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Thread: Cast iron corn bread pan - do they EVER work?

  1. #1

    Cast iron corn bread pan - do they EVER work?

    I bought one of those cute Lodge cast iron corn bread pans - you know, the bread sticks come out looking like corn on the cob. Well, they would if they would quit sticking to the pan!! I've seasoned and seasoned. I've only had it a few days, but I didn't think I'd have to ruin so many corn bread sticks.

    Any hope for this???

    Debie
    Never take life seriously. Nobody gets out alive anyway.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chefzhat View Post
    I bought one of those cute Lodge cast iron corn bread pans - you know, the bread sticks come out looking like corn on the cob. Well, they would if they would quit sticking to the pan!! I've seasoned and seasoned. I've only had it a few days, but I didn't think I'd have to ruin so many corn bread sticks.

    Any hope for this???

    Debie
    Yes, there's hope! I had the same problem with mine, and am running a MasterCook search for you right now to find how I fixed it . . . stay tuned.

    OK; back again. I bought 3 of those Lodge Logic pre-seasoned pans so that I could bake a whole recipe at once (and I found them dirt-cheap!). Below is the recipe I used, with the notes I made after trying it in my cornbread-stick pans. I need to make the muffins again to refine the instructions, or you can do it yourself--I don't think it'll be hard. Maybe someone else will pipe in, too, but here you go:

    * Exported from MasterCook *

    Sweet Corn Muffins

    Recipe By :A "wow!" muffin--excellent! (Not a traditional cornbread, but very sweet.)
    Serving Size : 12
    Categories : Bread, Quick Entertaining
    Family Meal (Simple) Five-Star Favorite
    Make Ahead/NO last-min prep

    Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour -- or about 6 3/4 ounces per 1 1/2 cups needed
    3/4 cup granulated sugar
    1/2 cup yellow cornmeal
    2 teaspoons baking powder
    1/4 teaspoon salt

    2/3 cup plain low-fat yogurt
    1/4 cup butter -- melted
    3 tablespoons skim milk
    1 large egg -- lightly beaten

    2 tablespoons turbinado sugar -- optional (see Notes)

    *** SEE "NOTES" BEFORE MAKING AGAIN. ***

    DO-AHEAD STEPS: Measure and mix the dry ingredients; set aside. Pull out
    the cast-iron muffin pans. Combine wet ingredients (except butter); cover
    and refrigerate. Measure out butter; place into microwave-safe bowl and
    either cover and refrigerate, or let it sit in the microwave.

    Preheat oven to 375 degrees. If using cast-iron corn-muffin pans, place
    pans into oven to preheat, or the corn-muffin sticks won't brown.

    Begin melting the butter.

    Lightly spoon flour into dry measuring cups; level with a knife. Combine
    flour, granulated sugar, cornmeal, baking powder, and salt in a medium
    bowl, stirring with a whisk. Make a well in center of mixture. Combine
    yogurt, melted butter, milk, and egg, stirring with a whisk; add to flour
    mixture, stirring just until moist.

    FOR STANDARD MUFFINS: Place paper liners in muffin cups or spray the cups
    with oil. Divide the batter evenly among cups. Sprinkle batter evenly with
    turbinado sugar, if desired. Bake at 375 degrees for 20 minutes or until a
    wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean. Cool on a wire rack.

    FOR CORNBREAD STICKS: Using stainless-steel scoop and preheated cast-iron
    pans, add about 1 tablespoon batter per 1/3 of each corn stick; go around
    corn-stick molds 3 times to add batter down each corn stick (top, middle,
    center) to minimize hand-spreading (which is kind of a pain). Spread with
    wet finger if needed; bake till medium brown. (NOTE: When muffins are
    done, pull out oven shelf slowly. The loaded, slick cast-iron muffin pans
    like to slide, and you don't need them hitting the floor.) Turn out of
    pans to cool on rack.

    Description:
    "More sweet and breakfast-y than cornbread-like, and great."
    Source:
    "Cooking Light Annual Recipes 2008"
    S(Internet Address):
    ""
    Yield:
    "12 muffins"
    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 184 Calories; 5g Fat (22.9%
    calories from fat); 4g Protein; 32g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber; 29mg
    Cholesterol; 183mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1 Grain(Starch); 0 Lean Meat; 0
    Non-Fat Milk; 1 Fat; 1 Other Carbohydrates.

    Serving Ideas : After baking, cool completely, place in a zip-top plastic bag, and refrigerate or freeze a batch of these simple muffins. To reheat, just place them in a microwave at HIGH for 15 seconds if refrigerated, 30 seconds if frozen. You can pair one with a carton of yogurt or a hard-cooked egg for an easy breakfast on the run.

