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Thread: Burned Teflon?

  1. #1
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    Burned Teflon?

    My DH left a telfon pan in the broiler and it caught fire this evening. Fire's out, smoke has cleared and everything's okay - except for the nasty smell from the teflon. I know teflon fumes are bad but how bad?? - bad like we should move out of the house temporarily or just not be on the first floor (the basement and 2nd story do not smell). And any suggestions on how to get rid of the teflon smell? We've left the back door open and sprinkled some baking soda out but there has to be something more we can do right? Any suggestions? Thank you!

  2. #2
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    I'm no expert, but I would think that the amount of teflon on a pan is very little, not enough to worry about. If a burnt pan could do you any harm, I doubt they could sell teflon pans as it's not unheard of for someone to burn a pan!

    If your OH is prone to burning pans, I suggest replacing the burnt one with a titanium coated non-stick pan. My wife is prone to burning things, I got fed up of replacing non-stick pans once a year so I forked out and got a titanium one which so far she hasn't managed to destroy. The nonstick is guaranteed for 25 years so I'm optimistic that this will survive longer than usual.

    As regards getting rid of the smell - open windows and spray air-fresheners are about the best you can do. Spray ones should absorb the nasties into the liquid which will fall to the ground.

    I once set fire to my oven. It had a broiler in (a grill in the UK). I had been making fireworks and had left a pound of gunpowder to dry in it over the weekend on a melamine plate, and gone away. I came back on Sunday night, forgot the gunpowder, and whacked the broiler on high to cook some naan bread. Next thing, there's a whoosh noise from the oven and a foot-diameter purple fireball came shooting out of the oven vent. It melted the plastic coating on a shelf, and created more smoke than you would believe. My 2 bedroom apartment was so full of smoke that you couldn't see more than a foot. The smoke was also full of ammonia, the melamine plate was burnt to a crisp and the plastic nasties had vaporised. Fortunately I always keep a gas mask handy in case of fire, so I popped that on and opened all the windows. It was late at night mercifully, if anyone had been passing they'd have seen smoke pouring from my windows and called the fire engines and I'd have had a lot of explaining to do to the police! it took about 3 hours for the smoke to disappear completely and it smelt for a couple of days. After such a lucky escape, I've never made fireworks since!
    Has anyone seen reality? I'm sure it was there a minute ago

  3. #3
    I always keep a spray bottle on my counter, next to my stove, it's filled with 1 part vinegar and 1 part water and I use it whenever something burns or when I cook curried anything. I spray everywhere, on the carpet, curtain, couch included, open the windows for half an hour and it works wonderfully. It even took care of the garlic pickle smell! I also burn candles and that helps too.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny C View Post
    I once set fire to my oven. It had a broiler in (a grill in the UK). I had been making fireworks and had left a pound of gunpowder to dry in it over the weekend on a melamine plate, and gone away. I came back on Sunday night, forgot the gunpowder, and whacked the broiler on high to cook some naan bread. Next thing, there's a whoosh noise from the oven and a foot-diameter purple fireball came shooting out of the oven vent. It melted the plastic coating on a shelf, and created more smoke than you would believe. My 2 bedroom apartment was so full of smoke that you couldn't see more than a foot. The smoke was also full of ammonia, the melamine plate was burnt to a crisp and the plastic nasties had vaporised. Fortunately I always keep a gas mask handy in case of fire, so I popped that on and opened all the windows. It was late at night mercifully, if anyone had been passing they'd have seen smoke pouring from my windows and called the fire engines and I'd have had a lot of explaining to do to the police! it took about 3 hours for the smoke to disappear completely and it smelt for a couple of days. After such a lucky escape, I've never made fireworks since!
    Even though I'm sure it was very frightening at the time, that's definitely a story to dine out on, Johnny.

    Very funny!

    Bob

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobmark226 View Post
    Even though I'm sure it was very frightening at the time, that's definitely a story to dine out on, Johnny.

    Very funny!

    Bob
    So very funny that I have tea coming out my nostrils!
    Well-behaved women seldom make history!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by sneezles View Post
    So very funny that I have tea coming out my nostrils!
    I was fortunate that I read Bob's response first so I swallowed my coffee before I read the story. That's hilarious!


    "Life isn't about finding yourself. Life is about creating yourself" ~ George Bernard Shaw


  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by sneezles View Post
    So very funny that I have tea coming out my nostrils!
    Are you running out to buy a gas mask, too?

    The worst I ever did was to fall asleep when making a pork and caraway stew where the liquid completely simmered away. I'm sure you can imagine what burned caraway smells like!

    Bob

  8. #8
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    Burnt caraway sounds absolutely vile!

    My escapade was over so quick I didn't have time to be frightened by the fireball, what was worrying was the risk of someone calling the fire people as they would automatically notify the police.

    Over here in the UK firearm licensing is VERY strict. This was many years ago, but still at a time when the IRA were active in London. If you're caught making anything like gunpowder, the bomb squad are called out, your place is taken to bits, you get interviewed by the terrorist squad and it makes the national newspapers. That never stopped us making pipe bombs or fireworks at college - but then the police are a bit more lenient as that's one of those daft things kids do at college.
    Has anyone seen reality? I'm sure it was there a minute ago

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