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Thread: At what age should a child be able to drink out of a cup?

  1. #1
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    At what age should a child be able to drink out of a cup?

    I've always been very happy with my daughter's daycare, but right now I'm really frustrated. They informed us on Monday that she would no longer be allowed to use a sippy cup, and that she has to use a regular cup or she won't get anything to drink. :mad: She is going to be 2 in March. Can most kids drink out of a cup by now? She was born two months premature and weighed under 4 pounds, so she has always lagged a little behind in various milestones. I just feel that this is too short of notice though, and I don't see what the big deal is about using a sippy cup anyway! How is that so inconvenient for them?? I had the day off yesterday, and tried to work on it with her some more, but she just doesn't get it yet. She tries hard, and does lift up the cup to her mouth, but then spills some or gets scared and just cries and cries and cries. I don't want to be at work wondering if she is crying and thirsty all day. I'm going to speak to the director today to request additional time for her, but I was just curious as to when most kids are able to drink from a regular cup.

  2. #2
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    that's ridiculous. I'd be upset too. my 2 1/2 yo still uses a sippy and will for as long as I want and as long as she wants. sorry you are going through this.

  3. #3
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    What, are they freakin' crazy? My kids will never have regular cups. We'll maybe when they are in high school or something. They are 3 and 5. While they can drink out of a regular cup, who wants to clean up all those spills? They are just not that coordinated and miss the counter, miss their lips, knock the cup over, the list is endless. I shake my head. My 5 year old is asking what I am writing. She likes her sippy cups. "I want more sippy cups!," she says. "I want them NOW!" (typical). "NOW, NOW, NOW". "I love to drink out of sippy cups and I want more."

    They also won't get out of their 5-point harness car seats anytime soon, but that's another topic. Why rush these things?

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    I agree with the previous poster--that is a bit extreme. My DD used a sippy cup until she was at least four. She could drink from a cup before that, but it was a lot better for all of us if she used a sippy. But, I'm trying to think back, I don't think she could even drink from a cup, at least not without a mess, at age 2. And to threaten to withhold liquid would send up a red flag to me.
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  5. #5
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    Holy cow that is awful. Well I would have been screwed at your daycare since DD#1 did not use even a sippy cup until a little over 2 (she used straws and those straw-based sippy cups). She just could not seem to get that she needed to tilt her head back and let gravity work with her. She does now (she is 31 mos) but it took til about 25-26 mos. DD#2 has used her sippy cup since a much younger age and it always astounds me even though I suspect DD#2 is more the norm. That is really ridiculous. My only thought is, has she recently changed rooms? I know sometimes (my kids are not in daycare, but from my friends) that if your kid has to "graduate" to an older room they must hit certain milestones. Usually this seemed to be an issue re: walking and potty training.

    I am really sorry and don't blame you for being mad. However, is there any chance (just bc this is how kids are) that she will learn better there and use one better there than for you at home? DD#1 actually rarely uses a sippy cup at my mom's house, she just never has. But I promise you that if I had her not use one here I would be cleaning up spills all day long.
    -Laura

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  6. #6
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    My DS is just turning 2 in a week and in his room at school they use open cups. Just this month he moved from a room that used the open cups at afternoon snack only to a room that uses open cups only.

    I give him "sippy" cups at home, but they are the Tupperware tumblers with a lid on them so they don't spill when they are knocked over. They do not have a valve on them.

    My DD, who just turned 4, has been using an open cup FT for at least a year now, maybe longer.

