and have insurance, I suggest going through your insurance first before your school district. I am battling to get speech therapy paid for because the school hasn't serviced my daughter for over a month. My insurance won't pay because I went to the school district first and they consider her taken care of; however, the school has hardly any speech therapists and they won't return my calls and we've only had 5 weeks out of 11 weeks of sessions. I am so frustrated that I paid to have her re-evaluated and I am going to continue to pay for private speech and continue to fight my insurance company to pay the bill.

    I think this is one of those things that depends on where you live. We have an amazing early intervention program...but not every area does.

  14. #14
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    I agree with everyone who says to go ahead and get full evaluations, but also try not to worry too much, since he DOES obviously understand you, he is verbalizing, and some kids just talk later than others.

    One of my favorite books is A Girl Named Zippy by Haven Kimmel. It is a memoir of Haven's early- to mid-childhood. When she was an infant, she had a terrible ear infection that was nearly fatal. As she recovered, her family though it might have inflicted permanent damage: She was small, she had very little hair, and she was lively (hence the nickname Zippy) but she didn't talk. At all. Her mother had started a baby book, but there were few entries after the illness. Then, Kimmel wrote,

    The last entry is dated four months before my third birthday:

    This weekend we went camping. After dinner little Zippy was running in circles around the campfire, drinking from her bottle, and Bob (her father) decided she'd had it long enough. He walked over to her and said, "Sweetheart, you're a big girl now, and it's time for you to give up that bottle. I want you to just give it to me, and we're going to throw it in the fire. Okay?" This was met with many protests from Danny and Melinda and me; we all felt that there was no call to take something away from one who has so little. The baby looked at us; back at her dad, and then pulled the bottle out of her mouth with an audible pop, and said, clear as daylight, "I'll make a deal with you." Her first words! Bob didn't hesistate. "What's the deal?" She said, "If you let me keep it, I'll hide it when company comes and I won't tell no-body." He thought about it for just a moment, and then shook his head. "Nope. No deal." So she handed over the bottle, and we all stood together while Bob threw it in the fire. It was a little pink bottle, made of plastic. It melted into a pool.

    Now that we know she can talk, all I can say is: dear God. Please give that child some hair. Amen.
    Last edited by funniegrrl; 11-02-2006 at 10:03 AM.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by stefania4
    *Apparently one of his first phrases was "Well, !#@$@!." I say the kid was just being polite, keeping his thoughts to himself.
    Quote Originally Posted by emptyspool
    You are probably a very good mom and anticipate his needs so that he doesn't have to ask for much.
    I think there's a joke about a boy who doesn't talk for years and years. Then one day he speaks up about his mom serving him soggy cereal (or something like that). They ask why he didn't talk before and he answers "Well..up until now things have been okay"

    My first thoughts in reading about your issues were pretty much the same as emptyspool. Perhaps he just has other effective ways to communicate with you and hasn't had the need to verbalize much.
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  16. #16
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    i agree that evaluation is never a bad idea if you are worried. But I wanted to chime in with more assurances that it might simply be he's a late talker! My middle son was slow to talk too (lots of pointing and grunting) and now he's the one who never shuts up (even in his sleep). As he's grown older, it is apparent that that is how he is - he resists learning new things but then suddenly jumps in with both feet.

    Good luck.
    Avril

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  17. #17
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    I have to ditto the other posters on this one. My DSs were late talkers too - and I don't think they were saying any words at 18 months. We had their hearing tested, and we had a speech therapist evaluate them - and she wasn't concerned because their comprehension was good. I don't think that they were really talking much until about 2 1/2.
    Sherri

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  18. #18
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    Okay, coming in late to this thread, but wanted to add my experience. DS had had *numerous* ear infections and was also not saying any words by his 18-month checkup. The combination of those 2 facts made the pediatrician refer us to Early Intervention. He had a hearing test and failed because of fluid in the ears. They said that if the fluid had been present all along (which it likely had been) then he hadn't been hearing sounds normally and therefore couldn't reproduce them. He had tubes put in, he was evaluated by Early Intervention and qualified for speech therapy. We started therapy, he said his first word at 21 months, and by his 2nd birthday had a huge language explosion and hasn't stopped talking for a second since then. So while I don't think the therapy is what got him talking (I think the tubes were more responsible), I agree as others have said, it's absolutely worth having his hearing checked, and IMO, an evaluation by EI.

