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Thread: ISO: Baked French Toast Casserole that is NOT SOGGY

  1. #1
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    ISO: Baked French Toast Casserole that is NOT SOGGY

    I have made several baked french toast casseroles over the years. BUT every one has been soggy. A few tasted really good but still soggy. Does anyone have a recipe for a casserole that isn't soggy once it's baked? I am having company in 2 weeks for the weekend and am hoping to make one. TIA!

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by Leonard View Post
    I have made several baked french toast casseroles over the years. BUT every one has been soggy. A few tasted really good but still soggy. Does anyone have a recipe for a casserole that isn't soggy once it's baked? I am having company in 2 weeks for the weekend and am hoping to make one. TIA!
    Why don't you give us a recipe and we can analyze. I usually have no problem but add extra time if not cooked through

  3. #3
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    Try the Creme Brulee French Toast that I make every year for my Sister's Christmas Day Brunch...here's a post from a few years back:

    Lightened Creme Brulee French Toast

    Recipe By : posted by gabbyh (gail)
    Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00
    Categories : Breakfast

    Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    1/2 cup unsalted butter
    1 cup packed brown sugar
    2 tablespoons corn syrup
    12 ozs Italian bread -- (3/4 of a one pound loaf)
    1 c egg beaters� 99% egg substitute
    1 lg egg
    1 1/2 cups fat free half-and-half
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    1/4 teaspoon salt

    In a small heavy saucepan melt butter with brown sugar and corn syrup over moderate heat, stirring, until smooth and pour into a 13- by 9- by 2-inch baking dish. Cut 1-inch thick slices from center portion of bread. Arrange bread slices in one layer in baking dish, squeezing them slightly to fit.

    In a bowl whisk together eggs, half-and-half, vanilla, and salt until combined well and pour evenly over bread. Chill bread mixture, covered, at least 8 hours and up to 1 day. (I have always made it the night before)

    Preheat oven to 350� F. and bring bread to room temperature.

    Bake bread mixture, uncovered, in middle of oven until puffed and edges are pale golden, 35 to 40 minutes.

    Serve hot French toast immediately.

    Makes 6 servings.

    It's really yummy and has never been soggy!

    ~Gail
    "I expect to pass through life but once.
    If, therefore, there be any kindness I can show or any good thing I can do any fellow being, let me do it now and not defer or neglect it, as I shall not pass this way again."
    -William Penn (1644-1718)

    ~~www.Nurse-Gail.com~~

  4. #4
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    I have made the Creme Brulee casserole and it had fabulous taste but again soggy. The others I've tried in the past, I tossed. I am hoping someone can post a link to one that wasn't soggy. I'd feel more secure serving a tried & true recipe to my guests rather than tinkering with one. Thanks for all your replies

  5. #5
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    Maybe it's more technique, the bread you are using, or the dish you are baking it in. Or perhaps you are letting it sit too long prior to serving? This CL recipe isn't remotely soggy. I have served it every Christmas brunch for the last 5 years.

    French Toast Soufflé
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  6. #6
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    Are you using stale bread or fresh?

    I make the Creme Brulee French Toast all the time and it has never been "soggy". I use challah bread, cube it and place the cubes on a tray. Then I let the cubes sit out all day to stale. This helps the bread to better absorb the custard ingredients. I put the pudding together in the evening and refrigerate overnight. Make sure to take it out of the frig about a half hour before you put it in the oven to get it to room temp, then bake. I always find I need to bake a bit longer than recipe recommends. Keep checking -- the bread pudding will be very puffy when it's done. And I always do the "knife test" (stick a knife into the pudding. If it comes out clean the pudding is ready) to make sure it's cooked through.
    Last edited by syzygy; 02-13-2011 at 12:10 PM.
    ~ ~ Leslie ~ ~

  7. #7
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    I made this baked french toast recipe this morning, first time making something like this:

    http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Baked-F...-2/Detail.aspx

    I read the "most helpful" reviews and decided to use 6 eggs, 2 cups cream, 2 tsp vanilla extract, 1/8 tsp cinnamon. I cut my bread in 1 inch slices and I think I was able to get 9 slices in a 9 x 13 glass dish. I dipped each slice in the mixture, both sides, placed in the dish, then poured the remaining liquid mixture in the dish. I prepared it the night before, flipped the bread this morning, baked 20 minutes covered and 20 minutes uncovered, at 350 degrees. ALSO, the "syrup", I made that while it was baking and drizzled it on after the first 20 minutes when I took the reynolds wrap off. There was a TON of syrup, I did not use even half of it.

    It was still soggy, but not too bad. Next time I think to help this I will reduce the amount of liquid (3 eggs, 1 cup cream, 1 tsp vanilla and 1/16 tsp cinnamon) and flip the bread during the midway point. The top was perfect but the bottoms were soggy. It might even need to be put under the broiler at the end for just a little bit.