    We use small, kid-sized cups and have very few spills. When I let DS use an open cup, I only put a small amount in it.
    “When one door of happiness closes, another opens; but often we look so long at the closed
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  7. #7
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    I am sorry that you are worrying extra about your dd in daycare.

    from the perspective of someone who worked at one, each room has a different set of standards for their meal times. i found this to be pretty standard regardless of the daycare. where i worked, i believe the age was potty-trained or 3 yrs and they were moved to regular cups. i know it sounds awful, but i think she will probably get used to drinking out the cups if you just let it go. and the daycare teachers/whatever you want to call them are used to cleaning up spills. i also remember that room was also where the children were seriously discouraged from using their fingers to eat. reminding the kids constantly to use their spoons was a big part of our job.

    has she been potty-trained recently? or maybe something has happened that shows the daycare she is ready to try something new? i also know that it is hard to make an exception in a room full of toddlers. the other toddlers just won't understand why they can't have the sippy cup too.

    i don't mean to sound un-sympathetic, and i do think the premature issue is a valid concern. i guess i am just trying to reassure you that i don't think she will cry all day or not drink at daycare
    - Josie


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    Just to provide a different prospective my kids' daycare started using open cups when the kids are around 18M. They just do it - they don't require a kid to be able to do it or have the parents do it at home. I remember being surprised when I saw the kids drinking out of open cups and realized they could do it. It can be messy (at first) but the teachers deal with it. Jamie's been drinking from an open cup for quite awhile (so long I can't remember when we said good-bye to the sippy cups) and he's only 2.5. They also have the kids sitting at a table in chairs starting at a year (wobbler-sized tables). Impressed the heck out of me the first time I saw it to see 8 wobblers sitting and eating.

    We followed along at home not too long after they start using the open cups at school. I would say a high majority of the mess/spills came from knocking the cup and not from drinking from it. Knocking the cup when they weren't paying attention to where the cup is on the table.

    I guess I've seen my kids do things I never thought to even think they could do because the teachers expect it...so I'd be inclined to see how it goes that first day and then if there's an issue see about getting an exception. Unless you think there is a developmental issue that's in play here.

    Kim

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    My older son was also 2 months premature and was not able to drink out of a cup on his own until he was 3.

    I agree with your frustration. I think that 2 is to young to expect this, especially on such short notice. Anyone who was to deal with a 2 yr old knows that they won't try or do anything until they are good and ready. I would however, try it with her as well as speak to the director to make your concerns known.

    My younger son is almost 4 and while he can drink out of a cup. I always take his cup to daycare with him..it's a cup with a lid and straw. Do you think your school will allow that?

    Let know how it goes.
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  10. #10
    Like others described above, our daycare phases out sippy cups as kids get older. DS (age 27 mos) is currently in the Toddler I room, which has kids ranging in age from about 18 mos. to 2 1/2 depending on their developmental abilities. They allow sippy cups, straw cups, whatever the parents bring in. The Toddler II room, which most kids move into at 2 1/2, uses open cups only. DS's room "practices" with open cups on occasion. What I send in with him, and use at home, are the Tupperware cups that Lara described, with a lid but no valve. He occasionally drinks from an open cup at home, spills a lot of course, but he's getting good at it.

    I would think that the daycare teachers will help your DD learn to use an open cup rather than expecting her to just show up one day with the skill perfected by you and DD at home, and aren't planning to let her go thirsty if she refuses or cries initially (if the latter is their method, I'd be out of there pronto). I think you can go on doing whatever you and DD are comfortable with at home, and the daycare should be willing to help her with the transition there. I understand your frustration and stress though- they definitely gave you short notice, and I hope talking to the director will help put your mind at ease.

  11. #11
    DD will be 4 in April and she still uses a sippy cup, although she can use an open cup. She actually only uses a sippy cup for milk. She won't drink milk in anything but a sippy cup.

    I agree with the others. 2 seems a bit young to be only drinking from an open cup. I can understand them using open cups periodically to teach, but to use only that seems ridiculous. Perhaps after all of the messes that are made at the daycare, the policy will change back to sippy cups. I can't imagine that there won't be one heck of a mess with open cups. I've spilled drinks myself many times and I'm 34!