    ETA: You mentioned your son understands lots of words and can follow directions. From what I've been told, that's an excellent sign that all is functioning properly. At DS's evaluation at 18 months, he tested at 26 months for understanding language (I think it's called receptive language?), his spoken language tested at 9 months.
    "There are times when we're dirt broke, hungry, and freezing, and I ask myself, why the hell am I still living here? And then they call. And I remember." ~Mark, Rent

  19. #19
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    Thank you so much for all of the replies so far. I'm a mommy and this is my first baby so all logic sometimes goes out the window!

    I put a call in to the ped to express my concern and see if he still wants me to wait until his 18 mos check up (which will be a little bit after he turns 18 months). The hearing issue will definitely be something I mention. Every time they look in his ears they comment on how "perfect" they look and he's never had an infection about which we are aware so we have no hint that he is having trouble in that area but I will ask. I also hesitate to think he's having trouble with hearing since he seems to understand so much but we'll see!

    Thanks also to the people who mentioned that their child wasn't talking at this age. Does that mean NO WORDS like my DS or just a few and not as many as "average"?

    When I talked with the nurse this morning she was about to hang up with me and tell me to wait until the 18 month check but when I told her he has no words she said she'd rather have a doctor call me. I'll keep everyone posted!

    Thank you.

  20. #20
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    Thanks also to the people who mentioned that their child wasn't talking at this age. Does that mean NO WORDS like my DS or just a few and not as many as "average"?
    My nephew was not saying any words at eighteen months - he was pointing and clearly understood things, though. He's two and a half now and has been seeing a speech therapist for two-three months. No real reason diagnosed, but he's a late talker (his receptive language is normal or above age) - the therapy is helping a lot. He's saying more and more words although still probably not at the level of many kids his age. My sister isn't worried about it much as he's clearly happy and healthy.

  21. #21
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    Update!

    Well, the ped called me back and said he could tell I was concerned and with my background I was looking out for things. He is going to set us up for an EI (Early Intervention) screening. He said it doesn't hurt to do that. His expressive language is behind but at this stage there is still a wide range. SO.... what can people tell me about the EI evaluations? or maybe I should start a new thread for that....

    Thanks again everyone!

  22. #22
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    Argh, I just lost my whole post!

    After we called EI, I believe they had 30 days by law to schedule the evaluation. It was done in our home, by 2 evaluators, one of whom was a speech therapist because that was the main issue. By law they are required to test all areas of development, including physical. The whole evaluation took about 2 hours or so, and it looked like they were just playing with him. DS loved it. They brought a big bag of toys and books and he was thrilled. They did things like ask him to point to objects they named in books, follow simple directions, make a little tower out of blocks, walk up our stairs, and so on. They encouraged him to make sounds, etc. They wrote up their report at my kitchen table and presented it to me at the end. Since he qualified for speech therapy only (I believe a score of 33% below age level in any area qualifies you for services), we called our caseworker who then worked on setting up services for us. I believe they had another 30 days or so to get that done. We were pleased with how well and how professionally the whole thing was handled.

    If you'd like more detailed info about what was in the eval, PM me and I'd be happy to pull out the paperwork and let you know.
    "There are times when we're dirt broke, hungry, and freezing, and I ask myself, why the hell am I still living here? And then they call. And I remember." ~Mark, Rent

  23. #23
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    I haven't read all the responses but just wanted to say my DS is in a similar situation. He was 18 months on 10/11 and it has just been in the last couple of weeks that he's started using words. He probably only has 5 or 6 at this point and that's mostly if you prompt him. Can you say...

    He's a second child and I understand it's not that uncommon for additional children to be much later in their speech than first kids. I catch myself all the time saying "so you want X" - I can understand him very well. He knows quite a few signs and pick up a new one very quickly. He understands directions and can point to body parts etc. He actually has some vocalizations that are rather destinctive - his daycare teacher says he could communicate with dolphins.

