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Thread: Other names for "Grandmother"?

  1. #1
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    Other names for "Grandmother"?

    I accidently posted this under Healthy Living, so I figured I'd post it here as well.

    I'm in search of some alternative names for a grandma, whether they are cultural, a different language, or just something cute and random. Any input?

    Thanks!
    -Amy-

  2. #2
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    Nonna = Italian
    Grandmama = French

  3. #3
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    My paternal grandmother didn't want to be called grandma. Her first name was Rosella so I called her La La or Lal for short.
    A well rounded person is perfectly pointless. - Carrie

  4. #4
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    We called my father's mother "Grammy."
    Springtime is my time of year!

  5. #5
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    Grandmere
    Nanny or Nana
    Ma-Mae
    Bubbe

  6. #6
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    My great-grandmother is Nana, my grandmother was Granny. I've heard G as well.


    "Life isn't about finding yourself. Life is about creating yourself" ~ George Bernard Shaw


  7. #7
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    My mother is Nana
    My ex MIL is Oma ( German for Grandmother )
    My dear friend's mother is Tutu ( Hawaiian for Grandmother )
    I had a Nonni and Poppi growing up ( Italian )
    Terri _A
    I'm anal retentive. I'm a workaholic. I have insomnia. And I'm a control freak. That's why I'm not married. Who could stand me?” -Madonna

    Read my ramblings about food and my nutty life on A Girl in the South!

  8. #8
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    Maternal grandmother was "Grandmom."
    Paternal grandmother was "Grandmama."

  9. #9
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    We had Grandma and Graddy. Graddy came from early language - cross between Grandma and Daddy. It stuck and she loved it - and part of the reason she loved it was its uniquness.
    Life is not the way it's supposed to be. It's the way it is. The way you cope with it is what makes the difference.

  10. #10
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    My son calls his grandmother - Oma (it's Dutch).

  11. #11
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    My grandmothers were "Grandma" and "Gran." When I was little, we called Gran, "Ganny" or "Granny," which is also what my children called her.

    My kids call my mom, "Mamu" (sounds like Mah-Moo). When DS was first learning how to talk he called me "mama" and my mom, "mamu," and it just stuck. He'll refer to her as "my grandma" to his friends or other people, but calls her Mamu.

    I like Nana, Gram and Gran.

  12. #12
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    My mom is Gonga (gone-ga). DS1 started calling her that and we're not sure where he got it. He calls MIL Grandma. DS2 does whatever his brother does.

  13. #13
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    Oma
    Grams

    Those are the two we had for various grandmothers other than regular "grandma".

  14. #14
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    Polish, and the only thing I ever addressed mine as: Babci.

    Bob

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by erinlovesmarc View Post
    Grandmama = French
    Maybe that's Quebecois French, but here in France the literal translation of "grandmother" is "grand-mre," and the colloquial term is "Mamie."
    "In France, cooking is a serious art form and a national sport."
    --Julia Child

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobmark226 View Post
    Polish, and the only thing I ever addressed mine as: Babci.

    Bob

    Bob - that's what we called my maternal grandmother. She spelled it Baci, though. My mother decided several years ago, when my grandmother was still living, that she would spell hers Babci as a way for my nieces & nephews to distinguish between the two. Never made much sense to me as we pronounce both Bah-chee.


    When the 1st nephew arrived on the scene, we called my Dad 'Grampy' as per his request. (That's what we called his Dad.) When said nephew began to talk, all he would call Dad is 'Bakey.' He was adamant about it & would stomp his foot & shake his head when we tried to correct him. We have no idea where this name came from. My sister, his other Aunt, is called Guggi. Her name is Heather, so again, no clue about the origins. Now all the nieces and nephews call Dad 'Bakey' & Heather is Guggi. Both of them are tickled to have had such original names bestowed upon them.
    Connie

  17. #17
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    My mom's mom felt that she was too young (45) to be a grandma when my brother was born so she is Nana.

    My friend's kids call her mom Mochi (ma chee), not sure where that came from.

    I was just thinking the other day about what my future kids will call my mom and MIL.
    (`'�.�*�*�.�'�)
    � ** Schmee** �
    (�.�'�*�*`'� .�)

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  18. #18
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    In my family, we always add the first name of the person after their "title" so it was always Auntie Jane, Uncle John but also Grandma Eileen etc.

    In my mother's family, the tendancy is to add and " ie" sound on the end of all the female names so my maternal grandmother's name was Noel and she was Grannie Noelie.

  19. #19
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    I've heard Baba and Baka (both slavic, I believe).

  20. #20
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    Thank you!!!
    Keep 'em coming, please!
    -Amy-

  21. #21
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    DD calls my IL's Oma and Opa (grandmother, grandfather). She has 2 cousins older than her and they started the trend.

    For my parents, we started calling them Abuela and Abuelo (spanish). When DD started to make sounds, Abuelo became Abu, pronounced Abooo. My mother's nickname is Nini (for Virginia), and somehow that has stuck instead of Abuela.

    My maternal grandparents were to have been Abuela and Abuelo. I was the first grandchild and also had trouble enunciating, so they became Ababa and Ababo. My paternal grandmother was Nana and my paternal grandfather was Pop-Pop.
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  22. #22
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    My kids called my parents Mommom and Poppop.

  23. #23
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    From our family, and names I've heard along the way from friend's families:
    Oma (German)
    Mom-Mom
    Gramma
    Mimi
    Mia
    Grandma
    Grammy
    Nana
    Nani
    Boomie
    Ya-Ya (Greek)
    "If you aren't living on the edge, you're taking up too much space."

  24. #24
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    my mom goes by Bauma for the grandchildren (an old family name for grandma) and my dad chose Pappy
    my Polish greatgrandparents went by Bubbie and Gudgy (phonic spelling)
    altho technically i think it is babcia and dziadek
    - Josie


  25. #25
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    My grandmother had us call her Buna.
    I don't know why. She died before I ever got a chance to ask her. I've tried to look it up, but I don't know what it means. My dad doesn't know either. She didn't want to be called grandma.

  26. #26
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    I called my Japanese grandmother Baba
    My DS calls my mother-in-law Bubbi

  27. #27
    We have MeMy and Oma. DS1 started off at 12 months calling my mom Nanananana. Then two months later, he started calling her MeMy. I think he was trying to say My Nanananana and got struck on MeMy. She loves it, but sometimes gets confused if she is MeMy or grandma which is what my niece calls her.

  28. #28
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    I tried to get my children to use the Hungarian names, nagy-apa/ nagy-anya, or nagy-papa/ nagy-mama, but since they did not hear much Hungarian on a daily basis, they did not pick up the names. Grandma/grandpa had to suffice. I tried to have the grandchildren use the names for me and DH, but again no luck. Guess I wasn't persistent enough.

    ccooney mentioned the word "baci." Using this word with a male name in Hungary is a term of endearment such as Bob-baci. They use "neni" with a female name such as Mari-neni.

  29. #29
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    Our girls call my mom Mormor (Swedish).

  30. #30
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    I called my grandmother "Bobi" (pronounced "bubby"), which is Yiddish for grandmother. My mother also goes by Bobi.

    My DH's stepmother is of Lithuanian descent and the grandkids call her "Busha."
    For you to be here now, trillions of drifting atoms had somehow to assemble in an intricate and intriguingly obliging manner to create you. It's an arrangement so specialized and particular that it has never been tried before and will only exist this once.

    --Bill Bryson, "A Short History of Nearly Everything"

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