  12. #12
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    I wouldn't worry about that at all! Your DD is right where she should be. My DS (now almost 5) started daycare when he was 26 months. In the two's room at his school, they had all the kids using open cups so it was a transition he just had to make. We still used sippy cups at home for a few months afterward.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by RunnerKim View Post
    Just to provide a different prospective my kids' daycare started using open cups when the kids are around 18M. They just do it - they don't require a kid to be able to do it or have the parents do it at home. I remember being surprised when I saw the kids drinking out of open cups and realized they could do it. It can be messy (at first) but the teachers deal with it. Jamie's been drinking from an open cup for quite awhile (so long I can't remember when we said good-bye to the sippy cups) and he's only 2.5. They also have the kids sitting at a table in chairs starting at a year (wobbler-sized tables). Impressed the heck out of me the first time I saw it to see 8 wobblers sitting and eating.

    We followed along at home not too long after they start using the open cups at school. I would say a high majority of the mess/spills came from knocking the cup and not from drinking from it. Knocking the cup when they weren't paying attention to where the cup is on the table.

    I guess I've seen my kids do things I never thought to even think they could do because the teachers expect it...so I'd be inclined to see how it goes that first day and then if there's an issue see about getting an exception. Unless you think there is a developmental issue that's in play here.

    Kim

    Little kids can do a lot more than you think they can. My son's toddler program did the same. They used clear plastic cups to the kids could see through them, put small amounts in them at first, and had the kids put the cups at the top of their plates so they didn't get knocked over as easily.

    My three's used table knives to cut their food (as they were able.) They did it safely and mastered a big skill pretty easily. They started by spreading condiments on bread, bagels and muffins and moved on to cutting.

    Montessori infant/toddler programs never use cups with tops. Since sippy cups are really bad for children's teeth, I'm gradually introducing open cups to my ten-month-old as she transitions away from bottles. Very gradually and always in my hand.
    Beth


    "A teacher who says, 'I am a good teacher,' is in trouble. A good teacher is frequently troubled, in doubt, frustrated. Perfection doesn't exist. Everyone needs help." (Amelia Gambetti)

  14. #14
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    I can completely understand your concern. At the same time, my boys' preschool didn't even HAVE sippy cups to offer. All the kids used open cups from day one. It wasn't an issue for us because we continued to use sippies at home. The teachers dealt with messes, cleanups and teaching proper control of the cups. I'm actually glad they did because I didn't have to work on it with them. They are now six and seven. My six-year-old now usually drinks out of a cup with a top and a straw (just because I let him drink in the den and am lazy about cleanups). But both have been able to use a regular cup (not always spill-free, mind you) for years. OT, but the preschool also, btw, did a bangup job on potty training for me. They worked on it when I wasn't completely committed, yet it made my job so much easier in the long run.
    Hang in there. I don't understand what the big deal is about them HAVING to stop the sippies at this exact moment. I'm sure your daycare has some sort of system. It's just too bad you didn't have more warning. You know your child best and what she's capable of. That said, I would try to go with it and see what happens. I agree with the other posters that kids can handle more than you think. Good luck whatever happens.
    TKay

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    Quote Originally Posted by fci5767 View Post
    Little kids can do a lot more than you think they can. My son's toddler program did the same. They used clear plastic cups to the kids could see through them, put small amounts in them at first, and had the kids put the cups at the top of their plates so they didn't get knocked over as easily.

    My three's used table knives to cut their food (as they were able.) They did it safely and mastered a big skill pretty easily. They started by spreading condiments on bread, bagels and muffins and moved on to cutting.

    Montessori infant/toddler programs never use cups with tops. Since sippy cups are really bad for children's teeth, I'm gradually introducing open cups to my ten-month-old as she transitions away from bottles. Very gradually and always in my hand.
    So? Who cares, they are children's teeth and will be losing them. That would be my ped, my dentist, a periodontist I know and a lot of other people speaking, not just me. This weird obsession with what is good for baby teeth is beyond me....
    -Laura

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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by ljt2r View Post
    So? Who cares, they are children's teeth and will be losing them. That would be my ped, my dentist, a periodontist I know and a lot of other people speaking, not just me. This weird obsession with what is good for baby teeth is beyond me....
    Actually, I think that the reason is b/c it can cause speech problems. My son has a speech delay and that was one thing our therapist wanted to see was what kind of sippy cups we were using.