    NOTES : 12-muffin recipe makes up to 21 corn sticks, or 14 sticks
    plus 3 or more regular muffins.

    Muffins are nicely sweet w/o added sugar as garnish; that
    sugar just makes them extra-special. Don't use sugar
    garnish for cornbread sticks, b/c the sugar will end up on
    the bottom anyway.

    RECIPE CHANGES NEEDED: The last time I made these, I
    preheated the corn-stick pans. However, the batter is so
    thick that spreading it into the hot pans was very
    difficult. Also, they need 2 1/2 scoops or so per pan, not
    3; I began running out of batter as I reached the last
    cornstick pan and filled it. And the muffins turned out
    quite tough; I don't know if I overbeat them (not likely),
    or if it mattered that the first ones began baking right
    there on the counter (in the hot pans) before I could get
    all the cavities filled and smoothed out. Therefore, since
    I consulted the CLBB, I'll double the skim-milk amount. The
    batter MUST pour into the pans or seek its own level
    (fairly readily, at least) when scooped into them. After
    seeing how that works, I'll edit the instructions further.
    Last edited by testkitchen45; 09-05-2008 at 12:54 PM. Reason: ETA: Add recipe and hints. Hope they help! :-)
    If you're afraid of butter, use cream. ~~ Julia Child

    As you cook, you enjoy omniscience about food that no amount of label reading can match. Having retaken control of the meal from the food scientists, you know exactly what is in it. (Unless you start w/cream of mushroom soup, in which case all bets are off.) To reclaim control over one's food, to take it back from industry & science, is no small thing; indeed, in our time, cooking from scratch qualifies as subversive. ~~ Michael Pollan

  3. #3
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    Do you grease the pan and put it into the oven to get good and sizzlin' hot before pouring in the batter?

    I've only ever used cast iron to cook cornbread, but not the special pans with the cob shapes. Still, even with a seasoned pan you still have to grease it, and putting batter into a hothothot pan seems essential to me -- I've never done it any other way.
    The Blog is open again!
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    "If God had meant for corn bread to have sugar in it, he'd have called it cake." -- Mark Twain

  4. #4
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    I have one I bought at a thrift store. So far I haven't had a problem. I do preheat it with a smear of Crisco in each section before I add the a batter. Just before the batter goes in I use a pastry brush to get the melted Crisco in every kernel. Also, I put the pan on a sheet pan in case of spills. HTH.
    Beth

  5. #5
    Beth - perhaps mine just isn't "used" enough? I preheat and oil before filling, but I've only used it three times. Prior to that I heated, oiled, heated, cleaned - that cycle three times. I was hoping that would be enough seasoning.

    Testkitchen - thanks for the recipe! I've got some time today, maybe I'll do a run with your recipe and comments.
    Never take life seriously. Nobody gets out alive anyway.

  6. #6
    I've found that solid shortenings do a better job of greasing a pan so that it is nonstick rather than liquid oils. I use Crisco like Beth mentionned and never have a problem.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chefzhat View Post
    Testkitchen - thanks for the recipe! I've got some time today, maybe I'll do a run with your recipe and comments.
    OK. At the time I made all those recipe comments, I don't think I had tried Pam Baking spray yet, for anything. Wonder if that'd work? Seems much easier than Crisco. I like Pam Baking now for my Bundt pans that have all the little design grooves (groovy pans, hey ); want to give that a try?
    If you're afraid of butter, use cream. ~~ Julia Child

    As you cook, you enjoy omniscience about food that no amount of label reading can match. Having retaken control of the meal from the food scientists, you know exactly what is in it. (Unless you start w/cream of mushroom soup, in which case all bets are off.) To reclaim control over one's food, to take it back from industry & science, is no small thing; indeed, in our time, cooking from scratch qualifies as subversive. ~~ Michael Pollan

  8. #8
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    With the corn stick pans it is a matter of use and heavy greasing and preheating. I use a solid fat (coconut oil) on my pans and put them in the oven as soon as I turn it on. I also heat it to 25 above the necessary temp to allow for heat loss when removing the pan to fill and then reduce the temp when putting in the filled pan.

    It is better to use a solid fat in these pans but you should melt it and brush it on to make sure you get all the nooks and crannies.
    Well-behaved women seldom make history!

  9. #9
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    I have always wondered why the corn stick pans come with uneven number of sticks. You get 7 or 9 - never an even number. I have never found an explanation.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by madpots View Post
    I have always wondered why the corn stick pans come with uneven number of sticks. You get 7 or 9 - never an even number. I have never found an explanation.
    I actually wrote to a woman who was suppose to know these things about cooking and traditions and such (she has something to do with the timeline of food website). Her reply to me was that she thought it had something to do with luck. Not a very satisfactory answer though.
    Well-behaved women seldom make history!

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