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Thread: Dessert Shots and Mini Desserts

  1. #1
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    Dessert Shots and Mini Desserts

    Every year at Thanksgiving, I am slicing slivers of pie and cutting tiny servings of this and that dessert so at least half of the guests can have a taste of everything rather than one full dessert. I was looking at glassware recently and decided I would do at least some of the desserts in shot glasses and start with mini-portions. I bought some additional shot glasses and have some demitasse spoons.

    Not to decide what to make --I may do little tartlets for the pies as well. I haven't decided how far I will take the idea because I always see some new recipes I want to try this time of year and having everyone over is usually the best time to make them. My niece devours pumpkin pie, so I think at least that will have to be done in the usual size. But as for the other ideas....

    Chocolate mousse is an obvious and definite choice. I was thinking of pecan pie tartlets, a cranberry something, a pumpkin something and either mini apple pies, apple pie wontons or egg rolls (Gale Gand has an egg roll version, but it calls for frying at the last minute. I may try baking one, but if I have to go to pie dough or puff pastry, it won't have the same feel).

    Have any of you tried dessert shots? What worked well in tiny glasses and what was better in the original form? Any other mini dessert ideas for the holidays?

  2. #2
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    I've been to restaurant where they served Desserts Shots.

    Tiramisu would be one I would make.

    No-bake cheesecake would be another one.

    They look so fancy.
    Helene

    ''In cooking, as in all the arts, simplicity is the sign of perfection.''
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  3. #3
    Hi all. I'm new to this website and I was wondering if the nutritional informations at the end of each recipe refer to the whole cake(for example) or to the single serving.
    Thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy777 View Post
    Hi all. I'm new to this website and I was wondering if the nutritional informations at the end of each recipe refer to the whole cake(for example) or to the single serving.
    Thanks
    If you mean the bulletin board it can vary depending on who posted it and who did the calculations. If you mean the Cooking Light library of recipes that is per serving.


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  5. #5
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    I know we've had threads about CL's mini desserts from a few years ago--I remember some chocolate, pecan, and other tartlets from an older issue of CL--try a search for mini desserts.

    Re: Dessert Shots--The King Arthur Flour catalog has been profiling dessert shots for a while, too. I think most of them might feature some of their packaged mousses and fillings, but here are some of their ideas from their website:

    King Arthur Flour--Dessert Shot Parfaits

    Petite parfaits ("dessert shots") are a lovely, light way to end a festive dinner. Only a few bites big, they're just enough to satisfy everyone's sweet tooth.

    Parfaits by definition include multiple layers, for pleasing contrasts in flavor and texture. Try the following elements:
    *Base layer: cookie or biscotti crumbs; tiny cake cubes; brownie crumbles.
    *Cream layer: flavored mousse; pastry cream; custard; pudding; whipped cream.
    *Garnishes: berries; chopped nuts; shaved chocolate; coconut.

    Rather than provide a recipe, here are some building-block ideas. Mix and match as you please to create what sounds best to you.
    *Key lime: graham cracker crumbs and lime-flavored pudding or mousse.
    *Harvest: gingerbread cookie crumbs and pumpkin mousse.
    *Strawberries and cream: Vanilla shortbread crumbs with a lemon curd/whipped cream mixture.
    *Black Forest: brownie crumbles with cherry pie filling, vanilla pudding, whipped cream, and chocolate shavings.
    *Tropical: White cake cubes with pastry cream, sliced banana, and toasted coconut.

    Following is a recipe for our favorite, easy, all-purpose pastry cream.
    Ingredients View by: Volume Weight

    * 1 small box (about 3/4 ounces) vanilla instant pudding mix
    * 1 cup cold milk
    * 1 cup heavy cream
    * 2 teaspoons vanilla extract

    * 3.4 ounces vanilla instant pudding mix
    * 8 ounces cold milk
    * 8 ounces heavy cream
    * 2 teaspoons vanilla extract

    Directions

    1) Prepare the instant pudding according to the package directions, using milk and cream instead of just milk.

    2) Stir in the vanilla.

    3) Refrigerate til ready to use.
    I'm a Tar Heel born, I'm a Tar Heel bred.....

