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Thread: Farm-Raised Tilapia Is Actually Unhealthy

  1. #1
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    Exclamation Farm-Raised Tilapia Is Actually Unhealthy

    Here is a link to an article that talks about farm-raised tilapia (I don't know what the stats are for wild tilapia). The article states that farm-raised tilapia has mostly omega-6 fatty acids - more than doughnuts or bacon - and very few omega-3 fatty acids. This can cause a lot of inflammatory problems.

    Yikes! It seems I'm always reading that tilapia, along with salmon, is recommended for heart patients and others looking out for their health.

    <sigh> http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/25590107/

  2. #2
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    We heard that on the Today Show and we were upset. Both salmon and tilapia were recommended to us, as well. Yikes! In moderation?
    "There are two means of refuge from the miseries of life: music and cats." - Albert Schweitzer

  3. #3
    DmOrtega Guest
    Do you ever feel like you are chasing shadows? How frustrating!

    Wild fish is getting scarce enough for us to be creating farms to raise the fish for consumption. They really aren't any different then say the cattle or chicken that is raised for consumption. It's not surprising that farm raised fish doesn't have the properties of wild fish. We are force feeding them some concoction to recreate the wild environment. We forget, however, that it isn't the wild environment they were meant to be in.

  4. #4
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    I've been watching reaction to the Wake Forest study. A medical coalition's response:

    http://www.reuters.com/article/press...08+PRN20080717

  5. #5
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    Add to the fish dilemma that catfish are going to be disappearing from the market. Excellent (long) front page analysis from the "Times":

    As Price of Grain Rises, Catfish Farms Dry Up

    Bob

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by DmOrtega View Post

    Wild fish is getting scarce enough for us to be creating farms to raise the fish for consumption. They really aren't any different then say the cattle or chicken that is raised for consumption. It's not surprising that farm raised fish doesn't have the properties of wild fish. We are force feeding them some concoction to recreate the wild environment. We forget, however, that it isn't the wild environment they were meant to be in.
    My thoughts exactly! And while I feel bad that the rising corn prices are putting people out of business, I have to think there's just something flat out wrong about feeding corn to fish (in addition to almost every other animal that we eat). It's such a vicious cycle - too much corn, too many subsidies, too many animals depending on the extra - when one part breaks down (corn going to ethanol production, or underwater from flooding), it has an enormous domino effect.

  7. #7
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    More info on farm raised fish (and another reason, IMO, to shop at Whole Foods)

    http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/prod...uaculture.html

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Holly in KC View Post
    (and another reason, IMO, to shop at Whole Foods)

    Tilapia comes from Ecuador and Costa Rica. Catfish are fed grains. So they're not necessarily the solution for folks with issues about either.

    Bob

  9. #9
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    I don't think I've ever seen wild tilapia in the stores....
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  10. #10
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    Tilapia are native to Africa - there are hundreds of species. There are some farms in the lower states that raise them but the total quantity may not be much compared to imports.
    Anne

  11. #11
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    I don't eat tilapia but not because of it's unhealthy status but rather it's a trash fish that isn't native to the US but that's a whole other thread. But talk about not eating local!

    I only eat wild catfish and not very often. We do have catfish in our ponds but we don't feed them, other than the perch we put in for them. However, DH doesn't like cleaning them so we let neighbors fish for them.

    I wish there was a better solution than farm-raised fish since I really prefer to eat fish over beef and chicken.
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  12. #12
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    A lot of Tilapia sold at Walmart comes from China.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by stacy7272 View Post
    Here is a link to an article that talks about farm-raised tilapia (I don't know what the stats are for wild tilapia). The article states that farm-raised tilapia has mostly omega-6 fatty acids - more than doughnuts or bacon - and very few omega-3 fatty acids. This can cause a lot of inflammatory problems.

    Yikes! It seems I'm always reading that tilapia, along with salmon, is recommended for heart patients and others looking out for their health.

    <sigh> http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/25590107/
    Omega-6 FA (also called linoleic acids) are not necessarily "bad" fatty acids. It is actually one of the essential fatty acids but our society gets more of these than the Omega-3s. Omega-6s can be converted to Omega-3s but not very effeciently and b/c of our overly-processed diet, it makes it even more difficult.

    "Although most Americans obtain an excess of linoleic acid, often it is not converted to GLA because of metabolic problems caused by diets rich in sugar, alcohol, or trans fats from processed foods, as well as smoking, pollution, stress, aging, viral infections, and other illnesses such as diabetes. It is best to eliminate these factors when possible, but some prefer to supplement with GLA-rich foods such as borage oil, black currant seed oil, or evening primrose oil."


    Tilapia is definitely healthier than a donut (of course, it has more omega-6s, which is a good fat!). I hope people don't take this info and run with it. As a nutriton major, it is so frustrating when the media puts this kind of info out there and the masses take it for 100% truth. My MIL already told me she's giving up tilapia and heading straight for the donut.

    The real fatty fish, such as salmon, are rich in Omega-3s. Salmon is fattier than tilapia, but again, it's a "good" fat.

  14. #14
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    I also read the article on this board. We love farmed raised tilapia which I buy fresh @Costco. Bought some more yesterday! We watch our diet eat little meat, more chicken breasts in a casseroles, broiled, bbq etc. If you paid attention to all the hype you read, you would starve. I am almost 84 and and he is almost 88, so what the heck!
    Curleytop

  15. #15
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    OK, so what is "trash fish?" If you mean it's a scavenger (and I don't know if it is or not), well ... so is catfish, and many if not all crustaceans (shrimp, crabs, etc.) If you eat one type of scavenger, why not others? If you don't mean scavenger, then what?

    P.S. Curleytop, I like your style!
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by funniegrrl View Post
    OK, so what is "trash fish?" If you mean it's a scavenger (and I don't know if it is or not), well ... so is catfish, and many if not all crustaceans (shrimp, crabs, etc.) If you eat one type of scavenger, why not others? If you don't mean scavenger, then what?
    When it's imported to waters such as lakes, ponds, streams, estuaries, etc it destroys the natural habitat for those creatures already living there...so that's why it referred to as a trash fish. It's invasive and destructive. Never mind the fact that it has no taste. Fine for those who don't care for fish.
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by funniegrrl View Post
    OK, so what is "trash fish?"
    A trash fish is a fish that is not, for the most part, eaten by humans-thus the word 'trash" is used. Examples are drum, carp, gar, etc.

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