    It can also affect the positioning of permanent teeth as the baby teeth come out and the new ones come in. That was the explanation given to me by the dentist as to why he wanted my DD to stop sucking her thumb at age 4.
    “When one door of happiness closes, another opens; but often we look so long at the closed
    door that we do not see the one which has been opened for us.”

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  17. #17
    Just another mom checking in ...

    Madeleine is 19 months and has been using an open cup at daycare since Thanksgiving. I know that it is one of the 'developmental guidelines' that she must be able to master before they move her up to the toddler room when she is 2. At her 18 month visit the doctor did ask if she had started using a cup at all and mentioned speech problems as well.

    We still use a sippy at home (but without the valve), partly because I haven't gone out to get cups and then I forget when I am at the store. We went out to eat last weekend and I forgot the sippy. I got an extra plastic cup and then gave her a little milk at a time. I was actually surprised at how well she did.
    Maria

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by ljt2r View Post
    So? Who cares, they are children's teeth and will be losing them. That would be my ped, my dentist, a periodontist I know and a lot of other people speaking, not just me. This weird obsession with what is good for baby teeth is beyond me....
    Doctors and dentists obviously vary in their opinions- but my understanding, from my pediatrician and my friend who is a pediatric dentist, is that you want your child's baby teeth to be healthy because 1) a cavity can become abscessed and infected- rare but happens; 2) as Lara said, healthy baby teeth and gums hold the space for adult teeth to come in in their correct positions; 3) and also as Lara said, they're important for proper speech development. Teeth that are diseased or pushed out of place make it hard for young children to learn to speak properly. Those all make good sense to me- if I can help my son avoid a dentist's drill, speech issues, or braces by taking care of his teeth now, I'd be delighted. I'd hardly call it an obsession, though.

    Andrea, I did want to say that I think Josie's (avariell's) point about it being hard to make exceptions in a toddler classrooms is a good one. I know that's the reasoning behind some of the "requirements" at DS's daycare. But they don't institute them w/o warning- it's usually part of a transition to a new room, so all the kids are learning together. I'm hung up on the director telling you that your DD won't get anything to drink if she doesn't use an open cup- I find that really unsympathetic and unsupportive (not to mention that withholding fluids has got to be some kind of violation of standards) so I hope she didn't mean it literally.

  19. #19
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    Sippy cups can cause speech problems.

    Our Ped told us, as our kids were approaching 18 months to start weening them off the sippy cup. DS was in a preschool program at that age and all the kids drank water from Dixie cups -- they did not allow sippy cups.

    If it were me, I would be happy to let the daycare introduce regular cups as they will be the ones having to deal with the little dribble and spills. I am sure your DD will do fine.
    Go for it!

  20. #20
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    I just did a quick search and this might explain a bit more:




    Warnings are coming from two fronts: First, some speech pathologists say children are using sippy cups long after they should have made the transition to a traditional, lidless cup. They're still sucking and slurping when they ought to be swilling and gulping. The consequence: a lazy tongue that produces sloppy "th" and "st" sounds, at least temporarily.
    Nursery-school teachers were among the first to raise concerns.

    "What we've noticed in the past five or six years is that articulation for young children has totally disappeared," says Gail Smith, director of the Gingham Giraffe Preschool in Chatham, N.J. "And I directly attribute it to the use of sippy cups."

    Ms. Smith first heard about the concerns from a speech therapist. Before warning parents at her nursery school to ditch the cups, she took one home and drank from it herself for a weekend. She became concerned that sucking a sippy cup was a lot like sucking a thumb. "You do tend to leave your tongue under the cup," she says.