  6. #6
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    I would imagine that this recipe could be somehow modified to work in a mini-serving vessel. I can attest that it is one of the absolute best desserts I have ever eaten


    FoodNetwork.com
    Pumpkin Banana Mousse Tart

    2002 Barefoot Contessa Family Style, All rights reserved

    Prep Time:
    30 min
    Inactive Prep Time:
    2 hr 30 min
    Cook Time:
    20 min

    Level:
    Easy

    Serves:
    10 servings

    Ingredients
    For the crust:

    * 2 cups graham cracker crumbs (14 crackers)
    * 1/3 cup sugar
    * 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    * 1/4 pound (1 stick) unsalted butter, melted

    For the filling:

    * 1/2 cup half-and-half
    * 1 (15-ounce) can pumpkin puree
    * 1 cup light brown sugar, lightly packed
    * 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
    * 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    * 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
    * 3 extra-large egg yolks
    * 1 package (2 teaspoons) unflavored gelatin
    * 1 ripe banana, finely mashed
    * 1 teaspoon grated orange zest
    * 1/2 cup cold heavy cream
    * 2 tablespoons sugar

    For the decoration:

    * 1 cup (1/2 pint) cold heavy cream
    * 1/4 cup sugar
    * 1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
    * Orange zest, optional

    Directions

    Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

    Combine the graham cracker crumbs, sugar, cinnamon, and melted butter in a bowl and mix well. Pour into an 11-inch tart pan with a removable bottom and press evenly into the sides and then the bottom. Bake for 10 minutes and then cool to room temperature.

    For the filling, heat the half-and-half, pumpkin, brown sugar, salt, cinnamon, and nutmeg in a heat-proof bowl set over a pan of simmering water until hot, about 5 minutes. Whisk the egg yolks in another bowl, stir some of the hot pumpkin into the egg yolks to heat them, then pour the egg-pumpkin mixture back into the double boiler and stir well. Heat the mixture over the simmering water for another 4 to 5 minutes, until it begins to thicken, stirring constantly. You don't want the eggs to scramble. Remove from the heat.

    Dissolve the gelatin in 1/4 cup cold water. Add the dissolved gelatin, banana, and orange zest to the pumpkin mixture and mix well. Set aside to cool.

    Whip the heavy cream in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with a whisk attachment until soft peaks form. Add the sugar and continue to whisk until you have firm peaks. Carefully fold the whipped cream into the pumpkin mixture and pour it into the cooled tart shell. Chill for 2 hours or overnight.

    For the decoration, whip the heavy cream in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the whisk attachment until soft peaks form. Add the sugar and vanilla and continue to whisk until you have firm peaks. Pipe or spoon the whipped cream decoratively on the tart and sprinkle, if desired, with orange zest. Serve chilled.

    Printed from FoodNetwork.com on Mon Oct 19 2009

    © 2009 Scripps Networks, LLC. All Rights Reserved
    Advertisement will not be printed
    - Josie


  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beth View Post
    Have any of you tried dessert shots? What worked well in tiny glasses and what was better in the original form? Any other mini dessert ideas for the holidays?


    Carrabba's serves these. I've had several of them and I think I like the tiramisu the best.

    I took this picture with my cell phone a year ago. I think the tiramisu is the second one from the left.


  8. #8
    I found a recipe for panna cotta done in shots glasses. Maybe you could add pumpkin to it for a seasonal flavor, or layer it. I also found one for Bostini Cream Pie.

    Panna Cotta Shots

    Prep and cook time: About 35 minutes, plus at least 3 hours to chill

    Makes: 12 shots

    6 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon sugar
    1 1/2 teaspoons unflavored gelatin
    1 1/2 cups whipping cream
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    1/2 cup flavored syrup or liqueur (one flavor or four different ones;
    see notes)

    1. In a 1- to 1 1/2-quart pan, mix 6 tablespoons sugar and 1 teaspoon gelatin. Stir in whipping cream; let stand to soften gelatin, 1 to 2 minutes.

    2. Stir cream mixture over medium heat until sugar and gelatin are completely dissolved and mixture feels smooth, 3 to 4 minutes. Pour into a 2- to 4-cup glass measure and stir in vanilla. Let mixture stand until just warm, stirring occasionally, 10 to 15 minutes. Pour into 12 shot glasses (3- to 4-tablespoon size). Chill until firm, 1 1/2 to 2 hours.

    3. When panna cotta is firm, make toppings: In a 1- to 2-quart pan, mix remaining 1 teaspoon sugar and 1/2 teaspoon gelatin. Add 1/4 cup water; let stand 1 minute. Stir over high heat until mixture is simmering, 1 to 2 minutes. If making only one flavor, stir flavored syrup or liqueur into mixture; if making four, pour gelatin mixture equally into four small bowls and stir 2 tablespoons syrup or liqueur into mixture in each bowl. Let cool to room temperature, 2 to 5 minutes.

