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Thread: Regular cabbage vs. savoy cabbage vs. napa cabbage

  1. #1
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    Regular cabbage vs. savoy cabbage vs. napa cabbage

    I am trying to broaden DH's vegetable repertoire. He likes raw cabbage and sauerkraut, but not so much cooked cabbage - maybe just because of the smell. I am wondering about the other types of cabbage, and before I buy a huge head of either one, I thought I'd inquire here. I'd like to use cabbage in stir fries, cabbage rolls, egg roll filling, etc.

    Savoy cabbage has a similar spherical head form as "regular" cabbage. Is the taste or smell similar? If the cooked smell is milder, it looks like a good alterative, especially for cabbage rolls.

    Napa cabbage looks more like bok choy in form than like the spherical cabbages. Can you desribe its taste or how it is different from the others?

    Thanks,
    Megan

  2. #2
    DmOrtega Guest
    Savoy cabbage is milder and lighter in texture than the other two. It doesn't require long cooking times to soften it.

    Regular cabbage is the hardest, crunchiest, and needs a longer cooking time to soften. Which probably makes this the strongest tasting.

    Savoy is more like bok choy. I guess it would fall somewhere in between regular and savoy cabbage.

  3. #3
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    NashVegas, baby!
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    And, even regular cabbage doesn't really smell when used in moderate quantities and cooked briefly, as in stir-fries.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by funniegrrl View Post
    And, even regular cabbage doesn't really smell when used in moderate quantities and cooked briefly, as in stir-fries.
    DH is very sensitive to food smells, though. Unfortunately, I am the opposite with respect to things like garlic and cabbage.

  5. #5
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    I hate cabbage except in Asian food--all I have ever seen called for in Asian food is Napa, although I suspect it is how they cook it as well. But to me Napa is very mild and pleasant--a good cabbage to add chopped to Vietnamese salads or to put in any Asian spring rolls, etc. I am not really familiar with Savoy, though, I should emphasize.

    Laura
    -Laura

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  6. #6
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    What is today called Napa cabbage (it was nappa when I was a kid) is indeed closely related to bok choy and quite mild - no smell at all when cooking, in my experience, though it's also nice for use in Asian slaws. More cooking tips here
    Happiness is not a goal, it is a byproduct. - Eleanor Roosevelt

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canice View Post
    What is today called Napa cabbage (it was nappa when I was a kid) is indeed closely related to bok choy and quite mild - no smell at all when cooking, in my experience, though it's also nice for use in Asian slaws. More cooking tips here
    Ditto and emphasize that. I really really REALLY hate the smell of cooked cabbage. Sadly, bc I know it is good for you.
    -Laura

    Muffins are for people who don't have the 'nads to order cake for breakfast.
    --Seth, "Kitchen Confidential" (the show, not the book)

    www.thespicedlife.com/

  8. #8
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    Meganator, have you made this soup? V popular on the BB, and wonderful warming dish. I use lots more nappa cabbage than it calls for (not that you were asking for recipes!).


    CHINESE CHICKEN NOODLE SOUP WITH SESAME AND GREEN ONIONS

    Recipe By :
    Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00
    Categories :

    Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    1 pound skinless boneless chicken breast halves -- cut in 1/4" strips
    3 T soy sauce
    2 T dry Sherry
    2 T oriental sesame oil
    3 cloves garlic -- minced
    3 T tahini
    2 T fresh ginger -- peeled and minced
    1 T sugar
    1 T seasoned rice vinegar
    1 1/2 t chili-garlic sauce
    4 cups Napa cabbage -- chopped
    6 green onions -- thinly sliced
    8 cups canned low salt chicken broth
    1 14 oz. package fresh yakisoba noodles or Chinese
    pan-fry noodles
    1/2 cup fresh cilantro

    Stir chicken, soy sauce, Sherry and 1 T sesame oil in medium bowl to blend. Let stand 20 minutes or refrigerate up to 2 hrs.

    Whisk garlic, tahini, ginger, sugar, vinegar and chili sauce in small bowl.

    Heat remaining 1 T sesame oil in heavy large pot over medium-high heat. Add cabbage and green onions and saute until cabbage is tender, about 5 minutes.

    Add broth and bring to a boil. Add chicken with marinade and tahini-garlic mixture.

    Reduce heat to low and simmer until chicken is cooked through, about 5 minutes. (Can be made 1 day ahead Cool slightly; cover and refrigerate. Bring to simmer before continuing)

    Cook noodles in large pot of boiling salted water until tender, about 5 minutes. Drain.

    Add to soup in pot. Stir in half of cilantro. Season soup with salt and pepper. Sprinkle with remaining cilantro.
    Happiness is not a goal, it is a byproduct. - Eleanor Roosevelt

  9. #9
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    Thanks for all of the discussion.

    Canice, that soup looks tasty, I think I will give it a try. Do you use both the green and white parts of the cabbage interchangably?

  10. #10
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    In that soup I would. I guess if I were making spring rolls or such I'd use just the tender green part. Hope you enjoy it: definitely hearty and warming with loads of flavor!
    Happiness is not a goal, it is a byproduct. - Eleanor Roosevelt

  11. #11
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    Keep an eye out for the March issue of Eating Well. I just got mine today, and haven't read it yet, but there's an article devoted to cabbage and the different varieties. Good looking recipes too.
    Merry: I don't think he knows about second breakfast, Pip.
    Pippin: What about elevenses? Luncheon? Afternoon tea? Dinner? Supper? He knows about them, doesn't he?


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