    Second, some pediatric dentists say they are beginning to see more cavities among children who use sippy cups as if they were baby bottles -- sucking milk, juice and other sugary drinks for hours at time, sometimes even while they sleep.


    You can read the whole article here: http://www.mindfully.org/Plastic/Sip...ech12feb02.htm
    Go for it!

  21. #21
    Speaking from experience here - you definitely want to be careful with those baby teeth! DS had 6 (count them - SIX!) cavities in his baby teeth, and most were on molars that they typically keep until they are 12. We had them filled and/or capped to the tune of $800, and that was after insurance had paid their portion. You can't just pull baby teeth if something happens, since they are "placeholders" for the other permanent teeth as they are growing in. I'm not saying this had anything at all to do with sippy cups (both of my kids drank out of them, and DD doesn't have any cavities, despite DS brushing his teeth more frequently and better than she does). But if sippy cups make kids more prone to dental issues, I wouldn't use them if I had it to do all over again.

    In regards to sippy cups - my DD's speech therapist, pediatrician, and dentist all told me that the ones with straws (instead of spouts) are best, since they exercise their tongues more and help them develop the muscles they need for talking. Not that that helps much with the open cup issue, but maybe it's an option for home, if you're trying to wean little ones off the sippy cups.

  22. #22
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    I was checking the AAP series of books for milestones at various ages before DS's 18-month checkup, and 18 months is when they feel children can do it. We had a month or so before his check-up, and I was very diligent about using open cups for meals, and sure enough, he was doing fine at 18 mo. I have to admit I would NEVER have tried it if I wasn't pretty AR about making sure DS was meeting milestones.

    Even now, over a year later, I don't fill his cup to the brim, but I generally have a cup of water for him to fill sitting on the table, and he uses cups at mealtimes. We're letting him use our lightest glasses more often now - he can drink from anything; we just weren't giving him credit. I have old plastic sippy cup bottoms with lids with straw holes that I use regular straws in for convenience. I found a cup and plate set at IKEA that has a weighted bottom that worked very well at the beginning - the set comes with a sharp enough fork and a nice toddler knife that work well too - I think the spoon is a little big.

    So from a SHOULD perspective, 18 months, but it's your call unless circumstances dictate otherwise.
    -- Nancy

  23. #23
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    Oral Motor Development and Speech Development

    So it's interesting to me to hear what pediatricians are telling parents about the current best practice in speech pathology. Although previously we did think that oral motor skills (eating, blowing, chewing) and speech motor skills (making sounds correctly) were related and many interventions were developed with this in mind, this is no longer the case.

    Research in the last 10 years has shown that oral motor control isn't directly linked to speech skills, even in very young children who have very little practice talking:

    http://jslhr.asha.org/cgi/content/abstract/39/5/1034
    (I believe you can see the abstracts but not the articles unfortunately).

    Furthermore, efficacy studies have shown that oral motor interventions (e.g. tongue strengthening exercises) do not lead to measurable changes in speech sounds production skills in preschoolers with speech sound disorders.
    http://www.thieme-connect.com/ejourn...5/s-2002-23508

    Although this may not hold for certain specific populations of children (e.g. children with cerebral palsy), because they have a motor speech disorder, it is true for most children following a generally typical course of development. Based on this information, I don't believe that using/not using a sippy cup will have a measurable effect on speech sound production. And a specific review of the research shows that no one has actually done a study showing that use of a sippy cup is/isn't related to accuracy of speech sounds (!). Clearly, as a profession, we need to do a better job of disseminating that information to pediatricians and practicing clinicians.

    I can't speak to the issue of cavities, however.

    Amanda

    (I teach speech pathology at the University of Iowa)

  24. #24
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    DD#1 saw a speech therapist this entire past summer and never once was the sippy cup mentioned (supporting ajowen here). And she has made huge progress (astounding progress) all while using one.