    4. Spoon about 1/4 inch of the cool topping over each firm panna cotta shot. Chill until firm, at least 1 1/2 hours.

    Notes: To top the panna cotta, choose brightly colored liqueurs or flavored syrups such as blue curacao, creme de menthe, framboise, cassis, pomegranate, berry, mango, mandarin orange, or coffee. Plano also serves the panna cotta in larger martini glasses on occasion, for a full-size dessert. You can assemble either form up to 2 days ahead; chill airtight.

    Per shot: 142 cal., 58% (83 cal.) from fat; 0.9 g protein; 9.2 g fat (5.8 g sat.); 11 g carbo (0 g fiber); 11 mg sodium; 33 mg chol.

    Bostini Cream Pie

    makes 8 generous servings
    Custard:
    3/4 cup whole milk
    2 3/4 tablespoons cornstarch
    1 whole egg, beaten
    9 egg yolks, beaten
    3 3/4 cups heavy whipping cream
    1/2 vanilla bean
    1/2 cup + 1 tablespoon sugar

    Chiffon Cake:
    1 1/2 cups cake flour
    3/4 cup superfine sugar
    1 1/3 teaspoons baking powder
    1/3 teaspoon salt
    1/3 cup canola oil
    1/3 cup beaten egg yolks (3 to 4 yolks)
    3/4 cup fresh orange juice
    1 1/2 tablespoons grated orange zest
    1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
    1 cup egg whites (about 8 large)
    1 teaspoon cream of tartar

    Chocolate Glaze:
    8 ounces semi or bittersweet chocolate
    8 ounces unsalted butter


    To prepare the custard:

    Combine the milk and cornstarch in a bowl; blend until smooth. Whisk in the whole egg and yolks, beating until smooth. Combine the cream, vanilla bean and sugar in a saucepan and carefully bring to a boil. When the mixture just boils, whisk a ladleful into the egg mixture to temper it, then whisk this back into the cream mixture. Cook, stirring constantly, until the mixture is thick enough to coat the back of a spoon. Strain the custard and pour into 8 large custard cups. Refrigerate to chill.

    To prepare the chiffon cakes:

    Preheat the oven to 325°F. Spray 8 molds with nonstick cooking spray. You may use 7-ounce custard cups, ovenproof wide mugs or even large foil cups. Whatever you use should be the same size as the custard cups.

    Sift the cake flour, sugar, baking powder and salt into a large bowl. Add the oil, egg yolks, orange juice, zest and vanilla. Stir until smooth, but do not overbeat.

    Beat the egg whites until frothy. Add the cream of tartar and beat until soft peaks form. Gently fold the beaten whites into the orange batter. Fill the sprayed molds nearly to the top with the batter.

    Bake approximately 25 minutes, until the cakes bounce back when lightly pressed with your fingertip. Do not overbake. Remove from the oven and let cool on a wire rack. When completely cool, remove the cakes from the molds. Cover the cakes to keep them moist.

    To prepare the glaze:

    Chop the chocolate into small pieces. Place the butter in a saucepan and heat until it is just about to bubble. Remove from the heat; add the chocolate and stir to melt. Pour through a strainer and keep warm.

    To assemble:

    Cut a thin slice from the top of each cake to create a flat surface. Place a cake flat-side down on top of each custard. Cover the tops with warm chocolate glaze. Serve immediately.
    All That's Left Are The Crumbs

    "You can never do a kindness too soon, because you never know how soon it will be too late"

    "Great minds talk about ideas; small minds talk about people" - Eleanor Roosevelt

  9. #9
    Another one just came to mind since I was reading the November Gourmet last night. In this issue they have a recipe for Cafe Au Lait Puddings which look great. It serves four but they are in bigger glasses, so you could probably get eight or just increase the recipe. I couldn't see the recipe on the website (no big surprise there) but let me know if you would like it and I will type it for you - it doesn't have a lot of ingredients and looks like it goes together quickly.
    All That's Left Are The Crumbs

    "You can never do a kindness too soon, because you never know how soon it will be too late"

    "Great minds talk about ideas; small minds talk about people" - Eleanor Roosevelt

  10. #10
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    Check out Gale Gand's book "Just a Bite". If they don't have it at you library, Beth, you can borrow mine! Its chock full of ideas.

  11. #11
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    I have Just a Bite and have been looking at it. There are a number of things in there I would like to make as well of some ideas I'd like to try (should I practice or just go with it).

    I can rule out cookies and save those for Christmas, but I'm still having a hard time narrowing it down. I'm also trying to decide how many different minis I should do and how many of each kind to make.

