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Thread: More No Knead bread recipes

  1. #1
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    More No Knead bread recipes

    I had great success with the famous NY Times No Knead bread and so was excited to find these new recipes by Nancy Baggett published in the Washington Post newspaper.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...x.html?sub=new

    Hope the link works- you may have to sign in or up and then go to the Food section.

    I have not tried any of these recipes....yet.
    The recipes include:
    Slow Rise Wheat Bread
    SlowRise No Knead Rustic Caraway-Beer Bread
    Slow Rise Cinnamon Raisin bread
    You think you're not ever going to be able to eat another thing, but alas, you will find yourself feeling strangely peckish around teatime. The more you eat, the more you want. That's the way it goes."

    Nigella Lawson

  2. #2
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    Thanks for this - I too loved the NYT article. Let me know when you try it!

  3. #3
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    Thanks for posting this. I have these recipes tucked neatly away in my To Trys. I lovvvvved the No Knead Bread and can't wait to try these. I also purchased the book No Need To Knead after having success with Bittman's bread and those recipes have worked beautifully as well. Darla
    Read and Feed!!!

  4. #4
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    There was a followup with an interesting and simpler version of the bread in the Times recently that might also be of interest. I didn't post it because I'm a kneader myself and I thought someone else would:

    Soon the Bread will be baking itself

    Bob

  5. #5
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    I feel the need to knead too Bob. I have baked bread by hand (usually 8 loaves at a time) for over 25 years. Sadly I can't even think of kneading right now due to significant shoulder problems.

    So No Knead is what I need right now.
    I hope to make the wheat recipe later this week so will report back if I do.
    You think you're not ever going to be able to eat another thing, but alas, you will find yourself feeling strangely peckish around teatime. The more you eat, the more you want. That's the way it goes."

    Nigella Lawson

  6. #6
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    Maureen, the herb and onion bread from Laurel's Kitchen (as posted by you long ago) was the first bread I ever made and the first recipe off this BB I ever made. Might be appropriate with tonight's beef stew (Sandy's recipe).

    Editing.... From Anna Thomas ("Vegetarian Epicure") not Laurel. No wonder I couldn't find the recipe.

    From The Vegetarian Epicure by Anna Thomas

    Here is the fastest yeast bread I know, and a delicious one. I like to bake it late in the day, to serve warm with dinner. The aroma of the herbs is the greatest appetizer you could devise.

    1/2c. milk
    1 1/2Tbsp. sugar
    1 tsp. salt
    1 Tbsp. butter
    1 package (2 1/4 tsp.) yeast
    1/2c. warm water
    2 1/4c. white or whole wheat flour
    1/2 small onion, minced
    1/2 tsp. dried dillweed
    1 tsp. crushed dried rosemary

    Scald the milk and dissolve in it the sugar, salt and butter; cool to lukewarm. In a large bowl, dissolve the yeast in the warm water. Add the cooled milk, flour, onion and herbs.
    Stir well with a large wooden spoon.

    When the batter is smooth, cover the bowl with a towel and let the dough rise in a warm place until triple in bulk- about 45 minutes. Stir down, and beat vigorously for a few minutes, then turn into a greased bread pan.
    Let it stand for 10 minutes before putting into a preheated 350 deg. oven. Bake about one hour.

    The dough will be sticky- resist the urge to add too much flour. My bread was done in 50 minutes. Of course you can vary the herbs. Delicious!
    Happiness is not a goal, it is a byproduct. - Eleanor Roosevelt

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by kima View Post
    Sadly I can't even think of kneading right now due to significant shoulder problems.
    Have you seen Suzanne Dunaway's No Need to Knead? I recently borrowed it from the library and it looked good. I was too busy to try any of the recipes, but plan to borrow it again when I am less busy. It might be help you get through this no-kneading period.
    *******************
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  8. #8
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    Thanks Patti.
    I owned that book for a long time and love the Ciabatta recipe in there. I gave it away though because I like to knead.
    I am learning that I should hang on to every cookbook-I have ended buying new editions of ones i have given away or even taken my own book out from the local library!