    As to cavities, behavior with the sippy cup is also important as someone mentioned--for example my kids only drink water all day in theirs and they certainly don't fall asleep sucking on it or anything.

    Look if it seems like I bristled it's because in a thread where plenty of parents have made it clear their kids use sippy cups, it is clearly going to raise some hackles (mine anyway) to just announce that "sippy cups are really bad for teeth". I was only reacting to that statement--although I stand by my response in general in the sense that it is far from agreed upon. I am going to ask my dad to ask his pediatric dentist friend, who if he does agree with me, I at that point will have the word of quite a lot of professionals on the subject. So if you want to say that your pediatrician thinks they are bad for teeth, that is fine (generic you here), but I don't really like it when people state things as fact when they are not agreed upon by the experts in that field.

    ETA I am having a bad night with this poor lost dog (see my other thread). Sorry if I sound overly b*tchy.
    Last edited by ljt2r; 01-09-2008 at 08:02 PM.
    -Laura

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  25. #25
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    I haven't read all the responses, sorry in advance. When my son moved from the 1YO to the 2YO class, sippies were done away with. We still use sippies at home most of the time, but at school he drinks from a cup. Honestly, I'm glad they took on that responsibility of teaching him to drink from a cup, saved me from cleaning up a lot of messes. He's really good at it now.

    Don't worry, your daughter will do fine. And if she doesn't catch on right away, I'm sure they will work something out.

    Hugs, stuff about our kids is so hard!

    Kim

  26. #26
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    Thanks for all the responses everyone. My daughter ended up getting suddenly sick yesterday and ended up missing daycare and won't be able to go today either. She must know what is going on! Anyway, I have been busy with taking care of her and going to the doctor etc., so I haven't had a chance to read through all the posts yet, but I will when I get a chance later tonight. Thanks again!

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by ljt2r View Post
    DD#1 saw a speech therapist this entire past summer and never once was the sippy cup mentioned (supporting ajowen here). And she has made huge progress (astounding progress) all while using one.

    As to cavities, behavior with the sippy cup is also important as someone mentioned--for example my kids only drink water all day in theirs and they certainly don't fall asleep sucking on it or anything.

    Look if it seems like I bristled it's because in a thread where plenty of parents have made it clear their kids use sippy cups, it is clearly going to raise some hackles (mine anyway) to just announce that "sippy cups are really bad for teeth". I was only reacting to that statement--although I stand by my response in general in the sense that it is far from agreed upon. I am going to ask my dad to ask his pediatric dentist friend, who if he does agree with me, I at that point will have the word of quite a lot of professionals on the subject. So if you want to say that your pediatrician thinks they are bad for teeth, that is fine (generic you here), but I don't really like it when people state things as fact when they are not agreed upon by the experts in that field.

    ETA I am having a bad night with this poor lost dog (see my other thread). Sorry if I sound overly b*tchy.
    I'm sorry that you were offended by my comments but I will stand by what I've been told by my children's pediatricians (2), my dentist, and my son's pediatric dentist. They are looking at it from the cavity perspective. Regular sippy cups (the kind with spouts instead of straws) generally aim the liquid at the back of the child's teeth. Most children don't brush right after drinking so liquids tend to stay there. And most children in a child care center aren't drinking water (unfortunately) it's more likely to be juice or milk.

    I've used sippy cups with my son on occasion. I'm not perfect. We don't need them any more so we don't have any. My eleven-month-old is learning to sip water from a cup held in my hand but will use Born Free sippy cups when she transitions to milk. If she still lives with me when she's a little older, we will start using open cups. If she goes to Early Head Start, she will use regular cups when she's two.