    Josie, sounds good, but my sister claims a banana allergy and her daughter devours pumpkin pie. My dad also has to have some or it isn't Thanksgiving. I think that is one thing we will have to leave alone for now.

    Tiramisu would be good -- also thinking about pumpkin cheesecake shots, mini cranberry upside down cakes, mini pecan pies, chocolate mousse shots and the obligatory pumpkin pie. If my sister brings a pecan pie, I will make the minis fudge pecan and make my brother happy. The creme brulee spoons would be fun too, but that gets into the how many different kinds and how many of each.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gecko View Post
    Another one just came to mind since I was reading the November Gourmet last night. In this issue they have a recipe for Cafe Au Lait Puddings which look great.
    I like this one too and DH and I would like it even if not if part of Thanksgiving dinner. I have gotten Gourmet off and on and am not sure if I got this one. If I don't have it I may ask you to post it. Thanks.

    I like the Bostoni Cream Pie too.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Beth View Post
    I like this one too and DH and I would like it even if not if part of Thanksgiving dinner. I have gotten Gourmet off and on and am not sure if I got this one. If I don't have it I may ask you to post it. Thanks.

    I like the Bostoni Cream Pie too.
    Sure, just let me know if you don't have it and I'd be happy to post it for you.
    All That's Left Are The Crumbs

    "You can never do a kindness too soon, because you never know how soon it will be too late"

    "Great minds talk about ideas; small minds talk about people" - Eleanor Roosevelt

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beth View Post

    Tiramisu would be good -- also thinking about pumpkin cheesecake shots, mini cranberry upside down cakes, mini pecan pies, chocolate mousse shots and the obligatory pumpkin pie.
    I suddenly remembered a really nice pumpkin tiramisù I picked up off the BB a year or two ago. Anyone remember that one?
    Happiness is not a goal, it is a byproduct. - Eleanor Roosevelt

  15. #15
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    Last month a friend and I made pie lollipops. When we ran out of sticks, we just made a bunch of them without the sticks. They are a great bite-sized dessert. We made three fillings: apple, blueberry, and peach.
    *******************
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  16. #16
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    The caramel apple parfaits would work as shots as well. Just make the circles smaller and cut the apples into smaller pieces.
    Democrats are Sexy. Who has ever heard of a good piece of elephant?

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canice View Post
    I suddenly remembered a really nice pumpkin tiramisù I picked up off the BB a year or two ago. Anyone remember that one?
    That sounds good. Ya know, as much fun as I'm having volunteering this year, I think I should stay home and cook.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by PattiA View Post
    Last month a friend and I made pie lollipops. When we ran out of sticks, we just made a bunch of them without the sticks. They are a great bite-sized dessert. We made three fillings: apple, blueberry, and peach.
    Those are really cute! So how many desserts is too many? This one could go with Christmas cookies -- if I had to wait.

    ETA -- I just looked at the caramel apple parfaits and that looks good too. I want to make every dessert in miniature right now!

  19. #19
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    I would figure 2 - 4 desserts per person if they are all minature.
    Democrats are Sexy. Who has ever heard of a good piece of elephant?

  20. #20
    Seasons 52 does the shot glass type desserts you are discussing. We love their carrot cake and key lime pie. It's just the right size for a little after dinner nibble.

  21. #21
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    Last year for Thanksgiving, I made little vanilla bean creme brulee's. I found some small oven proof ramekin's at Target that were the perfect size. I would say that they were a four bite size.

    I love the idea of several mini desserts!

  22. #22
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    Carrot Cake in a shot glass! How cute! I love carrot cake. If we don't do that, DH can make me one for my birthday a couple of weeks later.

    I am not sure how many people we will have this year -- probably 10 to 16 and I'm guessing 15 or 16. Of those, 4 are kids who may not want any of the minis. I have 12 of 3 different styles of shot glasses I am thinking of using. Mini tarts or cakes, apple wonton or eggrolls, and creme brulee spoons would not need glasses and all but the spoons would be easy to send leftovers to share with the ladies at my mom's place or with guests. I am going to have to weed out some choices -- maybe save them for New Year's.

  23. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Beth View Post
    Carrot Cake in a shot glass! How cute! I love carrot cake. If we don't do that, DH can make me one for my birthday a couple of weeks later.

    How would you bake it?
    newcook

  24. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Beth View Post
    Every year at Thanksgiving, I am slicing slivers of pie and cutting tiny servings of this and that dessert so at least half of the guests can have a taste of everything rather than one full dessert

    Oh Great Multi-Talented Contributing Forum sista ! I bow down and know your plating dilemma because it was mine for years!