    I think I gave that one to the library as a matter of fact so will take it out and look it over again.
    You think you're not ever going to be able to eat another thing, but alas, you will find yourself feeling strangely peckish around teatime. The more you eat, the more you want. That's the way it goes."

    Nigella Lawson

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canice View Post
    Maureen, the herb and onion bread from Laurel's Kitchen (as posted by you long ago) was the first bread I ever made and the first recipe off this BB I ever made. Might be appropriate with tonight's beef stew (Sandy's recipe).

    Editing.... From Anna Thomas ("Vegetarian Epicure") not Laurel. No wonder I couldn't find the recipe.

    From The Vegetarian Epicure by Anna Thomas

    Here is the fastest yeast bread I know, and a delicious one. I like to bake it late in the day, to serve warm with dinner. The aroma of the herbs is the greatest appetizer you could devise.

    1/2c. milk
    1 1/2Tbsp. sugar
    1 tsp. salt
    1 Tbsp. butter
    1 package (2 1/4 tsp.) yeast
    1/2c. warm water
    2 1/4c. white or whole wheat flour
    1/2 small onion, minced
    1/2 tsp. dried dillweed
    1 tsp. crushed dried rosemary

    Scald the milk and dissolve in it the sugar, salt and butter; cool to lukewarm. In a large bowl, dissolve the yeast in the warm water. Add the cooled milk, flour, onion and herbs.
    Stir well with a large wooden spoon.

    When the batter is smooth, cover the bowl with a towel and let the dough rise in a warm place until triple in bulk- about 45 minutes. Stir down, and beat vigorously for a few minutes, then turn into a greased bread pan.
    Let it stand for 10 minutes before putting into a preheated 350 deg. oven. Bake about one hour.

    The dough will be sticky- resist the urge to add too much flour. My bread was done in 50 minutes. Of course you can vary the herbs. Delicious!
    That is the first yeast bread I ever made as well Canice

    Mind you that was before you were born.
    You think you're not ever going to be able to eat another thing, but alas, you will find yourself feeling strangely peckish around teatime. The more you eat, the more you want. That's the way it goes."

    Nigella Lawson

  10. #10
    If anyone gets cooks illustrated they have some recipes for no knead bread in the January 2008 magazine.
    "Everyone is kneaded out of the same dough but not baked in the same oven." - Yiddish Proverb

  11. #11
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    I tried the Simple Crusty Bread from the book "Artisan Bread in Five Minutes A Day" from the article that Bob linked. Thanks Bob!!! Anyone else tried any of these new No Knead recipes???

    It is soooo easy and makes a beautiful loaf with a crusty exterior and tender inside. It actually looks even better than the NO Knead Loaf because this one doesn't have to be flipped upside down before baking. Just a sprinkle of flour and three slashes down the middle and it came out looking perfect. I used a stone and did the pan of water in the bottom of the oven too. The only thing I like better about the No Knead loaf is that it has more holes than this one has. The interior of that loaf is a little bit lighter. Here is the recipe for the one I made today. I would definately repeat this. It says to raise 2-5 hours and sometimes I need that flexability. I let it go 5 hours today. Oh and I also let the dough rest the last 40 mins on parchment and then used my pizza paddle to scoot it onto the stone. That works better for me. Darla


    * Exported from MasterCook *

    Simple Crusty Bread Adapted from ''Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day,''

    Recipe By :
    Serving Size : 0 Preparation Time :0:00
    Categories : Yeast Breads

    Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    1 1/2 tablespoons yeast
    1 1/2 tablespoons kosher salt
    6 1/2 cups unbleached -- all-purpose flour, more for dusting dough
    Cornmeal.

    In a large bowl or plastic container, mix yeast and salt into 3 cups lukewarm water (about 100 degrees). Stir in flour, mixing until there are no dry patches. Dough will be quite loose. Cover, but not with an airtight lid. Let dough rise at room temperature 2 hours (or up to 5 hours).

    2. Bake at this point or refrigerate, covered, for as long as two weeks. When ready to bake, sprinkle a little flour on dough and cut off a grapefruit-size piece with serrated knife. Turn dough in hands to lightly stretch surface, creating a rounded top and a lumpy bottom. Put dough on pizza peel sprinkled with cornmeal; let rest 40 minutes. Repeat with remaining dough or refrigerate it.