    Our pediatrician isn't worried. He's also very very social.

    gotta run but wanted to give you a similar situation.

    Kim

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by 615bride
    Thanks also to the people who mentioned that their child wasn't talking at this age. Does that mean NO WORDS like my DS or just a few and not as many as "average"?
    DS wasn't saying any words. However he was saying maybe 3-4 words around 15 months and then stopped, and that actually what was very concerning. A regression is much more concerning versus a delay that still follows the same learning path, if that makes sense.

    Our EI visit was much like LA98's, except they had us provide our own toys. So I had a bunch of stacking rings, blocks, shape sorter, etc set out.
    Amy

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  25. #25
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    I'm curious if your son is exposed to more than one language at home. Many times, if more than one language is spoken a child might simply be procesing all that information. They understand but may tend to start speaking "later" than others. (I have two DDs who are bilingual. The older was much quieter and observant than the second.)
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  26. #26
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    My younger daughter who is now almost 27 months is what I would informally call "speech delayed" in that she really didn't talk much at all until she turned about 2 (just a few words here and there). Slowly she has been putting words together and now can say 2-3 word sentences. I have not had her evaluated because she is talking and up here in Canada things with the medical system are so different, but I'll spare you the gory details of that situation.

    I did know that she was understanding everything because she could follow complex directions and reacted appropriately to everything we said.

    One thing that in my cursory glance of this thread I didn't noticed mentioned was signing with your child. I started signing with DD#2 when she was about a year. She started signing back a couple of months later. This was quite useful for a speech delayed child. At least she could tell me that she wanted "more" or that she wanted an "apple" or "milk" etc. I learned the signs from an excellent DVD series called Signing Time. At first I checked out the DVD's from my library. Then I found the show on a PBS station. Now we've started asking for these DVD's as gifts because they are so much fun to watch. My articulate four-year-old LOVES them! Both girls will watch them. Now that she's talking, my two-year-old does not really sign any more, but she will sign, "I love you". How great is that??? I think the website is signingtime.org. Just do a google search and you'll find it.

  27. #27
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    Dear 615bride,

    I read with interest the entire thread regarding your 17 month old. My step-daughter could have written word for word your initial message. I printed your message and all the responses to pass along to her.

    Our grandson will be 20 months on Sunday. Your paragraph described him exactly. He was delayed in crawling and walking and had early intervention help with that and now runs all over the place! She is taking a pro-active stance - even though she's been told they wouldn't diagnose a "disorder" until he's older. He can sign several words and understands quite a bit.

    I was the oldest of five - one sister and three brothers (in that order). When my brother didn't talk - my mother was concerned and spoke to the doctor about it. He told her my brother didn't need to talk: he had two sisters, a mother and grandmother doting on him - all he had to do was point and we would jump! (Obviously, that was quite some time ago)

    It sounds like you are a very good mother who is aware of her childs need and wants and I hope you will keep us posted and want to wish you all the best.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hoodone
    I started signing with DD#2 when she was about a year. She started signing back a couple of months later. This was quite useful for a speech delayed child. At least she could tell me that she wanted "more" or that she wanted an "apple" or "milk" etc. I learned the signs from an excellent DVD series called Signing Time.
    DS loved those DVDs too! But in our case, he watched the first video for months and we would model the signs, and he could understand our signs, but would NEVER do them back. Within one day of his first speech appointment, he was doing the sign for "more" and "open". Go figure!
    Amy

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  29. #29
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    Thanks again, everyone. FWIW, we do sign with him and he will sign "milk" and "more" and "eat" - the essentials I guess!

  30. #30
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    We've been signing too, and when we introduce a new one she's picking it up amazingly fast (like within a day) but she still won't talk! She'll sign to us, however. The evaluator suggested signing and saying the word very exaggerated at the same time. So when we sign "More" we ask "Mmmmmmmmmmore? Mmmmmmmmmmmore?" so she is supposed to be associating that consonant sound with the word and sign. So far it isn't working, but I guess at least she's signing back, which is a start.
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