    Parents aren't perfect. Lots of us do things that we read may not be best for children. We have to decide what we think and go from there. I've been reading a lot about extended rear facing toddlers in car seats. It's new to me but something I've been doing a lot of thinking about. I'm also the only one that I know in real life that brushes my baby's teeth and wipes her gums.
    Beth


    "A teacher who says, 'I am a good teacher,' is in trouble. A good teacher is frequently troubled, in doubt, frustrated. Perfection doesn't exist. Everyone needs help." (Amelia Gambetti)

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by ljt2r View Post
    So? Who cares, they are children's teeth and will be losing them. That would be my ped, my dentist, a periodontist I know and a lot of other people speaking, not just me. This weird obsession with what is good for baby teeth is beyond me....
    I realize this is further hijacking, but you should really check with a peds. dentist on this. My daughter who is 7 has had extensive dental work done to the tune of a lot of $$$. To make a long story short, her two front-most molars were rotting and had to be removed. Her dentist is still very concerned, because what happens to the baby teeth CAN affect the adult teeth lurking underneath. Meaning, that the new molars could pop up in four years already damaged. They can't do anything until they pop out, but unhealthy baby teeth do affect the adult teeth growing underneath.
    Merry: I don't think he knows about second breakfast, Pip.
    Pippin: What about elevenses? Luncheon? Afternoon tea? Dinner? Supper? He knows about them, doesn't he?


    I'm food bloggin' almost daily at Tummy Treasure!

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
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    SW Ohio
    Posts
    6,489

    Mea Culpa

    OK so I did some digging with the dentist I know (well he did the digging, I asked him to) and he said that worrying about cavities and sippy cups is not worth it if they are only drinking water and not overly attached to the cup (which is more or less what I said earlier). BUT he did say that sippy cups can cause occlusion (messing up how the teeth come in, like you guys said) in a way that was worse than thumb sucking. My reaction to this thread was based a lot on thumb sucking--I had a lot of friends who had well-meaning acquaintances who insisted that thumb sucking was terrible for teeth. Well this one I investigated extensively and at this age (under 3 basically) the experts I asked disagreed. I assumed sippy cups were the same and they are not totally, and for that I apologize. I am a little annoyed at my ped and the world in general since this is the first I have heard of it and since my kids are 16 mos apart and I am a SAHM it just did not seem worth bothering with weaning the older kid. So I guess I need to--add that one to the to-do list. I do also want to emphasize though (and this one is not just one guy's opinion, this is one I have experienced myself time and time again because I have one of those difficult mouths) that the dentist I asked did caution me that dentistry in the last 10-20 years has boomed to the extent that the market is saturated and he felt a lot of this was overrated as dentists are desperate for work to do. I personally have been told 3 different times I needed a root canal, only to get second opinions each time and have them say no that's crazy. And my teeth, FWIW, are fine as of this moment. So I think the moral is for some of you who are having problems with your kids' teeth to get second opinions and for me to not let my frustration with the attitude toward animals in this world (see my other post) spill over into posts about child rearing!
    -Laura

    Muffins are for people who don't have the 'nads to order cake for breakfast.
    --Seth, "Kitchen Confidential" (the show, not the book)

    www.thespicedlife.com/

  30. #30
    Ljt2r - It's funny, since this has come up on the boards before in regards to breast vs. bottle-feeding, staying home vs. working, etc. There are so many things that we think we should (or that experts think we should be doing) be doing with our kids, that you pretty much have to pick and choose and hope for the best.

    Obviously, I should have been flossing my kids' teeth every night, and I'll fess up and admit that that certainly didn't happen. Oh - and believe me, I got a second and a third opinion too! Even I could see the cavities on the x-rays...

    In the big scheme of things, I don't think sippy cups are anything to worry about if your kids are drinking water and aren't dragging them around all day. I mainly just wanted to point out that baby teeth are pretty darned important - and I was previously in the "why don't we just pull them or wait till they fall out" camp.

    I'm interested to hear that speech pathologists have a different take on the sippy cup / straw issue. DD had speech therapy 6 years ago, so things are obviously different now.

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