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Thread: Does boneless ribeye roast=boneless primerib roast?

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Does boneless ribeye roast=boneless primerib roast?

    I'm perusing the grocery store flyers and trying to figure out whether a boneless prime rib roast is the same thing as a boneless ribeye roast - one store has ribeye roast for $5.99/lb, and two others have prime rib from $7.99-9.99. Which should I go for? And while I'm at it, does anyone have any foolproof recipes for prime rib?
    The motive power of democracy is love. ~ Henri Bergson

  2. #2
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    We love AB's dry aged rib roast

    While it makes for a more flavorful roast, you don't have to do the dry age process (especially if you don't have plenty of days in advance and trust/know your fridge temperature). Just follow his advice for the reverse sear (start at a low temp, then finish at 500 to get the crust). A good probe thermometer is critical to get the desired doneness.

    Make sure to look for good marbling in the roast you buy. That's going to be a key factor to a juicy, tender, tasty end product.

    Michelle

  3. #3
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    Prime rib does come the same area as the rib-eye. Choose bone-in for more flavor, boneless for easier carving, and the price will be determined by which end of the rib area the roast is cut from.

    I have a 7 rib, 14.5 pound roast for Christmas Eve. I will use olive oil and no-salt Montreal steak seasoning as a rub. I will also be doing the 500 method.

    We like the bone-in as DH will grill the bones on Friday. We roast the meat just shy of medium rare and then grill the bones to medium...very, very tasty leftovers.
    Well-behaved women seldom make history!

  4. #4
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    Prime rib is like apples to rib-eye's oranges. Prime refers to the quality or grade of meat, whereas rib-eye is where on the beast it came from. I don't think I've ever seen prime roasts in the market and my understanding is they're basically only sold to restaurants. $9.99 is a fantastic price if it is actually prime beef. My suspicious self guesses it's really just a rib roast. A bone-in rib-eye roast can definitely be used for a beautiful roast beef, and the bones will make for great gnawing.
    Lorien

  5. #5
    I second everything mkc said. I've made that recipe a dozen times and it's come perfect every time.

    As for the names in the grocery store, I've often wondered if the standing rib roast (which is the non-prime name for 'prime rib', the way I understand it) is the same as the ribeye roasts.

    I can usually find choice (one grade below prime) standing rib roasts for under $4/lb. at a grocery store around Christmas.

  6. #6
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    Thanks for your replies - I bought a 4.5 lb boneless ribeye roast this morning. I don't know what grade it was, but a sign behind the counter said that their meat was better than Walmart's , so it should be fine. The butcher did say it was cut from the small end of the rib, so that's a bonus. AB's recipe looks good, but I don't have a 16" azalea pot lying around, so I think I'll go with the CI recipe, using Montreal steak seasoning as a rub (thanks for the idea, sneezles!)
    The motive power of democracy is love. ~ Henri Bergson

  7. #7
    Oh, yeah... you can ignore the pottery! If you watch the Good Eats episodes, he explains that's an option for people with awful, uneven-heating ovens.

    The grocery stores usually carry Select meats. Next up is Choice (Costco meats are all or mostly choice, I think), then Prime, which is usually restaurants or special order.

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