    3. Place broiler pan on bottom of oven. Place baking stone on middle rack and turn oven to 450 degrees; heat stone at that temperature for 20 minutes.

    4. Dust dough with flour, slash top with serrated or very sharp knife three times. Slide onto stone. Pour one cup hot water into broiler pan and shut oven quickly to trap steam. Bake until well browned, about 30 minutes. Cool completely.

    Yield: 4 loaves.

    Variation: If not using stone, stretch rounded dough into oval and place in a greased, nonstick loaf pan. Let rest 40 minutes if fresh, an extra hour if refrigerated. Heat oven to 450 degrees for 5 minutes. Place pan on middle rack.

    S(Internet Address):
    "http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9C0DEEDB153FF932A15752C1A9619C8B 63&sec=&spon=&pagewanted=all"
    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 53 Calories; 1g Fat (11.9% calories from fat); 7g Protein; 7g Carbohydrate; 5g Dietary Fiber; 0mg Cholesterol; 8469mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1/2 Grain(Starch); 1 Lean Meat.

    NOTES : You can refrigerate a four-loaf batch of dough, or even an eight-loaf batch, for as long as two weeks, cut off a piece when you want to bake it, and it's ready to eat in about two hours.

    Nutr. Assoc. : 0 0 0 0
    Read and Feed!!!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by dgeevanson View Post
    I tried the Simple Crusty Bread from the book "Artisan Bread in Five Minutes A Day" from the article that Bob linked. Thanks Bob!!! Anyone else tried any of these new No Knead recipes???

    It is soooo easy and makes a beautiful loaf with a crusty exterior and tender inside. It actually looks even better than the NO Knead Loaf because this one doesn't have to be flipped upside down before baking. Just a sprinkle of flour and three slashes down the middle and it came out looking perfect. I used a stone and did the pan of water in the bottom of the oven too. The only thing I like better about the No Knead loaf is that it has more holes than this one has. The interior of that loaf is a little bit lighter. Here is the recipe for the one I made today. I would definately repeat this. It says to raise 2-5 hours and sometimes I need that flexability. I let it go 5 hours today. Oh and I also let the dough rest the last 40 mins on parchment and then used my pizza paddle to scoot it onto the stone. That works better for me. Darla


    * Exported from MasterCook *

    Simple Crusty Bread Adapted from ''Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day,''

    Recipe By :
    Serving Size : 0 Preparation Time :0:00
    Categories : Yeast Breads

    Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    1 1/2 tablespoons yeast
    1 1/2 tablespoons kosher salt
    6 1/2 cups unbleached -- all-purpose flour, more for dusting dough
    Cornmeal.

    In a large bowl or plastic container, mix yeast and salt into 3 cups lukewarm water (about 100 degrees). Stir in flour, mixing until there are no dry patches. Dough will be quite loose. Cover, but not with an airtight lid. Let dough rise at room temperature 2 hours (or up to 5 hours).

    2. Bake at this point or refrigerate, covered, for as long as two weeks. When ready to bake, sprinkle a little flour on dough and cut off a grapefruit-size piece with serrated knife. Turn dough in hands to lightly stretch surface, creating a rounded top and a lumpy bottom. Put dough on pizza peel sprinkled with cornmeal; let rest 40 minutes. Repeat with remaining dough or refrigerate it.

    3. Place broiler pan on bottom of oven. Place baking stone on middle rack and turn oven to 450 degrees; heat stone at that temperature for 20 minutes.

    4. Dust dough with flour, slash top with serrated or very sharp knife three times. Slide onto stone. Pour one cup hot water into broiler pan and shut oven quickly to trap steam. Bake until well browned, about 30 minutes. Cool completely.

    Yield: 4 loaves.

    Variation: If not using stone, stretch rounded dough into oval and place in a greased, nonstick loaf pan. Let rest 40 minutes if fresh, an extra hour if refrigerated. Heat oven to 450 degrees for 5 minutes. Place pan on middle rack.