    My years of stressful dessert plating for a guest list of over 6 is over!

    Desserts are now planned that do NOT involve cutting, portioning or scooping individual desserts at plating time. Everything is pre-portioned, ready to go at serving time. Only thing I do is top with sauces (pre-made -warmed in microwave at plating time), others in plastic squeeze bottle for zig-zagging over desserts (eg:chocolate sauce). Pre-toasted compatible nuts or coconut covered and set aside.

    The solution? Hands down, mini-cheesecakes has been the biggest stress reducer and hit of any party I've ever hosted.



    and


    I use a gingersnap crust for the pumpkin cheesecakes, served with warm caramel sauce (jarred ready to warm in microwave) and topped with toasted broken pecans.

    THe mini-cheesecake pans are great for piping pumpkin mousse (again, gingersnap crust base is terrific) instead of cheesecakes. Or use the regular mini-cheesecake pan for baking petit fours.

    I also make "Twinkies" in this pan:
    and fill with buttercreams and mousses.

    (Albeit larger desserts but easily eaten out of hand; pretty on a serving tray with doily.)

    Chocolate (drop dead delicious couverture please) chunks served with port in mini-glasses is terrific also.

    Small balls of ice cream (using ice cream scoop) rolled in chopped nuts, kept in freezer - plunk a ball next to warmed cake or mini-tartlet:


    I usually make an almond short crust for the mini-tartlet pans above. Pat firmly; bake til golden. Cool. Fill 1/3 of the cases with tangy lemon curd, another 1/3 filled with smooth and creamy ganache and garnished with gold leaf and remainder filled with any last minute filling I decide to make.

    Brandy balls is another I've heard folks talk about (those have liquor), but I've never made them.

    And as we all know, cookie platters are always popular, especially at holiday time when you cut holiday compatible shapes.


    Do as much as you can prior to your guests" arrival and you'll be rewarded with stressfree entertaining (as last minute errors [over-toasting the nuts while distracted] won't occur).

    If I think up more, I'll post more.

    (Sorry for the long post)

    Dolores
    "we can't go 'round measuring our goodness by what we don't do, by what we deny ourselves, what we resist and who we exclude...
    we've got to measure goodness by what we embrace, what we create, and who we include."
    Pierre Henri in Chocolat
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beth View Post
    That sounds good. Ya know, as much fun as I'm having volunteering this year, I think I should stay home and cook.
    Found it! From BA, November 2006. Link

    BTW, guess who the "someone" was who posted it?
    Happiness is not a goal, it is a byproduct. - Eleanor Roosevelt

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by newcook View Post
    How would you bake it?
    Shots with cake or other cooked things are cooked and then layered. In the case of carrot cake, you would bake a small recipe of cake and layer it in the glasses with a cream cheese frosting -- nuts and grated carrots in the layers or for garnish optional. At least that's how I would do it.

    Dolores, thanks for the ideas. Yes, 36 glasses to wash could be a pain, but it's not something I'd do often. I also have 2 dishwashers now and can probably fit all the minis in the top and a small item rack in the bottom. But I may limit the glasses to just a couple of the selections because several of the minis wouldn't use them -- less washing after diner would be a plus.

    I think I can resist cookies and put them out at Christmas Eve when our traditional dessert a cookie tray. But I'm not sure how I will narrow down all the other ideas. Of course, Thanksgiving always has more than is needed. This will be no exception.

    ETA -- the ice cream balls might be a good thing for the kiddos in the crowd.

  27. #27
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    FWIW - If I was at your lovely dinner, I would try all the desserts. That is the point of the mini-servings, right?
    - Josie


  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by avariell View Post
    FWIW - If I was at your lovely dinner, I would try all the desserts. That is the point of the mini-servings, right?
    Well that would be my thinking, but the kids are picky and my dad is obsessing over his weight. My mom will forget what she has tried, so no telling there.

    And you'd certainly be welcome, but I'm guessing you will be with your sister and family or in new digs.

  29. #29
    Although not a traditional Thanksgiving flavor, I think that lemon meringue pie in shot glasses would be good too. I couldn;t find a recipe but it wouldn't be very hard to create.

    I also saw these Pumpkin-Meringue tartlets, and although they are not in a shot glass, thought they were cute.

    All That's Left Are The Crumbs

    "You can never do a kindness too soon, because you never know how soon it will be too late"

    "Great minds talk about ideas; small minds talk about people" - Eleanor Roosevelt

  30. #30
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    The Pumpkin Meringue Tartlets reminded me of these Pumpkin Chiffon Cup Pies I made for Thanksgiving 2007.
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