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Thread: what to do with parmesan cheese rinds?

  1. #1
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    what to do with parmesan cheese rinds?

    Hi! I bought a slice of parmesan cheese so I could grate it myself. When I cut off the rinds I just hated to throw them out so I threw them in a bag and they've been in my freezer for months b/c I'm not sure if/how I can use them. Or is it ok to just grate them also (I use my food processor to do it all up at one time and then keep the grated cheese in my freezer). I thought there might be some soup or sauce that I could make but I've had little luck finding ideas online--just lots of info. about how great they are but no real recipes.
    TIA for your help!
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  2. #2
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    You can throw them into any soup that might be good with Parmesan cheese grated on top so the flavors don't clash.

    I know that it is quite commonly used for Minestrone -- an obvious choice.
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  3. #3
    A co-worker gave me a recipe for minestrone that she had clipped that told you to simmer with the soup with a cheese rind. I have not made it yet, and I don't have the recipe with me, but if you send me an e-mail, I can send it to you.

    angela_regnier@hotmail.com

  4. #4
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    I toss them in my tomato sauces.

  5. #5
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    what Blaze said... I always toss a rind into the minestrone if I have one. keeps fine in the freezer.
    "If the world were a logical place, men would ride side saddle." Rita Mae Brown

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by AngelaM View Post
    A co-worker gave me a recipe for minestrone that she had clipped that told you to simmer with the soup with a cheese rind. I have not made it yet, and I don't have the recipe with me, but if you send me an e-mail, I can send it to you.

    ]
    You might want to remove your email from a public post as it is one of the ways that bots and hackers retrieve email. If you want someone to contact you off the Board, you can ask them to PM you -- or if you have put email contact in your preferences they can do that as well.

    I deliberately removed your email from the quote.
    Some days I pray for Silence, Some days I pray for Soul,
    Some days I just pray to the God of Sex and Drums and Rock 'N' Roll.

    Meatloaf

  7. #7
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    In addition to soup, I use them in simmered pan sauces for pasta, letting the bits of cheese melt off. The rinds themselves are not edible.

    As an aside, I never buy Parmesan at TJ's because the rind-to-paste ratio is ridiculous.
    Happiness is not a goal, it is a byproduct. - Eleanor Roosevelt

  8. #8
    I have a microplane, and I grate the rinds the same way I grate the rest of the cheese.

    Am I committing a major cooking faux pas?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by sparrowgrass View Post
    I have a microplane, and I grate the rinds the same way I grate the rest of the cheese.

    Am I committing a major cooking faux pas?
    I have thought about doing that too! And I remember reading that the rind is actually edible... have to find where... Is it really edible?
    Ana

  10. #10
    I just posted a soup from Cook's Illustrated on the February Soup Thread that uses a parmesan cheese rind for the vegetarian version. It's called White Bean Soup with Winter Vegetables. We both liked it a lot, and it made a big pot.

  11. #11
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    I suppose it depends how you define "edible". Virtually all rinds are edible in that they won't kill you, but might taste bad or have a terrible texture or add nothing to the enjoyment of the cheese.
    The rind protects the paste and help it develop to its desired taste and texture. When you slow simmer a Parmesan rind you get body and flavor in your broth and can discard the leathery remains. Until now I'd never heard of eating Parm rinds, but if it tastes good to you and you don't find the texture off, who's to say not to?
    Happiness is not a goal, it is a byproduct. - Eleanor Roosevelt

  12. #12
    When I use my Parm. rinds in a soup and it simmers a long time, it sometimes gets so soft that it partially dissolves. If it is not a really tough rind, I sometimes dice it up and add it back to the soup or puree it with a bit of the soup broth to add more texture and flavor to the soup. It works really well. The ones that never soften enough or the tough parts, I just trim off and toss.

    Karen

  13. #13
    It all tastes the same to me. The microplane turns it into a fluff, so no texture problems. Seems to me that parmesan rinds are just drier than the middles, and not different in flavor.

    I guess I won't turn in my apron just yet.

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