    S(Internet Address):
    "http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9C0DEEDB153FF932A15752C1A9619C8B 63&sec=&spon=&pagewanted=all"
    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 53 Calories; 1g Fat (11.9% calories from fat); 7g Protein; 7g Carbohydrate; 5g Dietary Fiber; 0mg Cholesterol; 8469mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1/2 Grain(Starch); 1 Lean Meat.

    NOTES : You can refrigerate a four-loaf batch of dough, or even an eight-loaf batch, for as long as two weeks, cut off a piece when you want to bake it, and it's ready to eat in about two hours.

    Nutr. Assoc. : 0 0 0 0
    I used this recipe but tried something a little different.
    The first loaf made I followed the directions. This did make a nice round loaf with a nice smooth texture. I was able to hollow out and use for holding a dip. Then I put the remaider dough in the fridge for a couple of days as this recipe makes 4 loaves. (next time I will decrease the salt a bit).
    With the remaining batter I decided to follow the directions for baking from the New York No Knead bread recipe using all the remaining dough. I let it sit on the counter, covered with an inverted bowl, on parchment paper. After it warmed I inverted into my LeCreuset which had been heated in a 450 degree oven for 30 minutes and baked it with the cover on. This made the bread texture just like the New York No Knead recipe, very crusty, chewy, and all those nice little holes.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by sharhamm View Post
    I used this recipe but tried something a little different.
    The first loaf made I followed the directions. This did make a nice round loaf with a nice smooth texture. I was able to hollow out and use for holding a dip. Then I put the remaider dough in the fridge for a couple of days as this recipe makes 4 loaves. (next time I will decrease the salt a bit).
    With the remaining batter I decided to follow the directions for baking from the New York No Knead bread recipe using all the remaining dough. I let it sit on the counter, covered with an inverted bowl, on parchment paper. After it warmed I inverted into my LeCreuset which had been heated in a 450 degree oven for 30 minutes and baked it with the cover on. This made the bread texture just like the New York No Knead recipe, very crusty, chewy, and all those nice little holes.
    Thanks! Good to know. I'm going to play around with this recipe using part whole grain. I'll try the New York No Knead baking method as well. I like those little holes in there! Darla
    Read and Feed!!!

  14. #14

    Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day

    I'm Jeff Hertzberg, one of the co-authors of "Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day," the book covered in the NY Times on November 21, 2007, which some of you on this thread have tried. As you know, what makes our method unique is not the wet dough or the no-knead, it's the ability to store it long-term, pre-mixed in the refrigerator (without needing to "feed"). I'd make a few suggestions: First, make enough dough so you can store it longer: up to two weeks in the fridge. You'll get a sense of how the flavor changes as it matures. There was an herb bread lover in this thread, so feel free to add the herbs you like to the basic recipe in the Times; they won't harm our bread's storage capacity. And there are sweets of all kinds in our book, mostly based on a variation with brioche dough (stored up to five days in the fridge, or frozen). And finally, check out our website for suggestions, other recipes, and video. Our book has been hard to find because we quickly sold out of our first two printings since release on November 13. Things are about to loosen up so hang in there if you're interested.

    Jeff
    www.artisanbreadinfive.com

  15. #15
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    Jeff, I have your book out from the library. Yesterday I listened to the Splendid Table that you were one. Now I'm really looking forward to making my first batch of bread from your book this weekend.

    Thanks for dropping by!
    *******************
    my personal chef service: Anastasia's Table Personal Chef Service

  16. #16

    Me,too!

    How cool that Jeff stopped by to add to the discussion!

    I just got this book last night from the library, and I've enjoyed reading through it today, with plans to bake tomorrow.

    I suspect I will also be ordering it from Amazon, because this method really appeals to me!

    Thanks for the info and for the reference to the website!
    Laurie

  17. #17
    How cool! Mr. Hertzberg, you are responsible for helping me overcome my fear of yeast! I purchased your book last week and promptly made my first-ever loaves of bread!

    Thanks for shopping by! I appreciate the link to your website.

    Debie
    Never take life seriously. Nobody gets out alive anyway.

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