    So, anyhoo, my thoughts are it doesn't matter what recipe you use, but the technique is probably more important - not using all the liquid, flipping during the baking process, etc.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shugness View Post
    I made this baked french toast recipe this morning, first time making something like this:

    http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Baked-F...-2/Detail.aspx
    That looks very similar to the Creme Brulee Bread Pudding but with a lot more work! If you liked the flavors, try the CBBP and see what you think.
    ~ ~ Leslie ~ ~

  9. #9
    I do think technique and method are more important than following the recipe exactly.
    Humidity plays a pretty large role in how much liquid bread will soak up. I agree with using stale bread. Then on top of that, only add some, 1/2 to 3/4, of the liquid and let it sit for around 30 minutes before adding any more.
    My bread pudding recipe rarely uses all the liquid but once in a while it does so it's best to hold some back just in case the bread doesn't soak it all in. I have found for the bread pudding, if the mixture looks like slightly wet oatmeal it will come out just right after baking. If you do add too much liquid, you can always try to drain some off (ladle, spoon, turkey baster), or add a bit more bread.
    Or, as mentioned, bake it for awhile longer. You can always cover it with foil if it is browning too much. Or, cover at first, and then uncover to finish.
    I'm using bread pudding as an example because it's what I'm most familiar with, but I think the points would apply to baked french toast since it seems very similar to bread pudding.

  10. #10
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    I've made this one a couple of times for New Years Day brunch, and it has never been soggy:

    Overnight Oven-Baked French Toast

    Prepare this french toast recipe the night before and pop in the oven for an easy and delicious brunch dish.

    Dust with powdered sugar just before serving.

    Yield: Makes 8 servings


    1 (16-ounce) French bread loaf
    1/4 cup butter, softened
    4 large eggs
    1 cup milk
    1/4 cup sugar
    2 tablespoons maple syrup
    1 teaspoon vanilla extract
    1/2 teaspoon salt

    Cut bread loaf into about 10 (3/4-inch-thick) slices.

    Spread butter evenly over one cut side of each bread slice.

    Arrange bread, butter side up, in an ungreased 13- x 9-inch baking dish.

    Whisk together eggs and next 5 ingredients; pour over bread, pressing slices down. Cover and chill 8 hours.

    Remove bread slices from baking dish, and place on two lightly greased baking sheets.

    Bake, uncovered, at 350° for 45 minutes or until golden.

    Southern Living, November 2005
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  11. #11
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    Saw something on one o f the Cook's Illustrated shows recently about bread for bread pudding (which "overnight french toast" really is). They said that bread dried in the oven (as opposed to just "stale" bread) worked best. They had one of their science segments about it, don't remember the reasons, but had something to do with how the different processes differed in relation to the moisture. ANYWAY ... Do dry your bread with low heat in the oven first. Also, use a REAL bread, NOT supermarket sandwich bread. Even a supermarket deli french loaf would be better. If you can get some real country-style bread from a real bakery that would be even better.
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  12. #12
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    I agree. A more substantial bread, heavy, and perhaps cut thicker would help lessen the sogginess. This is the recipe I use. Not light but the tops is nice and crisp, probably because of the butter. I really don't remember sogginess, but you don't want french toast toast to be dry.



    Creme Brulee French Toast

    Recipe By :
    Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00
    Categories : Breakfast

    Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    1 stick (1/2 cup) unsalted butter
    1 cup brown sugar, packed
    2 Tablespoons corn syrup
    1 8"-9" round loaf of country-style bread
    5 large, eggs
    1 1/2 cups half and half
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    1 teaspoon Grand Marnier
    1/4 teaspoon salt

    In a small, heavy saucepan melt butter with brown sugar and corn syrup over moderate heat, stirring until smooth and pour into a 13x9x2 baking dish. Cut six 1" thick slices from the center portion of the bread, reserving ends for another use, and trim the crusts. Arrange slices in one layer in the baking dish, squeezing them slightly to fit.


    I n a bowl, whisk together egg, 1/2 & 1/2, vanilla, Grand Marinier, & salt until combined well. Pour evenly over the bread.

    Chill bread mixture, covered, at least 8 hours or up to one day.

    Prehat oven to 350* and bring bread to room temperature. Bake, uncovered, in the middle of the oven until puffed and edges are pale golden, 35-40 minutes.

    Serve immediately.

    NOTES : Recipe off the internet from the The Inn at Walnut Bottom, Cumberland, MD

  13. #13
    This might be more what you're looking for. Link below.
    Because this version of Baked French Toast is just quickly dipped in the custard mixture rather than soaking in it for hours or overnight or baked in the custard it is not soggy. In fact I find it a little on the dry side as I like mine custardy and with a degree of sogginess.
    My DD who will not eat French Toast or any kind of bread pudding because of the soggy factor, will eat this.
    I've made it as instructed and also without the cream cheese. It is delicious but as I said, a little too dry for me.


    http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/p...ipe/index.html

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